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CEE 107R: E3: Extreme Energy Efficiency (CEE 207R)

Be part of a unique and intense six day course about extreme energy efficiency taking place during Spring Break 2018 at Rocky Mountain Institute's Innovation Center in Basalt, Colorado! The course will focus on efficiency techniques' design, performance, choice, evolution, integration, barrier-busting, profitable business-led implementation, and implications for energy supply, competitive success, environment, development, security, etc. Examples will span very diverse sectors, applications, issues, and disciplines, with each day covering a different energy theme: buildings, transportation, industry, and implementation and implications, including renewable energy synergy and integration. Solid technical grounding and acquaintance with basic economics and business concepts will both be helpful. Rocky Mountain Institute (RMI) will design a series of lectures, exercises, and interactive activities synthesizing integrative design principles. Students will be introduced to Factor 10 Engineering, the approach for optimizing the whole system for multiple benefits. Students will work closely and interactively with RMI staff including Amory Lovins, cofounder and Chief Scientist of Rocky Mountain Institute (RMI). Exercises will illuminate challenges RMI has faced and solutions it has created in real-world design. Students will explore clean-sheet solutions that meet end-use demands and optimize whole-system resource efficiency, often with expanding rather than diminishing returns to investments, i.e. making big savings cheaper than small ones. Students will meet as a class once during winter quarter to discuss preparation and spring break logistics. Students must pay for their own travel to and from Basalt, CO (~$400-$600). Course will take place Sunday, March 25 - Friday, March 30. Lodging and food will be covered during the course. Must apply - instructor approval required. All backgrounds and disciplines, both undergraduate and graduate, are welcome to apply. Prerequisite - completion of one of the following courses is required: CEE 107A, CEE 207A, Earthsys 103, CEE 107S, CEE 207S, CEE 176A, CEE 176B. Contact Diana Ginnebaugh at moongdes@stanford.edu for an application. Course website: https://web.stanford.edu/class/cee207r/
Terms: Win | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CEE 207R: E3: Extreme Energy Efficiency (CEE 107R)

Be part of a unique and intense six day course about extreme energy efficiency taking place during Spring Break 2018 at Rocky Mountain Institute's Innovation Center in Basalt, Colorado! The course will focus on efficiency techniques' design, performance, choice, evolution, integration, barrier-busting, profitable business-led implementation, and implications for energy supply, competitive success, environment, development, security, etc. Examples will span very diverse sectors, applications, issues, and disciplines, with each day covering a different energy theme: buildings, transportation, industry, and implementation and implications, including renewable energy synergy and integration. Solid technical grounding and acquaintance with basic economics and business concepts will both be helpful. Rocky Mountain Institute (RMI) will design a series of lectures, exercises, and interactive activities synthesizing integrative design principles. Students will be introduced to Factor 10 Engineering, the approach for optimizing the whole system for multiple benefits. Students will work closely and interactively with RMI staff including Amory Lovins, cofounder and Chief Scientist of Rocky Mountain Institute (RMI). Exercises will illuminate challenges RMI has faced and solutions it has created in real-world design. Students will explore clean-sheet solutions that meet end-use demands and optimize whole-system resource efficiency, often with expanding rather than diminishing returns to investments, i.e. making big savings cheaper than small ones. Students will meet as a class once during winter quarter to discuss preparation and spring break logistics. Students must pay for their own travel to and from Basalt, CO (~$400-$600). Course will take place Sunday, March 25 - Friday, March 30. Lodging and food will be covered during the course. Must apply - instructor approval required. All backgrounds and disciplines, both undergraduate and graduate, are welcome to apply. Prerequisite - completion of one of the following courses is required: CEE 107A, CEE 207A, Earthsys 103, CEE 107S, CEE 207S, CEE 176A, CEE 176B. Contact Diana Ginnebaugh at moongdes@stanford.edu for an application. Course website: https://web.stanford.edu/class/cee207r/
Terms: Win | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

DESINST 230: Bursting the 'Impossible' Bubble-The Art of Creative Engagement

In this class, we¿ll employ the design-thinking process to innovate new theories of learning engagement. Students will explore methodologies like alternative education, improvisational design, storytelling and experience design. Field research will include trips to the SF Exploratorium, the Children's Creativity Museum, Autodesk and Obscura Digital. Students will form hybrid teams with industry experts, fellows, and technical staff, using emerging technology to explore creative leadership and pioneer concepts that will be prototyped, tested, refined and showcased at the Children's Creativity Museum.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

DESINST 310: Negotiation by Design: Applied Design Thinking for Negotiators

Where many stakeholders are working within a complex scenario, the skilled negotiator is comfortable with the inherent ambiguity, at once nimble and careful in responding to new information and changing positions. In this advanced negotiation course, we will crack open some of the fundamental negotiation principles and show you how, where and why design thinking can add unique value to your negotiation skills and outcomes. Mapping and designing the structure and process of your negotiation; understanding tools to gain empathy for the stakeholders involved in the negotiation; learning different styles of negotiation; practicing spontaneity, adaptability and presence in the moment; team brainstorming in preparation, and team dynamics in the execution of a negotiation. You will work through exercises that isolate these skills and then apply them in simulated negotiations, at least one in every class session, to improve your confidence and competence as a negotiator. You and your teammates will then bring them all to bear in a capstone, multi-party, multi-issue negotiation simulation. If you have already taken a basic negotiation course, or have demonstrable experience, we invite you to apply. No previous design thinking experience is required, though certainly useful.nApplication required, see dschool.stanford.edu/classes for more information.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

DESINST 311: Design Abilities Studio

In this Design Abilities Studio students will learn and practice several applied skills with hands-on activities that vary in length, duration, deliverables, and concept. This course focuses on developing core design abilities that make individuals better design thinkers and creative problem solvers. This class is for students of any discipline. Admission by application. See dschool.stanford.edu/classes for more information.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Grading: Credit/No Credit

DESINST 315: Coaching Design Thinking

Design thinking is a team sport. The goal of coaching is to help participants practice the basics and develop skills of the game. This class will break down coaching into its components, parsing out the role of the coach at each stage of the Design Thinking process. Participants will alternate between engaging in activities and coaching them, providing and receiving feedback in real time from the teaching team and their peers. Admission by application. See dschool.stanford.edu/classes for more information.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Barry, M. (PI)

DESINST 366: Creative Gym: A Design Thinking Skills Studio

Build your creative confidence and sharpen your design thinking skills. Train your intuition and expand the design context from which you operate every day. This experimental studio will introduce d.school students to fast- paced experiential exercises that lay the mental and physical foundation for a potent bias toward action, and a wider knowledge of the personal skills that expert design thinkers utilize in all phases of their process. Recent research based on this course curriculum show that performing these class activities will expand your creative capacity in statistically significant ways.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

DESINST 423: Design for Healthy Behavior Change

In the U.S., 75% of medical expenditures are for illnesses that are predominantly lifestyle related such as type 2 diabetes, arthritis and heart disease. It has been shown as people modify their lifestyles with healthier habits, medical problems can be reduced or avoided and a healthier and happier life achieved. The class employs design thinking in teams while working directly with volunteers in the community to help them achieve their health goals. There is an individual project and a team project each with multiple milestones. Learn and experience the design thinking process through interactions and design working within student teams and working directly with patient-volunteers from the practice of Drs. Ann Lindsay and Alan Glaseroff from the Stanford Coordinated Care Clinic. Admission by application. See dschool.stanford.edu/classes for more information.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ME 316A: Product Design Master's Project

For graduate Product Design or Design (Art) majors only. Student teams, under the supervision of the design faculty, spend the quarter researching master's project topics. Students are expected to demonstrate mastery of design thinking methods including; needfinding, brainstorming, field interviews and synthesis during this investigation. Masters projects are selected that involve the synthesis of aesthetics and technological concerns in the service of human need. Design Institute class; see http://dschool.stanford.edu. Prereq: ME277, ME312, ME313
Terms: not given this year | Units: 2-6 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ME 316C: Product Design Master's Project

This is the second half of the two quarter Design Garage sequence. Students will complete projects begun in ME316B the prior quarter. Prerequisite: ME316B and graduate student standing. Design Institute class; see http://dschool.stanford.edu.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 2-6 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
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