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MED 1B: Identity, Power and Privilege in Multicultural Health

An independent study service learning course designed to develop students' understanding of the intersection between identity, power, privilege, and disparities (health, education, environment). Students submit a written reflective term paper based on their experience as staff for the Summer Residential Program as well as their understanding of how constructs of identity, power and privilege impact low-income and underrepresented students in their pursuit of higher education. Prerequisite MED 1A.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

MED 10Q: Literature, Medicine and Empathy (RELIGST 10Q)

In recent years, there has been a groundswell of interest in empathy as a key competency of the emotionally intelligent, and a primary motivator of moral behavior. But what is empathy, exactly? This seminar will seek to find out, exploring the concept through the lens of literature and medicine. nReading novels and exploring the philosophical beginnings of the term empathy, we will learn about the range of ways in which human beings have attempted to know and understand the other. Guided by research studies and our own experience, we will explore the critical question of whether empathy really does lead to altruism. We will consider why it can be so hard for human beings to walk in another's shoes and why we so often fail to do so. Through memoirs of suffering, we will learn about empathy in medicine and about what the latest studies in biology and neuroscience can teach us about how we relate to each other. Lastly, we will explore the dangers and limitations of empathy, reading scholarly circuits and discussing the role of empathy in life and society.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Minor, L. (PI); Shaw, J. (PI)

MED 27SI: Alternative Spring Break: Healthcare of Underserved Communities in Central California

Pre-field group directed reading for Alternative Spring Break: Healthcare of Underserved Communities in Central California.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Garcia, G. (PI)

MED 28SI: Alternative Spring Break: Health Accessibililty

Alternative Spring Break class. Pre-field course for students participating in the Health Accessibility Alternative Spring Break trip. Focuses on the Bay Area and the current state of the U.S. healthcare system, how it has developed, and how it can be transformed to ensure greater accessibility for all.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

MED 50N: Translational Research: Turning Science into Medicine

Investigates how scientific research informs how physicians take care of patients and how clinical research informs how scientific experiments are conducted. Topics include how these two processes have improved health and have resulted in innovation and scientic progress; specific human disease areas in allergy and immunology that affect all ages of patients globally, including food allergy; scientific concepts of research that helped in discovery of novel diagnostics and treatment of disease; ethical roles of physicians and scientists in conducting translational research in human disease.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

MED 51B: Compassionate Presence at the Bedside: The Healer's Art

Students in this class must have already completed MED51Q. This quarter is a skill-based practicum. The skills component of this course is focused on communication and presence at the patient's bedside. Students will learn the theoretical aspects of respectful communication and cultural competence. They will then participate in a variety of immersive simulation activities including role-play, video enacting, class presentations, reflective exercises to understand the nuances of empathetic communication. The focus of the second quarter is to practice the art of communication honestly and compassionately with patients, learning empathy and cultivating the skill of being present at the bedside of a patient. Students will be assigned a panel of seriously ill patients and they do mentored house calls and provide support to patients and families as a volunteer. The idea here is that the knowledge and skills acquired in the first quarter will be utilized in real-life settings to practice compassionate and respectful communication strategies, learn how to be a cam, compassionate and healing presence at the bedside of seriously ill patients. We believe that medical school curricula do not have a strong focus on essential doctoring skills related to communication and a compassionate presence at the bedside. By offering this course to pre-med students, we believe that the doctors of the future will become skilled and compassionate healers.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

MED 71N: Hormones in a Performance-Enhanced Society

(Formerly 117Q) Prefersnce to freshmen. Explores how the availability of hormone therapy has affected various aspects of daily lives. Topics include the controversies concerning menopause and its treatment; use of hormones in athletics; cosmetic use of hormones to enhance growth, strength, and libido; use of hormones as anti-aging drugs; and how the hormone system has influenced our notions of gender. Includes the biochemistry and physiology of the human endocrine system; how hormones influence behavior, and how to read a scientific paper.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Hoffman, A. (PI)

MED 73N: Scientific Method and Bias

Offers an introduction to the scientific method and common biases in science. Examines theoretical considerations and practical examples where biases have led to erroneous conclusions, as well as scientific practices that can help identify, correct or prevent such biases. Additionally focuses on appropriate methods to interweave inductive and deductive approaches. Topics covered include: Popper¿s falsification and Kuhn¿s paradigm shift, revolution vs. evolution; determinism and uncertainty; probability, hypothesis testing, and Bayesian approaches; agnostic testing and big data; team science; peer review; replication; correlation and causation; bias in design, analysis, reporting and sponsorship of research; bias in the public perception of science, mass media and research; and bias in human history and everyday life. Provides students an understanding of how scientific knowledge has been and will be generated; the causes of bias in experimental design and in analytical approaches; and the interactions between deductive and inductive approaches in the generation of knowledge.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Ioannidis, J. (PI)

MED 121: Translational Research and Applied Medicine (MED 221)

(Same as MED 121; undergraduate students enroll in MED 121) Open to graduate students and medical students, this course enables students to learn basic principles in the design, performance and analysis of translational medical research studies. The course includes both didactic seminars from experts in translational medicine as well as the opportunity to design and present a translational research project. Students enrolling for 3 units are paired with a TRAM translational research project and work as a team with TRAM trainees and faculty on a weekly basis, as arranged by the instructor, and present a final project update at the end of the quarter.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 2-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

MED 130: Yesplus: Meditation practices for wellbeing

Meditation Practices for Wellbeing" is a 1-unit course that provides students with tools and strategies to develop a sustainable approach to their happiness and wellbeing. Students will learn breathwork and meditation based techniques to decrease stress and increase peace and focus in day to day life. Students will also study happiness-based research and participate in community building discussions, yoga, and mindfulness processes to learn how wellness can be sustained as a personal practice. Class meets 5 evenings throughout the quarter, along with a mandatory mini retreat during the third week (Thursday 7 - 10 pm, Friday 7 - 10 pm, Saturday 12 - 3 pm). Open to all students, including freshmen and those new to meditation. Enrollment limited to 25. Admission by application, details at first class. See yesplus.stanford.edu for more information.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

MED 160: Physician Shadowing: Stanford Immersion in Medicine Series (SIMS)

Undergraduates are paired with a physician mentor at Stanford Hospital and Clinics, Lucile Packard Children's Hospital, or the Veteran's Administration Hospital. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Application and acceptance to the SIMS program.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

MED 161B: Community Health Advocacy

Second of a three-quarter course series that provides students with knowledge and concrete skills for working with and advocating for underserved populations. Through coursework and placements in community health clinics and social service organizations, student will broaden and deepen their understanding of the social and economic determinants of health, how they impact underserved populations, and the various levels at which these challenges can ¿ and should ¿ be addressed. Student will engage in structured activities that center around supporting the mission of their placement organization: direct service with clients and design and implementation of a capacity-building project. Weekly Monday evening classroom meetings serve as a forum for teaching and training, discussion of class readings and placement experiences, project development, and troubleshooting and support. Prerequisites: MED 257A.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-3 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

MED 181: Preparation for Early Clinical Experience at the Cardinal Free Clinics

Training course for new undergraduate volunteers at the Cardinal Free Clinics (CFCs). Topics include introduction to methods for providing culturally appropriate, high quality transitional medical care for undeserved patient populations, clinic structure and roles, free clinics in the larger context of American healthcare, foundations in community health, cultural humility and implicit bias in healthcare, motivational interviewing and patient advocacy skills, and role-specific preparation. Application only; must be an accepted CFC volunteer. Visit https://cfc.stanford.edu for more information. 1-2 units.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

MED 182: Early Clinical Experience at the Cardinal Free Clinics (MED 282)

The Cardinal Free Clinics, consisting of Arbor and Pacific Free Clinic, provide culturally appropriate, high quality transitional medical care for undeserved patient populations in the Bay Area. Students volunteer in various clinic roles to offer services including health education, interpretation, referrals, and labs. In clinic students are guided in the practice of medical interviews, history-taking and physical examinations as appropriate, and work with attending physicians to arrive at a diagnosis and management plan. Visit http://cfc.stanford.edu for more information.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

MED 184: Team Leadership in the Cardinal Free Clinics I (MED 284)

Introduction to skills for effective leadership, including topics such as conflict resolution, team dynamic. Applied learning through shifts at the Cardinal Free Clinics and related project work. Enrollment limited to Cardinal Free Clinic Managers.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

MED 199: Undergraduate Research

Students undertake investigations sponsored by individual faculty members. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-18 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Advani, R. (PI); Ahmed, A. (PI); Ahuja, N. (PI); Akatsu, H. (PI); Al-Ahmad, A. (PI); Alizadeh, A. (PI); Alsan, M. (PI); Andrews, J. (PI); Annes, J. (PI); Arai, S. (PI); Artandi, M. (PI); Artandi, S. (PI); Asch, S. (PI); Ashley, E. (PI); Assimes, T. (PI); Ayoub, W. (PI); Baiocchi, M. (PI); Banerjee, S. (PI); Barry, M. (PI); Basaviah, P. (PI); Basina, M. (PI); Basu, S. (PI); Behal, R. (PI); Bendavid, E. (PI); Benjamin, J. (PI); Berube, C. (PI); Bhalla, V. (PI); Bhatt, A. (PI); Bhattacharya, J. (PI); Blackburn, B. (PI); Blaschke, T. (PI); Blayney, D. (PI); Blish, C. (PI); Bloom, G. (PI); Bollyky, P. (PI); Bouvier, D. (PI); Boxer, L. (PI); Braddock, C. (PI); Brinton, T. (PI); Brown, W. (PI); Bulow, K. (PI); Carlson, R. (PI); Cartwright, C. (PI); Chan, D. (PI); Chan, G. (PI); Chang, C. (PI); Chang, S. (PI); Chaudhuri, O. (PI); Chen, A. (PI); Chertow, G. (PI); Cheung, R. (PI); Chi, J. (PI); Cho-Phan, C. (PI); Chu, G. (PI); Chua, K. (PI); Chung, L. (PI); Clarke, M. (PI); Clusin, W. (PI); Colevas, A. (PI); Colloff, E. (PI); Contopoulos-Ioannidis, D. (PI); Cooke, J. (PI); Cooper, A. (PI); Coutre, S. (PI); Crapo, L. (PI); Crump, C. (PI); Cullen, M. (PI); Das, A. (PI); Dash, R. (PI); Daugherty, T. (PI); David, S. (PI); Dawson, L. (PI); Deresinski, S. (PI); Desai, M. (PI); Desai, T. (PI); Dhillon, G. (PI); Dorman, J. (PI); Dosiou, C. (PI); Downing, N. (PI); DuBose, A. (PI); Edwards, L. (PI); Einav, S. (PI); Farquhar, J. (PI); Fathman, C. (PI); Fearon, W. (PI); Feldman, D. (PI); Felsher, D. (PI); Fisher, G. (PI); Fitzgerald, P. (PI); Ford, J. (PI); Ford, P. (PI); Fowler, M. (PI); Frayne, S. (PI); Friedland, S. (PI); Fries, J. (PI); Froelicher, V. (PI); Gabiola, J. (PI); Ganjoo, K. (PI); Garcia, G. (PI); Gardner, C. (PI); Gardner, P. (PI); Gavi, B. (PI); Genovese, M. (PI); Gerson, L. (PI); Gesundheit, N. (PI); Giacomini, J. (PI); Glaseroff, A. (PI); Glenn, J. (PI); Goldhaber-Fiebert, J. (PI); Goldstein, M. (PI); Goodman, S. (PI); Goronzy, J. (PI); Gotlib, J. (PI); Gray, G. (PI); Greenberg, H. (PI); Greenberg, P. (PI); Gregory, P. (PI); Habtezion, A. (PI); Hallenbeck, J. (PI); Harman, S. (PI); Harrington, R. (PI); Harshman, L. (PI); Haskell, W. (PI); Heaney, C. (PI); Heidenreich, P. (PI); Henri, H. (PI); Ho, D. (PI); Hoffman, A. (PI); Holman, H. (PI); Holodniy, M. (PI); Hopkins, J. (PI); Horning, S. (PI); Hsia, H. (PI); Hunt, S. (PI); Ioannidis, J. (PI); Isom, R. (PI); Jernick, J. (PI); Ji, H. (PI); Johnston, L. (PI); Jones, E. (PI); Kahn, J. (PI); Kao, P. (PI); Kastelein, M. (PI); Katz, R. (PI); Katzenstein, D. (PI); Kenny, K. (PI); Khatri, P. (PI); Khazeni, N. (PI); Khush, K. (PI); Killen, J. (PI); Kim, S. (PI); Kohrt, H. (PI); Kraemer, F. (PI); Krishnan, E. (PI); Kummar, S. (PI); Kunz, P. (PI); Kuo, C. (PI); Kurian, A. (PI); Kuschner, W. (PI); Ladabaum, U. (PI); Lafayette, R. (PI); Laport, G. (PI); Laws, A. (PI); Lee, D. (PI); Lee, J. (PI); Lee, P. (PI); Leung, L. (PI); Levitt, L. (PI); Levy, R. (PI); Levy, S. (PI); Liang, D. (PI); Liedtke, M. (PI); Lin, B. (PI); Lindsay, A. (PI); Lorig, K. (PI); Lotfi, J. (PI); Lowe, A. (PI); Lowsky, R. (PI); Luby, S. (PI); Lutchman, G. (PI); Majeti, R. (PI); McConnell, M. (PI); McLaughlin, T. (PI); Medeiros, B. (PI); Meyer, T. (PI); Miklos, D. (PI); Miller, G. (PI); Milstein, A. (PI); Mitchell, B. (PI); Mohabir, P. (PI); Montoya, J. (PI); Morioka-Douglas, N. (PI); Musen, M. (PI); Narayan, S. (PI); Neal, J. (PI); Negrin, R. (PI); Nevins, A. (PI); Nguyen, L. (PI); Nguyen, M. (PI); Nguyen, P. (PI); Nicolls, M. (PI); O' Callahan, P. (PI); Osterberg, L. (PI); Owens, D. (PI); Palaniappan, L. (PI); Pao, A. (PI); Parnes, J. (PI); Parsonnet, J. (PI); Pasricha, P. (PI); Pegram, M. (PI); Periyakoil, V. (PI); Petersen, J. (PI); Pinto, H. (PI); Pompei, P. (PI); Popp, R. (PI); Posley, K. (PI); Price, E. (PI); Prochaska, J. (PI); Quertermous, T. (PI); Raffin, T. (PI); Rehkopf, D. (PI); Relman, D. (PI); Rizk, N. (PI); Robinson, B. (PI); Rockson, S. (PI); Rohatgi, R. (PI); Rosas, L. (PI); Rosen, G. (PI); Rosenberg, S. (PI); Rudd, P. (PI); Ruoss, S. (PI); Rydel, T. (PI); Scandling, J. (PI); Schnittger, I. (PI); Schoolnik, G. (PI); Schroeder, J. (PI); Shafer, R. (PI); Shah, J. (PI); Shah, N. (PI); Shah, S. (PI); Sharp, C. (PI); Shen, K. (PI); Shieh, L. (PI); Shizuru, J. (PI); Shoor, S. (PI); Sikic, B. (PI); Singer, S. (PI); Singh, B. (PI); Singh, U. (PI); Skeff, K. (PI); Spiekerkoetter, E. (PI); Srinivas, S. (PI); Stafford, R. (PI); Stefanick, M. (PI); Stertzer, S. (PI); Stevens, D. (PI); Stockdale, F. (PI); Strober, S. (PI); Studdert, D. (PI); Tai, J. (PI); Tamura, M. (PI); Tan, J. (PI); Telli, M. (PI); Tepper, R. (PI); Tompkins, L. (PI); Tremmel, J. (PI); Triadafilopoulos, G. (PI); Tsao, P. (PI); Upadhyay, D. (PI); Utz, P. (PI); Vagelos, R. (PI); Valantine, H. (PI); Verghese, A. (PI); Wakelee, H. (PI); Wang, P. (PI); Warvariv, V. (PI); Weill, D. (PI); Weinacker, A. (PI); Weng, K. (PI); Weng, W. (PI); Weyand, C. (PI); Wiedmann, T. (PI); Winkelmayer, W. (PI); Winkleby, M. (PI); Winograd, C. (PI); Winslow, D. (PI); Winter, T. (PI); Witteles, R. (PI); Wu, J. (PI); Wu, S. (PI); Yabu, J. (PI); Yang, P. (PI); Yeung, A. (PI); Yock, P. (PI); Zamanian, R. (PI); Zehnder, J. (PI); Zei, P. (PI); Zolopa, A. (PI); Zulman, D. (PI); de Jesus Perez, V. (PI); Gardner, C. (SI)

MED 200: Primary Care Presentations

This course is a lecture series offered during the winter quarter. The aim of this seminar is to allow medical students to experience the mindset of primary care physicians in real time. Classes feature presentations of patient cases submitted by Stanford faculty. Faculty presenters are provided with the diagnostic information for the cases in a sequential manner during and not in advance of each class, allowing students to learn from the thought process of physicians in real time as they put together the differential diagnosis, interpret diagnostic information, deliberate treatment and management options, and discuss other thoughts about the cases.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

MED 202: Alternative Spring Break: Rosebud Resilience: Community, Health and Learning in Lakota Nation

Open to MD, graduate, and undergraduate students. Classroom preparation followed by a one week spring break service learning experience on a reservation in South Dakota. Introduces students to the challenges and promise of Native American and rural health care, and the role of communities as leaders and problem solvers. Includes lectures, discussion and readings pertaining to Native American culture, current research in Native American health, and the methods and practice of community based participatory research.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Garcia, G. (PI)

MED 206: Meta-research: Appraising Research Findings, Bias, and Meta-analysis (CHPR 206, HRP 206, STATS 211)

Open to graduate, medical, and undergraduate students. Appraisal of the quality and credibility of research findings; evaluation of sources of bias. Meta-analysis as a quantitative (statistical) method for combining results of independent studies. Examples from medicine, epidemiology, genomics, ecology, social/behavioral sciences, education. Collaborative analyses. Project involving generation of a meta-research project or reworking and evaluation of an existing published meta-analysis. Prerequisite: knowledge of basic statistics.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

MED 207: History of Medicine

Begins with studying Shamanistic medicine, practiced by humans throughout the globe, for millennia. Covers magico-religious medicine developed in ancient Egypt, Mesopotamia and Greece; the 4th Century BC with Hippocrates beginning to separate medicine from religion and magic; the slow progress in ancient Rome, the medieval period, and during the Renaissance; and the acceleration in the pace of discoveries In the last few centuries, as medicine became more scientific, complex, and specialized as Pasteur developed the germ theory of disease, Darwin and Mendel publications begin the development of Evolution and of Genetics, Watson and Crick solved the mystery of DNA structure, organ transplants began, and imaging procedures such as CT and MRI came into being. Lectures are profusely illustrated, and, for the sake of comparison, two equally ancient systems of medicine, the traditional Chinese and the Vedic, are briefly reviewed.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 1 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; CAMARGO, C. (PI)

MED 212: Methods for Health Care Delivery Innovation, Implementation and Evaluation (CHPR 212, HRP 218)

Preference given to postgraduate fellows and graduate students. Focus is on implementation science and evaluation of health care delivery innovations. Topics include implementation science theory, frameworks, and measurement principles; qualitative and quantitative approaches to designing and evaluating new health care models; hybrid design trials that simultaneously evaluate implementation and effectiveness; distinction between quality improvement and research, and implications for regulatory requirements and publication; and grant-writing strategies for implementation science and evaluation. Students will develop a mock (or actual) grant proposal to conduct a needs assessment or evaluate a Stanford/VA/community intervention, incorporating concepts, frameworks, and methods discussed in class. Priority for enrollment for CHPR 212 will be given to CHPR master's students.
Terms: Win | Units: 2 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Asch, S. (PI); Zulman, D. (PI)

MED 215B: Health Policy PhD Core Seminar II--First Year (HRP 201B)

Second in a three-quarter seminar series is the core tutorial for first-year Health Policy and Health Services Research graduate students. Major themes in fields of study including health insurance, healthcare financing and delivery, health systems and reform and disparities in the US and globally, health and economic development, health law and policy, resource allocation, efficiency and equity, healthcare quality, measurement and the efficacy and effectiveness of interventions. Blocks of session led by Stanford expert faculty in particular fields of study.
Terms: Win | Units: 2 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: ; Bundorf, M. (PI)

MED 221: Translational Research and Applied Medicine (MED 121)

(Same as MED 121; undergraduate students enroll in MED 121) Open to graduate students and medical students, this course enables students to learn basic principles in the design, performance and analysis of translational medical research studies. The course includes both didactic seminars from experts in translational medicine as well as the opportunity to design and present a translational research project. Students enrolling for 3 units are paired with a TRAM translational research project and work as a team with TRAM trainees and faculty on a weekly basis, as arranged by the instructor, and present a final project update at the end of the quarter.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 2-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

MED 223: Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Sciences Seminar

The focus of MED223 is to fine tune critical thinking skills by analyzing original publications and understanding the current complexities of the cardiovascular system. Students will attend a lecture series presented by prominent external speakers on Tuesdays and learn new approaches and technology from Stanford faculty on Thursdays. Assigned reading will be discussed and interpreted in class (1-2 papers per class).
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

MED 234: Literature and Global Health (AFRICAAM 229, AFRICAST 229, COMPLIT 229, CSRE 129B, FRENCH 229, HUMBIO 175L)

This course examines the ways writers in literature and medicine have used the narrative form to explore the ethics of care in what has been called the developing world. We will begin with a call made by the editor-in-chief of The Lancet for a literature of global health, namely fiction modeled on the social reform novels of the nineteenth century, understood to have helped readers develop a conscience for public health as the field emerged as a modern medical specialty. We will then spend the quarter understanding how colonial, postcolonial, and world literatures have answered and complicated this call. Readings will include prose fiction by Albert Camus, Joseph Conrad, Tsitsi Dangaremgba, Amitav Ghosh, Susan Sontag as well as physician memoirs featuring Frantz Fanon, Albert Schweitzer, Abraham Verghese, Paul Farmer. And each literary reading will be paired with medical, philosophical, and policy writings that deeply inform the field of global health. Note: To be eligible for WAYS credit, you must take the course for a Letter Grade.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

MED 235: Designing Research-Based Interventions to Solve Global Health Problems (AFRICAST 135, AFRICAST 235, EDUC 135, EDUC 335, HRP 235, HUMBIO 26)

The excitement around social innovation and entrepreneurship has spawned numerous startups focused on tackling world problems, particularly in the fields of education and health. The best social ventures are launched with careful consideration paid to research, design, and efficacy. This course offers students insights into understanding how to effectively develop, evaluate, and scale social ventures. Using TeachAIDS (an award-winning nonprofit educational technology social venture used in 78 countries) as a primary case study, students will be given an in-depth look into how the entity was founded and scaled globally. Guest speakers will include world-class experts and entrepreneurs in Philanthropy, Medicine, Communications, Education, and Technology. Open to both undergraduate and graduate students.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Sorcar, P. (PI); Naim, K. (TA)

MED 240: Sex and Gender in Human Physiology and Disease (FEMGEN 241, HUMBIO 140)

(HumBio students must enroll in HumBio 140.) Chromosomal, hormonal and environmental influences that lead to male and female reproductive systems and neuroendocrine regulation and intersex variants. Masculinizing and feminizing effects of endogenous and exogenous sex hormones and other factors, in particular gender, on the musculoskeletal, neurological, cardiovascular, immunological and other systems and tissues, e.g. adipose, skin, etc. over the lifecourse, from conception to puberty, through reproductive phases (including changes during the menstrual cycle up to and beyond menopause in women, and with aging in both sexes). Transgender health issues. Guest lecturers. Prerequisite: Human Biology core or equivalent, or consent of instructor. HUMBIO students must enroll for 3 units.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-3 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: ; Stefanick, M. (PI)

MED 241: Clinical Skills for Patient Care in Free Clinics

Enrollment in this course is by application only for advanced volunteers at the Cardinal Free Clinics. Focus is on preparing students to gain early clinical experience by teaching basic skills such as taking patient histories, working with interpreters, providing motivational interviewing, and presenting cases to medical students or physicians. Students learn through classroom lectures and practice sessions. Upon successful completion of a competency assessment, students are able to serve in a clinic role in the Cardinal Free Clinics. Prerequisite: Advanced standing as a volunteer at the Cardinal Free Clinics.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

MED 242: Physicians and Human Rights

Weekly lectures on how human rights violations affect health. Topics include: regional conflict and health, the health status of refugees and internally displaced persons; child labor; trafficking in women and children; HIV/AIDS; torture; poverty, the environment and health; access to clean water; domestic violence and sexual assault; and international availability of drugs. Guest speakers from national and international NGOs including Doctors Without Borders; McMaster University Institute for Peace Studies; UC Berkeley Human Rights Center; Kiva.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Laws, A. (PI)

MED 248: Student Rounds

Teams of preclinical students meet weekly with a clinical student to hear the history and physical of a recent case the clinical student encountered on the wards. Following the presentation, the preclinical students work together under the guidance of the clinical student to develop a problem list and plan, which are then compared with the problem list, plan, and orders made by the actual admitting team. In the course of presenting the cases, the clinical student describes personal experiences and practical components of ward work and daily clinical routine.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical School MD Grades
Instructors: ; Kenny, K. (PI)

MED 255: The Responsible Conduct of Research

Forum. How to identify and approach ethical dilemmas that commonly arise in biomedical research. Issues in the practice of research such as in publication and interpretation of data, and issues raised by academic/industry ties. Contemporary debates at the interface of biomedical science and society regarding research on stem cells, bioweapons, genetic testing, human subjects, and vertebrate animals. Completion fulfills NIH/ADAMHA requirement for instruction in the ethical conduct of research. Prerequisite: research experience recommended.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

MED 255C: The Responsible Conduct of Research for Clinical and Community Researchers (CHPR 255)

Engages clinical researchers in discussions about ethical issues commonly encountered during their clinical research careers and addresses contemporary debates at the interface of biomedical science and society. Graduate students required to take RCR who are or will be conducting clinical research are encouraged to enroll in this version of the course. Prequisite: research experience recommended.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

MED 263: Advanced Decision Science Methods and Modeling in Health (HRP 263)

Advanced methods currently used in published model-based cost-effectiveness analyses in medicine and public health, both theory and technical applications. Topics include: Markov and microsimulation models, model calibration and evaluation, and probabilistic sensitivity analyses. Prerequisites: a course in probability, a course in statistics or biostatistics, a course on cost-effectiveness such as HRP 392, a course in economics, and familiarity with decision modeling software such as TreeAge.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

MED 272A: Biodesign Innovation: Needs Finding and Concept Creation (BIOE 374A, ME 368A)

In this two-quarter course series ( BIOE 374A/B, MED 272A/B, ME 368A/B, OIT 384/5), multidisciplinary student teams identify real-world unmet healthcare needs, invent new health technologies to address them, and plan for their implementation into patient care. During the first quarter (winter 2018), students select and characterize an important unmet healthcare problem, validate it through primary interviews and secondary research, and then brainstorm and screen initial technology-based solutions. In the second quarter (spring 2018), teams select a lead solution and move it toward the market through prototyping, technical re-risking, strategies to address healthcare-specific requirements (regulation, reimbursement), and business planning. Final presentations in winter and spring are made to a panel of prominent health technology experts and/or investors. Class sessions include faculty-led instruction and case studies, coaching sessions by industry specialists, expert guest lecturers, and interactive team meetings. Enrollment is by application only, and students are expected to participate in both quarters of the course. Visit http://biodesign.stanford.edu/programs/stanford-courses/biodesign-innovation.html to access the application, examples of past projects, and student testimonials. More information about Stanford Biodesign, which has led to the creation of more than 40 venture-backed healthcare companies and has helped hundreds of student launch health technology careers, can be found at http://biodesign.stanford.edu/.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

MED 282: Early Clinical Experience at the Cardinal Free Clinics (MED 182)

The Cardinal Free Clinics, consisting of Arbor and Pacific Free Clinic, provide culturally appropriate, high quality transitional medical care for undeserved patient populations in the Bay Area. Students volunteer in various clinic roles to offer services including health education, interpretation, referrals, and labs. In clinic students are guided in the practice of medical interviews, history-taking and physical examinations as appropriate, and work with attending physicians to arrive at a diagnosis and management plan. Visit http://cfc.stanford.edu for more information.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

MED 284: Team Leadership in the Cardinal Free Clinics I (MED 184)

Introduction to skills for effective leadership, including topics such as conflict resolution, team dynamic. Applied learning through shifts at the Cardinal Free Clinics and related project work. Enrollment limited to Cardinal Free Clinic Managers.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

MED 290: Independent Study with Presence and the Program in Bedside Medicine

Students work with their faculty mentor on projects and studies that are broadly centered around the vision and mission of Presence: The Art and Science of Human Connection and the Program in Bedside Medicine. Please see our websites for updated projects and initiatives - Presence + Program in Bedside Medicine. Currently, we focus on: How do we teach and emphasize to students, residents, physicians (and beyond) in the medical field the need to master bedside skills? How does bedside medicine affect patient care? How has patient care changed with the omnipresence of technology in our lives? How is bedside medicine going to change in the next few decades, centuries? In investigating these questions, students utilize scientific articles and data, engage patients, and collaborate with our faculty and staff. Independent study projects culminate in a presentation to our team, with the potential for posters or manuscripts. Students paired with faculty based on their area of interest and faculty/project needs.We emphasize the human connection with patients, and students are encouraged to engage patients within our program for teaching sessions, research studies, among other projects. Enrollment varies with and is limited to faculty need. Repeatable for credit; more than one-quarter of commitment expected.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

MED 295: Advanced Cardiac Life Support

(For clinical MD students only) Prepares students to manage the victim of a cardiac arrest. Knowledge and skills necessary for resuscitation of critically ill patients. Clinical scenarios and small group discussions address cardiovascular pharmacology, arrhythmia recognition and therapy, acute coronary syndrome including myocardial infarction, ventricular dysrhythmias and defibrillation, and acute ischemic stroke. Requires pre-course preparation and an intensive two-day session on a Friday and Saturday. Students should get the approval of their Clerkship Coordinator before registering for the course. Recommended prerequisites: Medicine 300A, Pediatrics 300A, or Surgery 300A. Prerequisite: EMED 201A
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 2 | Grading: Medical School MD Grades

MED 299: Directed Reading in Medicine

Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-18 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Advani, R. (PI); Ahmed, A. (PI); Ahuja, N. (PI); Akatsu, H. (PI); Al-Ahmad, A. (PI); Alizadeh, A. (PI); Alsan, M. (PI); Andrews, J. (PI); Annes, J. (PI); Arai, S. (PI); Artandi, M. (PI); Artandi, S. (PI); Asch, S. (PI); Ashley, E. (PI); Assimes, T. (PI); Ayoub, W. (PI); Banerjee, S. (PI); Barry, M. (PI); Basaviah, P. (PI); Basina, M. (PI); Basu, S. (PI); Behal, R. (PI); Bendavid, E. (PI); Benjamin, J. (PI); Berube, C. (PI); Bhalla, V. (PI); Bhatt, A. (PI); Bhattacharya, J. (PI); Blackburn, B. (PI); Blaschke, T. (PI); Blayney, D. (PI); Blish, C. (PI); Bloom, G. (PI); Bollyky, P. (PI); Bouvier, D. (PI); Boxer, L. (PI); Braddock, C. (PI); Brinton, T. (PI); Brown, W. (PI); Bulow, K. (PI); Carlson, R. (PI); Cartwright, C. (PI); Chakravarty, E. (PI); Chan, D. (PI); Chan, G. (PI); Chang, C. (PI); Chang, S. (PI); Chen, A. (PI); Chertow, G. (PI); Cheung, R. (PI); Chi, J. (PI); Cho-Phan, C. (PI); Chu, G. (PI); Chua, K. (PI); Chung, L. (PI); Clarke, M. (PI); Clusin, W. (PI); Colevas, A. (PI); Colloff, E. (PI); Contopoulos-Ioannidis, D. (PI); Cooke, J. (PI); Cooper, A. (PI); Coutre, S. (PI); Crapo, L. (PI); Crump, C. (PI); Cullen, M. (PI); Das, A. (PI); Dash, R. (PI); Daugherty, T. (PI); David, S. (PI); Dawson, L. (PI); Deresinski, S. (PI); Desai, M. (PI); Desai, T. (PI); Dhillon, G. (PI); Dorman, J. (PI); Dosiou, C. (PI); DuBose, A. (PI); Edwards, L. (PI); Einav, S. (PI); Farquhar, J. (PI); Fathman, C. (PI); Fearon, W. (PI); Feldman, D. (PI); Felsher, D. (PI); Fisher, G. (PI); Fitzgerald, P. (PI); Ford, J. (PI); Ford, P. (PI); Fowler, M. (PI); Frayne, S. (PI); Friedland, S. (PI); Fries, J. (PI); Froelicher, V. (PI); Gabiola, J. (PI); Ganjoo, K. (PI); Garcia, G. (PI); Garcia, R. (PI); Gardner, C. (PI); Gardner, P. (PI); Gavi, B. (PI); Genovese, M. (PI); Gerson, L. (PI); Gesundheit, N. (PI); Giacomini, J. (PI); Glaseroff, A. (PI); Glenn, J. (PI); Goldhaber-Fiebert, J. (PI); Goldstein, M. (PI); Goodman, S. (PI); Goronzy, J. (PI); Gotlib, J. (PI); Gray, G. (PI); Greenberg, H. (PI); Greenberg, P. (PI); Gregory, P. (PI); Habtezion, A. (PI); Hallenbeck, J. (PI); Harman, S. (PI); Harrington, R. (PI); Harshman, L. (PI); Haskell, W. (PI); Heaney, C. (PI); Heidenreich, P. (PI); Henri, H. (PI); Ho, D. (PI); Hoffman, A. (PI); Holman, H. (PI); Holodniy, M. (PI); Hopkins, J. (PI); Horning, S. (PI); Hsia, H. (PI); Hunt, S. (PI); Ioannidis, J. (PI); Isom, R. (PI); Jernick, J. (PI); Ji, H. (PI); Johnston, L. (PI); Jones, E. (PI); Kahn, J. (PI); Kao, P. (PI); Kastelein, M. (PI); Katz, R. (PI); Katzenstein, D. (PI); Kenny, K. (PI); Khatri, P. (PI); Khazeni, N. (PI); Khush, K. (PI); Killen, J. (PI); Kim, S. (PI); Kohrt, H. (PI); Kraemer, F. (PI); Krishnan, E. (PI); Kummar, S. (PI); Kunz, P. (PI); Kuo, C. (PI); Kurian, A. (PI); Kuschner, W. (PI); Ladabaum, U. (PI); Lafayette, R. (PI); Laport, G. (PI); Lee, D. (PI); Lee, J. (PI); Lee, P. (PI); Leung, L. (PI); Levin, E. (PI); Levitt, J. (PI); Levitt, L. (PI); Levy, R. (PI); Levy, S. (PI); Liang, D. (PI); Liedtke, M. (PI); Lin, S. (PI); Lindsay, A. (PI); Lorig, K. (PI); Lowe, A. (PI); Lowsky, R. (PI); Luby, S. (PI); Lutchman, G. (PI); Majeti, R. (PI); McConnell, M. (PI); McLaughlin, T. (PI); Medeiros, B. (PI); Meyer, T. (PI); Miklos, D. (PI); Miller, G. (PI); Milstein, A. (PI); Mitchell, B. (PI); Mohabir, P. (PI); Montoya, J. (PI); Morioka-Douglas, N. (PI); Musen, M. (PI); Narayan, S. (PI); Neal, J. (PI); Negrin, R. (PI); Nevins, A. (PI); Nguyen, L. (PI); Nguyen, M. (PI); Nguyen, P. (PI); Nicolls, M. (PI); O' Callahan, P. (PI); Osterberg, L. (PI); Owens, D. (PI); Pao, A. (PI); Parnes, J. (PI); Parsonnet, J. (PI); Pasricha, P. (PI); Pegram, M. (PI); Periyakoil, V. (PI); Petersen, J. (PI); Pinto, H. (PI); Pompei, P. (PI); Popp, R. (PI); Posley, K. (PI); Price, E. (PI); Prochaska, J. (PI); Quertermous, T. (PI); Raffin, T. (PI); Rehkopf, D. (PI); Relman, D. (PI); Rizk, N. (PI); Robinson, B. (PI); Rockson, S. (PI); Rohatgi, R. (PI); Rosas, L. (PI); Rosen, G. (PI); Rosenberg, S. (PI); Rudd, P. (PI); Ruoss, S. (PI); Rydel, T. (PI); Scandling, J. (PI); Schillinger, E. (PI); Schnittger, I. (PI); Schoolnik, G. (PI); Schroeder, J. (PI); Shafer, R. (PI); Shah, N. (PI); Shah, S. (PI); Sharp, C. (PI); Shen, K. (PI); Shieh, L. (PI); Shizuru, J. (PI); Shoor, S. (PI); Sikic, B. (PI); Singer, S. (PI); Singh, B. (PI); Singh, U. (PI); Skeff, K. (PI); Smith-Coggins, R. (PI); Spiekerkoetter, E. (PI); Srinivas, S. (PI); Stafford, R. (PI); Stefanick, M. (PI); Stertzer, S. (PI); Stevens, D. (PI); Stockdale, F. (PI); Strober, S. (PI); Studdert, D. (PI); Tai, J. (PI); Tamura, M. (PI); Tan, J. (PI); Telli, M. (PI); Tepper, R. (PI); Tompkins, L. (PI); Tremmel, J. (PI); Triadafilopoulos, G. (PI); Tsao, P. (PI); Upadhyay, D. (PI); Utz, P. (PI); Vagelos, R. (PI); Valantine, H. (PI); Verghese, A. (PI); Wakelee, H. (PI); Wang, P. (PI); Warvariv, V. (PI); Weill, D. (PI); Weinacker, A. (PI); Weng, K. (PI); Weng, W. (PI); Weyand, C. (PI); Wiedmann, T. (PI); Winkelmayer, W. (PI); Winkleby, M. (PI); Winslow, D. (PI); Winter, T. (PI); Witteles, R. (PI); Wu, J. (PI); Wu, S. (PI); Yabu, J. (PI); Yang, P. (PI); Yeung, A. (PI); Yock, P. (PI); Zamanian, R. (PI); Zehnder, J. (PI); Zei, P. (PI); Zolopa, A. (PI); Zulman, D. (PI); de Jesus Perez, V. (PI); Mendoza, F. (SI); Irvine, C. (GP); Jezmir, J. (TA)

MED 370: Medical Scholars Research

Provides an opportunity for student and faculty interaction, as well as academic credit and financial support, to medical students who undertake original research. Enrollment is limited to students with approved projects.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 4-18 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical School MD Grades
Instructors: ; Advani, R. (PI); Ahmed, A. (PI); Ahuja, N. (PI); Akatsu, H. (PI); Al-Ahmad, A. (PI); Alizadeh, A. (PI); Alsan, M. (PI); Andrews, J. (PI); Annes, J. (PI); Arai, S. (PI); Artandi, M. (PI); Artandi, S. (PI); Asch, S. (PI); Ashley, E. (PI); Assimes, T. (PI); Ayoub, W. (PI); Banerjee, S. (PI); Barry, M. (PI); Basaviah, P. (PI); Basina, M. (PI); Basu, S. (PI); Behal, R. (PI); Bendavid, E. (PI); Benjamin, J. (PI); Berube, C. (PI); Bhalla, V. (PI); Bhatt, A. (PI); Bhattacharya, J. (PI); Blackburn, B. (PI); Blaschke, T. (PI); Blayney, D. (PI); Blish, C. (PI); Blumenfeld, Y. (PI); Bollyky, P. (PI); Bouvier, D. (PI); Boxer, L. (PI); Braddock, C. (PI); Braitman, L. (PI); Brinton, T. (PI); Brown, W. (PI); Bulow, K. (PI); Carlson, R. (PI); Cartwright, C. (PI); Chan, D. (PI); Chan, G. (PI); Chang, C. (PI); Chang, S. (PI); Chang, T. (PI); Chao, S. (PI); Chao, T. (PI); Chen, A. (PI); Chertow, G. (PI); Cheung, L. (PI); Cheung, R. (PI); Chi, J. (PI); Cho-Phan, C. (PI); Chu, C. (PI); Chu, G. (PI); Chua, K. (PI); Chung, L. (PI); Clarke, M. (PI); Clusin, W. (PI); Colevas, A. (PI); Colloff, E. (PI); Contopoulos-Ioannidis, D. (PI); Cooke, J. (PI); Cooper, A. (PI); Coutre, S. (PI); Crapo, L. (PI); Crump, C. (PI); Cullen, M. (PI); Czechowicz, A. (PI); Das, A. (PI); Dash, R. (PI); Daugherty, T. (PI); David, S. (PI); Davis, K. (PI); Dawson, L. (PI); Deresinski, S. (PI); Desai, M. (PI); Desai, T. (PI); Dhillon, G. (PI); Dorman, J. (PI); Dosiou, C. (PI); DuBose, A. (PI); Edwards, L. (PI); Einav, S. (PI); Farquhar, J. (PI); Fathman, C. (PI); Fearon, W. (PI); Feldman, D. (PI); Felsher, D. (PI); Fisher, G. (PI); Fitzgerald, P. (PI); Flavin, K. (PI); Ford, J. (PI); Ford, P. (PI); Fowler, M. (PI); Frayne, S. (PI); Friedland, S. (PI); Fries, J. (PI); Froelicher, V. (PI); Gabiola, J. (PI); Ganjoo, K. (PI); Garcia, G. (PI); Gardner, C. (PI); Gardner, P. (PI); Gavi, B. (PI); Genovese, M. (PI); Gerson, L. (PI); Gesundheit, N. (PI); Giacomini, J. (PI); Glaseroff, A. (PI); Glenn, J. (PI); Goldhaber-Fiebert, J. (PI); Goldstein, M. (PI); Goodman, S. (PI); Goronzy, J. (PI); Gotlib, J. (PI); Gray, G. (PI); Greenberg, H. (PI); Greenberg, P. (PI); Gregory, P. (PI); Habtezion, A. (PI); Hallenbeck, J. (PI); Harman, S. (PI); Harrington, R. (PI); Harshman, L. (PI); Haskell, W. (PI); Heaney, C. (PI); Heidenreich, P. (PI); Henri, H. (PI); Ho, D. (PI); Hoffman, A. (PI); Holman, H. (PI); Holodniy, M. (PI); Hopkins, J. (PI); Horning, S. (PI); Hsia, H. (PI); Hunt, S. (PI); Ioannidis, J. (PI); Isom, R. (PI); Jernick, J. (PI); Ji, H. (PI); Johnston, L. (PI); Jones, E. (PI); Judy, A. (PI); Kahn, J. (PI); Kamal, R. (PI); Kao, P. (PI); Kastelein, M. (PI); Katz, R. (PI); Katzenstein, D. (PI); Kenny, K. (PI); Khatri, P. (PI); Khazeni, N. (PI); Khush, K. (PI); Killen, J. (PI); Kim, S. (PI); King, A. (PI); Kohrt, H. (PI); Kraemer, F. (PI); Kraus, E. (PI); Krishnan, E. (PI); Kummar, S. (PI); Kunz, P. (PI); Kuo, C. (PI); Kurian, A. (PI); Kuschner, W. (PI); Kwong, B. (PI); Ladabaum, U. (PI); Lafayette, R. (PI); Laport, G. (PI); Lee, D. (PI); Lee, J. (PI); Lee, P. (PI); Leung, L. (PI); Levitt, L. (PI); Levy, R. (PI); Levy, S. (PI); Liang, D. (PI); Liedtke, M. (PI); Lin, S. (PI); Lindsay, A. (PI); Lorenz, K. (PI); Lorig, K. (PI); Lowe, A. (PI); Lowsky, R. (PI); Luby, S. (PI); Luhrmann, T. (PI); Luo, L. (PI); Lutchman, G. (PI); Mahoney, M. (PI); Majeti, R. (PI); McConnell, M. (PI); McLaughlin, T. (PI); Medeiros, B. (PI); Meyer, T. (PI); Miklos, D. (PI); Miller, G. (PI); Milstein, A. (PI); Mitchell, B. (PI); Mohabir, P. (PI); Montoya, J. (PI); Morioka-Douglas, N. (PI); Musen, M. (PI); Narayan, S. (PI); Neal, J. (PI); Negrin, R. (PI); Nevins, A. (PI); Nguyen, L. (PI); Nguyen, M. (PI); Nguyen, P. (PI); Nicolls, M. (PI); O' Callahan, P. (PI); Osterberg, L. (PI); Owens, D. (PI); Padda, S. (PI); Pao, A. (PI); Parnes, J. (PI); Parsonnet, J. (PI); Pasricha, P. (PI); Pegram, M. (PI); Pepper, J. (PI); Periyakoil, V. (PI); Petersen, J. (PI); Pinto, H. (PI); Pompei, P. (PI); Popp, R. (PI); Posley, K. (PI); Price, E. (PI); Prochaska, J. (PI); Qi, S. (PI); Quertermous, T. (PI); Raffin, T. (PI); Ramchandran, K. (PI); Rehkopf, D. (PI); Relman, D. (PI); Rizk, N. (PI); Robinson, B. (PI); Rockson, S. (PI); Rohatgi, R. (PI); Rosas, L. (PI); Rosen, G. (PI); Rosenberg, S. (PI); Rudd, P. (PI); Ruoss, S. (PI); Rydel, T. (PI); Scandling, J. (PI); Schnittger, I. (PI); Schoolnik, G. (PI); Schroeder, J. (PI); Shafer, R. (PI); Shah, J. (PI); Shah, N. (PI); Shah, S. (PI); Sharp, C. (PI); Shen, K. (PI); Shieh, L. (PI); Shizuru, J. (PI); Shoor, S. (PI); Sikic, B. (PI); Singer, S. (PI); Singh, B. (PI); Singh, U. (PI); Skeff, K. (PI); Spiekerkoetter, E. (PI); Srinivas, S. (PI); Stafford, R. (PI); Stefanick, M. (PI); Stertzer, S. (PI); Stevens, D. (PI); Stockdale, F. (PI); Strober, S. (PI); Studdert, D. (PI); Svec, D. (PI); Tabor, H. (PI); Tai, J. (PI); Tamura, M. (PI); Tan, J. (PI); Telli, M. (PI); Tepper, R. (PI); Tompkins, L. (PI); Tremmel, J. (PI); Triadafilopoulos, G. (PI); Tsao, P. (PI); Upadhyay, D. (PI); Utz, P. (PI); Vagelos, R. (PI); Valantine, H. (PI); Verghese, A. (PI); Wakelee, H. (PI); Wang, P. (PI); Warvariv, V. (PI); Weill, D. (PI); Weinacker, A. (PI); Weng, K. (PI); Weng, W. (PI); Weyand, C. (PI); Winkelmayer, W. (PI); Winkleby, M. (PI); Winter, T. (PI); Witteles, R. (PI); Wu, J. (PI); Wu, S. (PI); Yabu, J. (PI); Yang, P. (PI); Yeung, A. (PI); Yock, P. (PI); Zamanian, R. (PI); Zehnder, J. (PI); Zei, P. (PI); Zolopa, A. (PI); Zulman, D. (PI); de Jesus Perez, V. (PI); Cullen, M. (SI); Krishnan, A. (GP)

MED 399: Graduate Research

Students undertake investigations sponsored by individual faculty members. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-18 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Advani, R. (PI); Ahmed, A. (PI); Ahuja, N. (PI); Akatsu, H. (PI); Al-Ahmad, A. (PI); Alizadeh, A. (PI); Alsan, M. (PI); Andrews, J. (PI); Annes, J. (PI); Arai, S. (PI); Artandi, M. (PI); Artandi, S. (PI); Asch, S. (PI); Ashley, E. (PI); Assimes, T. (PI); Ayoub, W. (PI); Banerjee, S. (PI); Barry, M. (PI); Basaviah, P. (PI); Basina, M. (PI); Basu, S. (PI); Behal, R. (PI); Bendavid, E. (PI); Benjamin, J. (PI); Berube, C. (PI); Bhalla, V. (PI); Bhatt, A. (PI); Bhattacharya, J. (PI); Blackburn, B. (PI); Blaschke, T. (PI); Blayney, D. (PI); Blish, C. (PI); Bollyky, P. (PI); Bouvier, D. (PI); Boxer, L. (PI); Braddock, C. (PI); Brinton, T. (PI); Brown, W. (PI); Bulow, K. (PI); Carlson, R. (PI); Cartwright, C. (PI); Chan, D. (PI); Chan, G. (PI); Chang, C. (PI); Chang, S. (PI); Chen, A. (PI); Chertow, G. (PI); Cheung, R. (PI); Chi, J. (PI); Cho-Phan, C. (PI); Chu, G. (PI); Chua, K. (PI); Chung, L. (PI); Clarke, M. (PI); Clusin, W. (PI); Colevas, A. (PI); Colloff, E. (PI); Contopoulos-Ioannidis, D. (PI); Cooke, J. (PI); Cooper, A. (PI); Coutre, S. (PI); Crapo, L. (PI); Crump, C. (PI); Cullen, M. (PI); Das, A. (PI); Dash, R. (PI); Daugherty, T. (PI); David, S. (PI); Dawson, L. (PI); Deresinski, S. (PI); Desai, M. (PI); Desai, T. (PI); Dhillon, G. (PI); Dorman, J. (PI); Dosiou, C. (PI); DuBose, A. (PI); Einav, S. (PI); Farquhar, J. (PI); Fathman, C. (PI); Fearon, W. (PI); Feldman, D. (PI); Felsher, D. (PI); Fisher, G. (PI); Fitzgerald, P. (PI); Ford, J. (PI); Ford, P. (PI); Fowler, M. (PI); Frayne, S. (PI); Friedland, S. (PI); Fries, J. (PI); Froelicher, V. (PI); Gabiola, J. (PI); Ganjoo, K. (PI); Garcia, G. (PI); Gardner, C. (PI); Gardner, P. (PI); Gavi, B. (PI); Genovese, M. (PI); Gerson, L. (PI); Gesundheit, N. (PI); Giacomini, J. (PI); Glaseroff, A. (PI); Glenn, J. (PI); Goldhaber-Fiebert, J. (PI); Goldstein, M. (PI); Goodman, S. (PI); Goronzy, J. (PI); Gotlib, J. (PI); Gray, G. (PI); Greenberg, H. (PI); Greenberg, P. (PI); Gregory, P. (PI); Habtezion, A. (PI); Hallenbeck, J. (PI); Harman, S. (PI); Harrington, R. (PI); Harshman, L. (PI); Haskell, W. (PI); Heaney, C. (PI); Heidenreich, P. (PI); Henri, H. (PI); Ho, D. (PI); Hoffman, A. (PI); Holman, H. (PI); Holodniy, M. (PI); Hopkins, J. (PI); Horning, S. (PI); Hsia, H. (PI); Hunt, S. (PI); Ioannidis, J. (PI); Isom, R. (PI); Jernick, J. (PI); Ji, H. (PI); Johnston, L. (PI); Jones, E. (PI); Kahn, J. (PI); Kao, P. (PI); Kastelein, M. (PI); Katz, R. (PI); Katzenstein, D. (PI); Kenny, K. (PI); Khatri, P. (PI); Khazeni, N. (PI); Khush, K. (PI); Killen, J. (PI); Kim, S. (PI); Kohrt, H. (PI); Kraemer, F. (PI); Krishnan, E. (PI); Kummar, S. (PI); Kunz, P. (PI); Kuo, C. (PI); Kurian, A. (PI); Kuschner, W. (PI); Ladabaum, U. (PI); Lafayette, R. (PI); Laport, G. (PI); Lee, D. (PI); Lee, J. (PI); Lee, P. (PI); Leung, L. (PI); Levitt, J. (PI); Levitt, L. (PI); Levy, R. (PI); Levy, S. (PI); Liang, D. (PI); Liedtke, M. (PI); Lindsay, A. (PI); Lorig, K. (PI); Lowe, A. (PI); Lowsky, R. (PI); Luby, S. (PI); Lutchman, G. (PI); Majeti, R. (PI); McConnell, M. (PI); McLaughlin, T. (PI); Medeiros, B. (PI); Meyer, T. (PI); Miklos, D. (PI); Miller, G. (PI); Milstein, A. (PI); Mitchell, B. (PI); Mohabir, P. (PI); Montoya, J. (PI); Morioka-Douglas, N. (PI); Musen, M. (PI); Narayan, S. (PI); Neal, J. (PI); Negrin, R. (PI); Nevins, A. (PI); Nguyen, L. (PI); Nguyen, M. (PI); Nguyen, P. (PI); Nicolls, M. (PI); O' Callahan, P. (PI); Osterberg, L. (PI); Owens, D. (PI); Pao, A. (PI); Parnes, J. (PI); Parsonnet, J. (PI); Pasricha, P. (PI); Pegram, M. (PI); Periyakoil, V. (PI); Petersen, J. (PI); Pinto, H. (PI); Pompei, P. (PI); Popp, R. (PI); Posley, K. (PI); Price, E. (PI); Prochaska, J. (PI); Quertermous, T. (PI); Raffin, T. (PI); Rehkopf, D. (PI); Relman, D. (PI); Rizk, N. (PI); Robinson, B. (PI); Rockson, S. (PI); Rohatgi, R. (PI); Rosas, L. (PI); Rosen, G. (PI); Rosenberg, S. (PI); Rudd, P. (PI); Ruoss, S. (PI); Rydel, T. (PI); Scandling, J. (PI); Schnittger, I. (PI); Schoolnik, G. (PI); Schroeder, J. (PI); Shafer, R. (PI); Shah, N. (PI); Shah, S. (PI); Sharp, C. (PI); Shen, K. (PI); Shieh, L. (PI); Shizuru, J. (PI); Shoor, S. (PI); Sikic, B. (PI); Singh, B. (PI); Singh, U. (PI); Skeff, K. (PI); Spiekerkoetter, E. (PI); Srinivas, S. (PI); Stafford, R. (PI); Stefanick, M. (PI); Stertzer, S. (PI); Stevens, D. (PI); Stockdale, F. (PI); Strober, S. (PI); Studdert, D. (PI); Tai, J. (PI); Tamura, M. (PI); Tan, J. (PI); Telli, M. (PI); Tepper, R. (PI); Tompkins, L. (PI); Tremmel, J. (PI); Triadafilopoulos, G. (PI); Tsao, P. (PI); Upadhyay, D. (PI); Utz, P. (PI); Vagelos, R. (PI); Valantine, H. (PI); Verghese, A. (PI); Wakelee, H. (PI); Wang, P. (PI); Warvariv, V. (PI); Weill, D. (PI); Weinacker, A. (PI); Weng, K. (PI); Weng, W. (PI); Weyand, C. (PI); Winkelmayer, W. (PI); Winkleby, M. (PI); Winter, T. (PI); Witteles, R. (PI); Wu, J. (PI); Wu, S. (PI); Yabu, J. (PI); Yang, P. (PI); Yeung, A. (PI); Yock, P. (PI); Zamanian, R. (PI); Zehnder, J. (PI); Zei, P. (PI); Zolopa, A. (PI); Zulman, D. (PI); de Jesus Perez, V. (PI)
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