Print Settings
 

ENGLISH 9CE: Creative Expression in Writing

Primary focus on giving students a skill set to tap into their own creativity. Opportunities for students to explore their creative strengths, develop a vocabulary with which to discuss their own creativity, and experiment with the craft and adventure of their own writing. Students will come out of the course strengthened in their ability to identify and pursue their own creative interests. For undergrads only.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGLISH 9CT: Special Topics in Creative Expression

Focus on a particular topic or process of creative expression. Primary focus on giving students a skill set to tap into their own creativity. Opportunities for students to explore their creative strengths, develop a vocabulary with which to discuss their own creativity, and experiment with the craft and adventure of their own writing. Students will come out of the course strengthened in their ability to identify and pursue their own creative interests. For undergrads only. May repeat for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ENGLISH 10B: Introduction to English I: What is Literary History?

From the 14th to the 17th centuries, what are the relations between literature and history? How has our understanding of key works changed as historicism--or the approach that treats a period in its specificity--has changed? Discussion of how literature works as a force in culture, not only a reflection of other forces. Readings from Old English lyrics, Chaucer, the Gawain poet, More, Wyatt, Surrey, Lock, Sidney, Spenser, Ralegh, Marlowe, Shakespeare, Donne, Herbert, Milton and Cavendish.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Greene, R. (PI)

ENGLISH 11A: Introduction to English II: From Milton to the Romantics

Major moments in English literary history, from John Milton's Paradise Lost to John Keats's Hyperion. The trajectory involves a variety of literary forms, including Augustan satire, the illuminated poetry of William Blake's handcrafted books, the historical novel invented by Sir Walter Scott, the society novel of Jane Austen, and William Wordsworth's epic of psychological and artistic development. Literary texts will be studied in the context of important cultural influences, among them civil war, religious dissent, revolution, commercialization, colonialism, and industrialization.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ENGLISH 48N: The American Songbook and Love Poetry (AMSTUD 48N)

A study of performances (Billie Holiday, Frank Sinatra etc) of songs by classic American composers (Porter, Rogers and Hart, Cohen).
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Fields, K. (PI)

ENGLISH 50: HUMANITIES HOUSE WORKSHOP

For student research workshops in Ng House / Humanities House. Open to both residents and non-residents. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

ENGLISH 50A: Character Development: Writing a Script, Creating Engaging Characters

Seminar with Writer in Residence John Markus (BA English '78); meets for seven sessions over three weeks in February. Students will work one on one and in small groups with this professional writer and Stanford alum. John has written everything from stand-up to critically-acclaimed network and cable television shows to independent films to, most recently, theatrical plays. This seminar is designed for students who would like to produce a piece of work in three weeks and/or to pursue a writing profession.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Grading: Credit/No Credit

ENGLISH 51N: The Sisters: Poetry & Painting (ARTHIST 160N)

Poetry and painting have often been called the "sister arts". Why? Sometimes a poem or a painting stands out to us, asking that we stay with it, that we remember it, although we cannot exactly say why. Poems have a way of making pictures in the mind, and paintings turn "rhymes" amid the people, places, and things they portray. Each is a concentrated world, inviting an exhilarating closeness of response: why does this line come first? Why does the artist include that detail? Who knows but that as we write and talk about these poems and pictures we will be doing what John Keats said a painter does: that is, arriving at a "trembling delicate and snail-horn perception of Beauty." Each week explore the kinship between a different pair of painter and poet and also focuses on a particular problem or method of interpretation. Some of the artist/poet combinations we will consider: Shakespeare and Caravaggio; Jorie Graham and (the photographer) Henri Cartier-Bresson; Alexander Pope and Thomas Gainsborough; William Wordsworth and Caspar David Friedrich; Christina Rossetti and Mary Cassatt; Walt Whitman and Thomas Eakins; Thomas Hardy and Edward Hopper.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ENGLISH 90: Fiction Writing

The elements of fiction writing: narration, description, and dialogue. Students write complete stories and participate in story workshops. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: PWR 1 (waived in summer quarter).
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGLISH 90Q: Sports Writing

Study and practice of the unique narratives, tropes, images and arguments that creative writers develop when they write about popular sport. From regional fandom to individualist adventuring, boxing and baseball to mascot dancing and table tennis, exceptional creative writers mine from a diversity of leisure activity a rich vein of ¿sports writing¿ in the creative nonfiction genre. In doing so, they demonstrate the creative and formal adaptability required to write with excellence about any subject matter, and under the circumstances of any subjectivity. Discussion of the ways in which writers have framed, and even critiqued, our interest in athletic events, spectatorship, and athletic beauty. Writers include Joyce Carol Oates, Roland Barthes, David James Duncan, Arnold Rampersad, John Updike, Maxine Kumin, Susan Sterling, Ernest Hemingway, Norman Mailer, Dervla Murphy, Haruki Murakami, Don DeLillo, Henry Louis Gates, Jr., Annie Dillard, John McPhee, and Laura Hillenbrand. Close readings of essays on form and sport, as well as book excerpts. Students will engage in class discussions and write short weekly papers, leading to a more comprehensive project at the end of the quarter.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Evans, J. (PI)

ENGLISH 90W: Writing and War

This introductory, five-unit course is designed for all students interested in reading the literature of and studying the expression of military conflict. Bridging the experiences of Veteran and non-Veteran students will be a central aim of the course and will be reflected in enrollment, reading materials, visiting guests and final narrative project.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ENGLISH 91: Creative Nonfiction

Historical and contemporary as a broad genre including travel and nature writing, memoir, biography, journalism, and the personal essay. Students use creative means to express factual content. May be repeat for credit
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGLISH 91A: ASIAN-AMERICAN AUTOBIOGRAPHY/W (ASNAMST 91A)

This is a dual purpose class: a writing workshop in which you will generate autobiographical vignettes/essays as well as a reading seminar featuring prose from a wide range of contemporary Asian-American writers. Some of the many questions we will consider are: What exactly is `Asian-American memoir? Are there salient subjects and tropes that define the literature? And in what ways do our writerly interactions both resistant and assimilative with a predominantly non-Asian context in turn recreate that context? We'll be working/experimenting with various modes of telling, including personal essay, the epistolary form, verse, and even fictional scenarios.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Lee, C. (PI)

ENGLISH 92: Reading and Writing Poetry

Prerequisite: PWR 1. Issues of poetic craft. How elements of form, music, structure, and content work together to create meaning and experience in a poem. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGLISH 103B: Introduction to Old English Language and Literature

Students will learn the language skills necessary to parse and translate the earliest literature written in the English language. The course will look at how Anglo-Saxon authors used the particularly rich qualities of their vernacular to craft texts that represent and reflect on war¿a principal institution of their medieval society. Our discussion will consider how the conventions of genre and form, as well as contextual forces like religion, cultural tradition, and contemporary history, shaped their writing on the subject.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Ashton, M. (PI)

ENGLISH 112A: Humanities Core: Great Books, Big Ideas -- Europe, Middle Ages and Renaissance (DLCL 12, FRENCH 12, HUMCORE 12)

This three-quarter sequence asks big questions of major texts in the European and American tradition. What is a good life? How should society be organized? Who belongs? How should honor, love, sin, and similar abstractions govern our actions? What duty do we owe to the past and future? The second quarter focuses on the transition from the Middle Ages to Modernity, Europe's re-acquaintance with classical antiquity and its first contacts with the New World. Authors include Dante, Shakespeare, Machiavelli, Cervantes, and Milton.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGLISH 120: The (Un)American Renaissance (COMPLIT 124)

The period between the 1820s and the 1860s has traditionally been called the "American Renaissance": a time when the U.S. nation, and its literature, flourished. The nineteenth century witnessed the publication of a number of important American texts that gave rise to a new national literary tradition, including familiar titles like The Scarlet Letter, Moby-Dick, and Leaves of Grass. Yet, as the nation stretched its geographical coordinates, writers from outside of this predominantly white, male literary heritage issued their own responses to the vision of a "New World Democracy." This course surveys and contextualizes these responses. Reading authors from Native American, Latino/a, African American, and French creole cultures, we'll expand our study of American literature to include writers who interrogate the project of American Democracy from both within and outside of the nation. While analyzing autobiographies, poems, short stories, and speeches we will also learn to read paintings, Native American sign systems, and newspaper sketches, in an exploration of what it meant to be "American" and what counted as "Literature" in the golden era of American Letters.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Hickey, A. (PI)

ENGLISH 127: The Tragedy of Becoming an Adult

We have to grow up. We have no choice in the matter. But what does this lack of choice mean for the way experience growing up¿either as a tragedy or perhaps not? This course will explore various writers¿ approaches to one of the defining genres of the novel, the bildungsroman, the story of finding one¿s place in the world. We all negotiate between our youthful dreams and the compromises of experience. How do we forge our storylines? By choosing a vocation? A romantic partner? By moving from the country to the city, or from one country to another? Reading stories from Victorian and modernist Britain as well as contemporary America, we will question the variety of ways in which the bildungsroman explores questions of identity formation, social changes, and experiments in literary form. Readings include works by Charlotte Brontë, Charles Dickens, D.H. Lawrence, Gertrude Stein, Jeffrey Eugenides, Junot Díaz, and Hayao Miyazaki.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Yamboliev, I. (PI)

ENGLISH 135E: William Blake: A Literary and Visual Exploration of the Illuminated Poetry (ARTHIST 135)

An introduction to the illuminated world of William Blake¿poet, prophet, revolutionary, and visionary artist. The course will address Blake's visual iconography, belief system and ideology, unique mythology, and method of relief etching that allowed him to make every illuminated book a unique work of art, among them, The Songs of Innocence and Experience; The Marriage of Heaven and Hell; The Book of Thel; Visions of the Daughters of Albion; The Book of Urizen; America a Prophecy; and Europe a Prophecy.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Gigante, D. (PI)

ENGLISH 151F: Angelheaded Hipsters: Beat Writers of San Francisco and New York

Reading of central writers of the Beat movement (Ginsberg, Kerouac, di Prima, Snyder, Whalen) as well as some related writers (Creeley, Gunn, Levertov). Issues explored include NY and SF, Buddhism and leftist politics, poetry and jazz. Some exposure to reading poems to jazz accompaniment. Examination of some of the writers and performers growing out of the Beats: Bob Dylan, rock music, especially from San Francisco, and jazz.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Fields, K. (PI)

ENGLISH 152K: Mixed-Race Politics and Culture (AFRICAAM 226, AMSTUD 152K, CSRE 152K)

Today, almost one-third of Americans identify with a racial/ethnic minority group, and more than 9 million Americans identify with multiple races. What are the implications of such diversity for American politics and culture? This course approaches issues of race from an interdisciplinary perspective, employing research in the social sciences and humanities to assess how race shapes perceptions of identity as well as political behavior in 21st-century U.S. Issues surrounding the role of multiculturalism, immigration, acculturation, racial representation, and racial prejudice in American society. Topics include the political and social formation of race; racial representation in the media, arts, and popular culture; the rise and decline of the "one-drop rule" and its effect on political and cultural attachments; the politicization of census categories and the rise of the multiracial movement.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Elam, M. (PI)

ENGLISH 154E: Twentieth-Century Irish Literature

Plays, poems, short stories, and novels. Writers include James Joyce, William Yeats, Mary Lavin, Kate O'Brien,William Trevor, Seamus Heaney, and Samuel Beckett. How the writer can sustain imaginative freedom and literary experiment in the face of a turbulent history.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Boland, E. (PI)

ENGLISH 159: James Baldwin & Twentieth Century Literature (AFRICAAM 159, FEMGEN 159)

Black, gay and gifted, Baldwin was hailed as a "spokesman for the race", although he personally, and controversially, eschewed titles and classifications of all kinds. This course examines his classic novels and essays as well his exciting work across many lesser-examined domains - poetry, music, theatre, sermon, photo-text, children's literature, public media, comedy and artistic collaboration. Placing his work in context with other writers of the 20C (Faulkner, Wright,Morrison) and capitalizing on a resurgence of interest in the writer (NYC just dedicated a year of celebration of Baldwin and there are 2 new journals dedicated to study of Baldwin), the course seeks to capture the power and influence of Baldwin's work during the Civil Rights era as well as his relevance in the "post-race" transnational 21st century, when his prescient questioning of the boundaries of race, sex, love, leadership and country assume new urgency.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Elam, M. (PI)

ENGLISH 159A: Literature and Protest (AFRICAAM 159A, CSRE 159I)

How does literary art get involved in politics? What is the border between propaganda and art? This class examines moments when writers seem suddenly not only to represent politically charged topics and themes, but to have a part in bringing about political change. We¿ll look at case studies from the anti-apartheid movement in South Africa, the American Civil Rights struggle, 19th century Russia, and more.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Bronstein, M. (PI)

ENGLISH 160: Poetry and Poetics

Introduction to the reading of poetry, with emphasis on how the sense of poems is shaped through diction, imagery, and technical elements of verse.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ENGLISH 161: Narrative and Narrative Theory

An introduction to stories and storytelling--that is, to narrative. What is narrative? When is narrative fictional and when non-fictional? How is it done, word by word, sentence by sentence? Must it be in prose? Can it be in pictures? How has storytelling changed over time? Focus on various forms, genres, structures, and characteristics of narrative.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ENGLISH 162W: Writing Intensive Seminar in English (WISE)

In these highly regarded, small-group seminars, students explore unique topics in English language literature, reading select primary texts alongside exemplary critical works and/or other cultural artifacts, while also honing their research and writing skills through series of assignments that culminate in a substantial original research essay. Classes are capped at 8, allowing for individualized attention and rich feedback. Click Schedule below to see individual course titles (in Notes). For fuller details and descriptions, go to https://english.stanford.edu/courses/2017-18-english-162w. Enrollment is by permission. English majors must take at least one WISE to fulfill WIM. Non-majors are welcome, space permitting. Contact the English Department's Student Services Manager, Melanie Ester (melaniee@stanford.edu), for more information.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ENGLISH 167H: The Ethical Gangster

(English majors must register for 5 units) A study of recent developments in understanding human moral psychology using mafia movies to explore the differences between Kantian and Utilitarian moral theory. We will study the greatest hits of gangster fiction and film, from Fielding's Jonathan Wild to The Sopranos.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-EthicReas, WAY-A-II, WAY-ER | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGLISH 172D: Introduction to Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity (CSRE 196C, PSYCH 155, SOC 146, TAPS 165)

How different disciplines approach topics and issues central to the study of ethnic and race relations in the U.S. and elsewhere. Lectures by senior faculty affiliated with CSRE. Discussions led by CSRE teaching fellows. Includes an optional Haas Center for Public Service certified Community Engaged Learning section.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ENGLISH 183E: Self-Impersonation: Fiction, Autobiography, Memoir (COMPLIT 183)

Course will examine the intersecting genres of fiction, autobiography, and memoir. Topics will include the literary construction of selfhood and its constituent categories (gender, race, ethnicity, religion, etc.); the role of language in the development of the self; the relational nature of the self (vis-à-vis the family, "society," God); the cultural status of "individuality"; the concept of childhood; and the role of individual testimony in our understanding of family, religious and national history. In addition to short theoretical works, authors will include Knausgaard, Nabokov, Hoffman, Winterson, Said, Levi, Barthes, and Duras.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Ruttenburg, N. (PI)

ENGLISH 190: Intermediate Fiction Writing

May be taken twice for credit. Lottery. Priority to last quarter/year in school, majors in English with Creative Writing emphasis, and Creative Writing minors. Prerequisite: 90 or 91.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGLISH 190D: Dialogue Writing

For Fiction and Film students. Study how dialogue develops character, reveals information, moves plots forward, and creates tension. Use of short story, novels, graphic novels, and films. Students will write many short assignments, one dialogue scene, and one longer story or script (10-20pages). Priority to Fiction Into Film students, but open to all. Prerequisite: 90.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Clark, H. (PI)

ENGLISH 190F: Fiction into Film

Workshop. For screenwriting students. Story craft, structure, and dialogue. Assignments include short scene creation, character development, and a long story. How fictional works are adapted to screenplays, and how each form uses elements of conflict, time, summary, and scene. Priority to seniors and Film Studies majors. Prerequisite: 90.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGLISH 190T: Special Topics in Intermediate Fiction Writing

Focus on a particular topic or process. Work includes aspects of reading short stories and novels, writing at least 30-50 pages of fiction, and responding to peers' work in workshop. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: 91 or 90.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGLISH 191: Intermediate Creative Nonfiction

Continuation of 91. Workshop. The application of advanced storytelling techniques to fact-based personal narratives, emphasizing organic writing, discovering audience, and publication. Guest lecturers, collaborative writing, and publication of the final project in print, audio, or web formats. Prerequisite: 91 or 90.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGLISH 191DC: DCI Intermediate Memoir Workshop

English 191DC will provide an intermediate-level course in the art and craft of writing memoir. It will build on those strategies for writing with meaning and insight about the events in our lives that were presented in English 91DC. During the term, we will read texts that broadly innovate within and outside of the formal traditions of the memoir form, finding new and exciting ways to represent personal experience. This section will also serve as the continuing examination and practice of the formal elements of the memoir. During the term, Fellows will write, workshop, present to the class, and revise at least two short pieces, one long pieces, and working drafts of excerpts. All workshops will serve as the springboard for our larger class conversation about theme and craft. During the quarter, we will meet in individual conferences. Throughout the quarter, creative work will be assigned in the form of essays, imitations, and revisions. Critical work will be assigned in the form of planning and leading class discussions, and writing and discussing critiques of colleagues¿ essays. A variety of creative prompts, critical exercises, and assigned readings will foster your understanding and appreciation of the memoir form, as well as your growth as a creative writer. Energetic, committed participation is a must.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Evans, J. (PI)

ENGLISH 191T: Special Topics in Intermediate Creative Nonfiction

Workshop. Continuation of 91. Focus is on forms of the essay. Works from across time and nationality for their craft and technique; experimentation with writing exercises. Students read and respond to each other's longer nonfiction projects. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: 91 or 90.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Smith, A. (PI)

ENGLISH 192: Intermediate Poetry Writing

May be taken twice. Lottery. Priority to last quarter/year in school, majors in English with Creative Writing emphasis, and Creative Writing minors. Prerequisite: 92.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGLISH 192T: Topics in Intermediate Poetry Writing

Generation and discussion of student poems. How to recognize a poem's internal structure; how to seek models for work. Students submit portfolio for group critique. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: ENGLISH 92.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGLISH 192V: The Occasions of Poetry

Taught by the Mohr Visiting Poet. Prerequisite: 92. Permission number required to enroll.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGLISH 194: Individual Research

See section above on Undergraduate Programs, Opportunities for Advanced Work, Individual Research.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Ruttenburg, N. (PI)

ENGLISH 195B: How to Write a Great Essay: A Writing Bootcamp for Undergraduates

The course will be a practical workshop for undergraduates on how to improve essay-writing skills. we will focus on the finer points of vocabulary, grammar, mechanics, logic, timing, intellectual precision; how to connect with (and delight) an audience; how to magnify a theme; how to deflect counter-arguments; how to develop your own sophisticated authorial 'style'; how to write sentences (and papers!) your reader will care about and admire and maybe even remember.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Castle, T. (PI)

ENGLISH 197: Seniors Honors Essay

In two quarters.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Staveley, A. (PI)

ENGLISH 198: Individual Work

Undergraduates who wish to study a subject or area not covered by regular courses may, with consent, enroll for individual work under the supervision of a member of the department. 198 may not be used to fulfill departmental area or elective requirements without consent. Group seminars are not appropriate for 198.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGLISH 198L: Individual Work: Levinthal Tutorial

Undergraduate writers work individually with visiting Stegner Fellows in poetry, fiction, and if available, nonfiction. Students design their own curriculum; Stegner Fellows act as writing mentors and advisers. Prerequisites: 90, 91, or 92; submitted manuscript.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGLISH 199: Senior Independent Essay

Open, with department approval, to seniors majoring in non-Honors English who wish to work throughout the year on a 10,000 word critical or scholarly essay. Applicants submit a sample of their expository prose, proposed topic, and bibliography to the Director of Undergraduate Studies before preregistration in May of the junior year. Each student accepted is responsible for finding a department faculty adviser. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ENGLISH 201: The Bible and Literature

Differences in translations of the Bible into English. Recognizing and interpreting biblical allusion in texts from the medieval to modern periods. Readings from the Bible and from British, Canadian, American, and African American, and African literature in English.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ENGLISH 233: Baroque and Neobaroque (COMPLIT 301, ILAC 293E)

The literary, cultural, and political implications of the 17th-century phenomenon formed in response to the conditions of the 16th century including humanism, absolutism, and early capitalism, and dispersed through Europe, the Americas, and Asia. If the Baroque is a universal code of this period, how do its vehicles, such as tragic drama, Ciceronian prose, and metaphysical poetry, converse with one another? The neobaroque as a complex reaction to the remains of the baroque in Latin American cultures, with attention to the mode in recent Brazilian literary theory and Mexican poetry.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Greene, R. (PI)

ENGLISH 287G: A Woman's Life: 20th- (and 21st-) Century Memoirs by Women (FEMGEN 287G)

Why do women write memoirs? Why has the memoir form become such a popular genre for American female authors? What do such books reveal, More broadly, about the condition of women in Contemporary Society? We will approach these questions by reading autobiographical works by some if not all of the following writers: Gertrude Stein, Joan Didion, Kathryn Harris, Audre Lorde, Patti Smith, Lucy Grealy, Michelle Tea, Jeannette Walls, Carrie Fisher, and Alison Bechdel.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Castle, T. (PI)

ENGLISH 290: Advanced Fiction Writing

Workshop critique of original short stories or novel. Prerequisites: manuscript, consent of instructor, and 190-level fiction workshop. May be repeat for credit
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Antopol, M. (PI)

ENGLISH 293: Literary Translation (DLCL 293)

An overview of translation theories and practices over time. The aesthetic, ethical, and political questions raised by the act and art of translation and how these pertain to the translator's tasks. Discussion of particular translation challenges and the decision processes taken to address these issues. Coursework includes assigned theoretical readings, comparative translations, and the undertaking of an individual translation project.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Santana, C. (PI)

ENGLISH 300: Medieval Methodologies (DLCL 300, MUSIC 300C)

An introduction to the essential tool-kit for medievalists, this course will give all medievalists a great head start in knowing how to access and interpret major works and topics in the field. Stanford's medieval faculty will explain the key sources and methods in the major disciplines from History to Religion, French to Arabic, English to Chinese, and Art History to German and Music. In so doing, students will be introduced to the breadth and interdisciplinary potential of Medieval Studies. A workshop devoted to Digital Technologies and Codicology/Palaeography will offer elementary training in these fundamental skills.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Griffiths, F. (PI)

ENGLISH 307D: Bringing the Archives to Life

Introduction to the critical skills required for working in the archives. Students will be taught the core methods for working with archival sources, and will be trained in the transcription, editing, interpretation, and publication of primary textual materials. Our textual materials will be generically varied and chronologically diverse, and we shall move from late medieval to contemporary holdings in Stanford University Library¿s Special Collections, in other archives at Stanford, and in local private holdings.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Treharne, E. (PI)

ENGLISH 313: Performance and Performativity (FEMGEN 313, TAPS 313)

Performance theory through topics including: affect/trauma, embodiment, empathy, theatricality/performativity, specularity/visibility, liveness/disappearance, belonging/abjection, and utopias and dystopias. Readings from Schechner, Phelan, Austin, Butler, Conquergood, Roach, Schneider, Silverman, Caruth, Fanon, Moten, Anzaldúa, Agamben, Freud, and Lacan. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Menon, J. (PI)

ENGLISH 317A: Irony

Varieties of literary irony from Plato through the present. Topics include: verbal, dramatic, situational, and romantic irony. Focus will be on questions about what irony is and why writers use it. How does irony go astray? What kinds of topics seem to require irony? How does irony work? Writers include Chaucer, Swift, Thomas Mann, J.M. Coetzee and David Foster Wallace.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ENGLISH 333: Philosophy, Literature, and the Arts Core Seminar (DLCL 333, PHIL 333)

This course serves as the Core Seminar for the PhD Minor in Philosophy, Literature, and the Arts. It introduces students to a wide range of topics at the intersection of philosophy with literary and arts criticism. In this year's installment of the seminar, we will focus on issues about the nature of fiction, about the experience of appreciation and what it does for us, about the ethical consequences of imaginative fictions, and about different conceptions of the importance of the arts in life more broadly. The seminar is intended for graduate students. It is suitable for theoretically ambitious students of literature and the arts, philosophers with interests in value theory, aesthetics, and topics in language and mind, and other students with strong interest in the psychological importance of engagement with the arts. May be repeat for credit
Terms: Win | Units: 2-4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGLISH 334B: Concepts of Modernity II: Culture, Aesthetics, and Society in the Age of Globalization (MTL 334B)

Emphasis on world-system theory, theories of coloniality and power, and aesthetic modernity/postmodernity in their relation to culture broadly understood.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Rasberry, V. (PI)

ENGLISH 354: Scalar Reading

The computational study of literature allows us to analyze literature across vastly different scales: from extremely detailed word frequencies, to massive archives of texts. But how does criticism operate at these two extremes? How do new methods of analysis respond to the theories of reading offered by literary criticism? In this class, we will compare the scalar modes of reading that our new methods offer with historical theories of critical reading practices, from hermeneutics, to close reading, and beyond.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Algee-Hewitt, M. (PI)

ENGLISH 390: Graduate Fiction Workshop

For Stegner fellows in the writing program. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

ENGLISH 392: Graduate Poetry Workshop

For Stegner fellows in the writing program. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

ENGLISH 394: Independent Study

Preparation for first-year Ph.D. qualifying examination and third year Ph.D. oral exam.
Terms: Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

ENGLISH 395: Ad Hoc Graduate Seminar

Three or more graduate students who wish in the following quarter to study a subject or an area not covered by regular courses and seminars may plan an informal seminar and approach a member of the department to supervise it.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGLISH 396R: Old and Modern(ist) Reading Group

This two-quarter-long reading group will alternate from week-to-week between Old English Biblical and Elegaic Poetry and David Jones¿s twentieth-century transnational Modernist masterpiece, "Anathemata" (which W. H. Auden called very probably the finest long poem written in English in this century). Students can choose to join biweekly for just Old English (in the original language) or just David Jones, or complete both sets of allied reading.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Treharne, E. (PI)

ENGLISH 398: Research Course

A special subject of investigation under supervision of a member of the department. Thesis work is not registered under this number.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-18 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGLISH 398L: Literary Lab (COMPLIT 398L)

Gathering and analyzing data, constructing hypotheses and designing experiments to test them, writing programs [if needed], preparing visuals and texts for articles or conferences. Requires a year-long participation in the activities of the Lab.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 2-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Algee-Hewitt, M. (PI)

ENGLISH 398R: Revision and Development of a Paper

Students revise and develop a paper under the supervision of a faculty member with a view to possible publication.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 4-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGLISH 398W: Orals, Publication and Dissertation Workshop

For third- and fourth-year graduate students in English. Strategies for studying for and passing the oral examination, publishing articles, and for writing and researching dissertations and dissertation proposals. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Moya, P. (PI)

ENGLISH 399: Thesis

For M.A. students only. Regular meetings with thesis advisers required.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Orgel, S. (PI)
© Stanford University | Terms of Use | Copyright Complaints