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GERMAN 80N: Modern Conservatives

How do conservatives respond to the modern world? How do they find a balance between tradition and freedom, or between stability and change? This seminar will examine selections from some conservative and some classically liberal writers that address these questions. At the center of the course are thinkers who left Germany and Austria before the Second World War: Friedrich Hayek, Leo Strauss and Hannah Arendt. We will also look at earlier European writers, such Edmund Burke and Friedrich Nietzsche, as well as some recent American thinkers. Taught in English.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

GERMAN 88: Germany in 5 Words

This course explores German history, culture and politics by tracing five (largely untranslatable) words and exploring the debates they have engendered in Germany over the past 200 years. This course is intended as preparation for students wishing to spend a quarter at the Bing Overseas Studies campus in Berlin, but is open to everyone. Taught in English.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

GERMAN 88Q: Gateways to the World: Germany in 5 Words

This course explores German history, culture and politics by tracing five (largely untranslatable) words and exploring the debates they have engendered in Germany over the past 200 years. This course is intended as preparation for students wishing to spend a quarter at the Bing Overseas Studies campus in Berlin, but is open to everyone. Preference to Sophomores. Taught in English.
Terms: not given next year | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

GERMAN 104: Resistance Writings in Nazi Germany

This course focuses on documents generated by nonmilitary resistance groups during the period of National Socialism. Letters, essays, diaries, and statements on ethics from the Bonhoeffer and Scholl families form the core of the readings. The resistance novel, Every Man Dies Alone, is also included. Texts will be read as historical documents, reflections of German thought, statements of conscience, attempts to maintain normal relationships with others in the face of great risk, as poetic works, and as guides for the development of an ethical life. Taught in English.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ER | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

GERMAN 105: Going Medieval: Introduction to Freiburg, Germany, and its Surrounding Region (DLCL 105)

This course offers an introduction to materials that are pertinent to the BOSP summer seminar "Going Medieval" offered in summer 2015. It is a required course for participants of the seminar.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

GERMAN 109: The End of Europe (as we know it) - Germany and the Future of the European Union

Europe is struggling with the impact of the sovereign debt crisis of the Eurozone, mass migration, political extremism and xenophobia, external and internal security challenges, as well as political and social needs for reform to mention only some of the most pressing problems. The European Union, a project of an ever closer union of European states with currently 28 members started with the promise to provide peace, stability and prosperity. This narrative attracted new members in five enlargement rounds since the 1970s while today Eurosceptic parties, separatist movements as well as internal and external critics of the EU question the European integration project as such. nnThe course starts with the narrative of the success story of European integration and its achievements. This is followed by an analysis of current crises and future problems. In a third step we will discuss consequences and strategies to deal with challenges for Europe as a whole, as well as the EU and its members in particular. The course will follow ongoing debates within and outside of the EU. It includes global reflections on the state European situation and it makes comparisons with responses to similar challenges in other parts of the world.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Bruckner, U. (PI)

GERMAN 113N: Theatre and Politics

The theatre is a public forum where politics is both represented and enacted. In this seminar we will examine four theatrical artists who have wrestled with urgent political questions of their time and ours: William Shakespeare, Georg Büchner, Bertolt Brecht, and Anna Deveare Smith. nnQuestions we will consider include: How does Shakespeare¿s Hamlet raise questions about a sovereign¿s right to rule? What might a play such as Büchner¿s Danton¿s Death¿set during the one of the bloodiest periods of the French Revolution¿suggest about the relationship between terrorism and reason? What does a musical such as Brecht¿s Threepenny Opera demonstrate about strategies of mass manipulation? And how could a performance piece such as Smith¿s Twilight: Los Angeles help us better understand the dynamics of police brutality and urban riot? nnIn this course, we will read seven plays, delve into their cultural contexts, and watch film and live versions of them, including field trips to at area theatres. We will also try our hand at staging some scenes in class, in order to get a better sense of the sorts of choices these plays require. Your assignments will include short papers and regular postings on an online discussion board. All readings and discussions will be in English, and no prior theatrical experience is necessary.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

GERMAN 116: Writing About Germany: New Topics, New Genres

Writing about various topics in German Studies. Topics based on student interests: current politics, economics, European affairs, start-ups in Germany. Intensive focus on writing. Students may write on their experience at Stanford in Berlin or their internship. Fulfills the WIM requirement for German Studies majors.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Landry, O. (PI)

GERMAN 118N: From Mozart to Metal, Germany in 99 Songs

This course explores 200 years of German history and culture through popular songs -- the good, the bad and the very, very goofy. From songs composed by classical composers, via folksongs and operettas, all the way to punk, hip-hop, techno and heavy metal, this course explores the evolution of German popular culture and history. Prerequisite: 1 year of German
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

GERMAN 119: Modern Theatre (GERMAN 319, TAPS 119, TAPS 319)

Modern theatre in Europe and the US, with a focus on the most influential works from roughly 1880 to the present. What were the conventions of theatrical practice that modern theatre displaced? What were the principal innovations of modern playwriting, acting, stage design, and theatrical architecture? How did modern theatrical artists wrestle with the revolutionary transformations of the modern age? Plays by Büchner, Ibsen, Strindberg, Shaw, Chekhov, Wilde, Wedekind, Treadwell, Pirandello, Brecht, O¿Neill, Beckett, Smith, Parks, and Nottage.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Smith, M. (PI)

GERMAN 120: Contemporary Politics in Germany

This course provides an opportunity to engage with issues and actors, politicians and parties in contemporary Germany, while building German language abilities. We will work with current events texts, news reports, speeches and websites. Course goals include building analytic and interpretive capacities of political topics in today's Europe, including the European Union, foreign policy, and environmentalism. Differences between US and German political culture are a central topic. At least one year German language study required.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

GERMAN 120N: The Brothers Grimm and Their Fairy Tales

Historical, biographical, linguistic, and literary look at the Kinder- and Hausmarchen of Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm. Readings from the fairy tales, plus materials in other media such as film and the visual arts. Four short essays, one or two oral reports. Preference to Freshmen; class then opens to all. Fulfills WIM for German majors (must be taken for letter grade.) In German.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

GERMAN 120Q: Contemporary Politics in Germany

This course provides an opportunity to engage with issues and actors, politicians and parties in contemporary Germany, while building German language abilities. We will work with current events texts, news reports, speeches and websites. Course goals include building analytic and interpretive capacities of political topics in today's Europe, including the European Union, foreign policy, and environmentalism. Differences between US and German political culture are a central topic. At least one year German language study required.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

GERMAN 121: Why So Serious? German Earnestness and its Cultural Origin

The stereotype of Germans having no sense of humor and being overly serious is a very persistent one. This course searches for the origins of this cultural stereotype and explores how this mentality manifests itself in modern German thought, literature, cinema, and popular culture. Do Germans find a particular joy in entertaining serious and depressive thoughts? Can we distinguish between different facets and styles of `genuinely German¿ seriousness? And finally, can we understand German culture better through an understanding of their genuine seriousness? Materials include works by: the brothers Grimm, Schopenhauer, Nietzsche, Murnau, Benn, Fassbinder, Bernhard, Adorno, Haneke. Taught in German. Prerequisite: Gerlang 1-3, or equivalent.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Fischer, A. (PI)

GERMAN 123: German Culture and Film

This course has two primary goals. First, it is designed to provide students with a visual and linguistic foundation for discussing and writing about German film from the Weimar period to the present. To that end we will review important genres, directors, and technological developments in the history of German film. Second, using film as a lens, we will examine several key moments in German cultural history from the 1920s to the present. Certain themes will reoccur throughout the course, including gender, the city, technology, violence, and social crisis. All materials and class discussion in German.(Meets Writing-in-the-Major requirement)
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

GERMAN 124: Introduction to German Lyric Poetry

Introduction to lyric poetry in German from the 18th century to the present. Readings include poems by Goethe, Holderlin, Brentano, Eichendorff, Heine, Rilke, Trakl, Celan, Brecht. Ways of thinking about and thinking with poetry. Focus on poetic form, voice, figural language, and the interaction of sensory registers. Taught in German, with attention to discussion and writing skills. Prerequisite: Gerlang 1-3 or equivalent.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

GERMAN 126: Old Stories, New Media: Great German Tales and their Adaptations

There are some characters that we see again and again: the love-struck artist, the mad genius, and the valiant hero. Where do these tropes come from? How do they evolve through history? This course will survey German history through the eyes of some of its most well-known stories. We will explore how audience, medium, cultural ideals, and historical changes can transform the meaning of a narrative over time. The central aim of this course is to provide students with an analytical framework with which to approach an unfamiliar work of art or literature. The course also aims to improve students¿ German language proficiency and give students a broad understanding of German intellectual history. Taught in German.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

GERMAN 127: Modernity, Memory, Mourning: 20th Century German Short Fiction

Through a sampling of short stories and novellas from 1918 to 1952, this course will explore major historical and cultural questions related to Germany in the early 20th century. Students will develop an understanding of recent German history and of how German writers have chosen to engage with this history in various ways. Themes will include the impact of modernity on the individual, violence and war, fascism and its effect on personal agency, exile and mourning, memory and trauma, and tradition and its breakdown. Authors include Kafka, Mann, Seghers, and Böll. Readings and discussion in German.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

GERMAN 128: Writing with Kafka (GERMAN 328)

This course explores Franz Kafka his literary work and biography, its themes and his contemporary significance through an array of heterogeneous materials and creative practices. Discussions of Kafka's short writings, correspondences and diary entries; feuilletons about Kafka, film and radio adaptations of his works. Exploring ways to make Krafka's creativity productive for their writing, students may study topics such as questions of textual criticism, humor, parody, the uncanny and the Kafkaesque in Kafka and today. Throughout, the seminar will tease out historical and cultural backgrounds of Kafka's work and life, and trace the crisis of modernity in his writings. Readings, discussions and writing creative projects and analytical writing in German.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Knuepling, F. (PI)

GERMAN 128N: Medicine, Modernism, and Mysticism in Thomas Mann's the Magic Mountain

Published in 1924, The Magic Mountain is a novel of education, tracing the intellectual growth of a budding engineer through a maze of intellectual encounters during a seven- year sojourn in a sanatorium set high in the Swiss Alps. It engages with the key themes of modernism: the relativity of time, the impact of psychoanalysis, the power of myth, and an extended dispute between an optimistic belief in progress and a pessimistic vision of human nature. Through its detailed discussion of disease (tuberculosis), this remarkable text connects the study of medicine to the humanities. There will be an exploration of this rich and profound novel both as a document of early twentieth-century Europe and as a commentary on the possibilities of education that are urgent for liberal arts education today. Taught in English.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

GERMAN 129: Madness: Mental Institutions in German Literature, Film, and Video Games

What does a narrator who declares himself "insane" make us reevaluate as readers or viewers? How do literary texts portray sanatoriums and the people who inhabit them? From the unreliable narrator to the sudden twist ending, madness is often made into a literary trope; the insane asylum, too, becomes a symbol of broader socio-political concerns. This course looks at the representations of clinics and sanatoriums in classic German texts of the 20th century, engaging critically with these representations and the ways in which insanity and illness are depicted. We will compare texts from several genres (novel, film, drama, or video game), to see how the rules change depending on the form used. Texts will include Robert Wiene's masterful expressionist film "Das Cabinet des Doktor Caligari"; excerpts from Thomas Mann¿s "Der Zauberberg"; excerpts from Gunter Grass' postwar masterpiece "Die Blechtrommel"; Friedrich Dürrenmatt's "Die Physiker", a coldwar theatrical screed on the dangers of science in a nuclear age; and the mysterious point-and-click adventure game "Edna bricht aus." Taught in German. Prerequisite: GERLANG 3 or permission of instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Kagen, M. (PI)

GERMAN 130N: Nobel Prize Winners in German Literature

Readings from some of the best German-language authors, including Thomas Mann, Hermann Hesse, Heinrich Boll and Herta Muller. How imaginative literature engages with history, and how great authors address the major questions in politics and philosophy in modern Germany. Taught in German. German language equivalent to high school AP.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Berman, R. (PI)

GERMAN 131: What is German Literature?

In the age of the digital and the hypervisual, why do we still need literature? Is literature the key to a language and a culture? In this course we will reconsider literature as a medium, a cultural form, and a political tool. Engaging with different types of German-language texts from the 18th century to the present, we will ask what literature can do and where it can take us. Short stories, poetry, cinema, industrial music, comics, letters, theory, and new media: in this course we will explore literature in many (unexpected) forms. Taught in German. Prerequisite: One year of German language at Stanford or equivalent.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Landry, O. (PI)

GERMAN 132: Dynasties, Dictators and Democrats: History and Politics in Germany (COMPLIT 132A)

Key moments in German history through documents: personal accounts, political speeches and texts, and literary works. The course begins with the Prussian monarchy and proceeds to the crisis years of the French Revolution. Documents from the 1848 revolution and the age of Bismarck and German unification follow. World War I and its impact on Germany, including the rise of Hitler, as well as the aftermath, divided Germany in the Cold War through the fall of the Berlin Wall. Taught in German.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Bruckner, U. (PI)

GERMAN 133: Marx, Nietzsche, Freud

We read and discuss selections from works by the key master thinkers who have exerted a lasting influence by debunking long-cherished beliefs. Do these authors uphold or repudiate Enlightenment notions of rationality, autonomy and progress? How do they assess the achievements of civilization? How do their works illuminate the workings of power in social and political contexts? Readings and discussion in German.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Landry, O. (PI)

GERMAN 136: Refugees, Politics and Culture in Contemporary Germany (GERMAN 336)

Responses to refugees and immigration to Germany against the backdrop of German history and in the context of domestic and European politics. Topics include: cultural difference and integration processes, gender roles, religious traditions, populism and neo-nationalism. Reading knowledge of German, another European language, or an immigrant language will be useful for research projects, but not required.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Berman, R. (PI)

GERMAN 140: German Sports Culture and History

The course highlights specificities of sports in Germany and thus provides a unique point of access for understanding German culture in past and present. Concepts of competition and performance will be examined, as well as the relations between sports and politics in different periods of modern German history. Special attention will be given to soccer, but boxing, cycling, gymnastics (Turnen), and other Olympic sports will be studied as well. Materials will include theoretical and literary texts in English and German, media representations of athletic contests. To improve writing skills students will write a weekly essay on various phenomena. Language: German, requirement: one year of college German or equivalent.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

GERMAN 150: Masterpieces: Kafka (COMPLIT 114, JEWISHST 145)

This class will address major works by Franz Kafka and consider Kafka as a modernist writer whose work reflects on modernity. We will also examine the role of Kafka's themes and poetics in the work of contemporary writers.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

GERMAN 151: Social Market Economy: Facing Globalization and Digitization (GERMAN 351, PUBLPOL 161, PUBLPOL 261)

Examines the German political economic model in the face of current challenges. Topics include the legacy of Ordoliberalism, management of systemic risks, regulatory frameworks for a digital economy, new competition policies and the right to be forgotten on the internet. Required readings in English, optional supplementary readings in German.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

GERMAN 154: Poetic Thinking Across Media (COMPLIT 154B, COMPLIT 354B, GERMAN 354, JEWISHST 144B)

Even before Novalis claimed that the world must be romanticized, thinkers, writers, and artists wanted to perceive the human and natural world poetically. The pre- and post-romantic poetic modes of thinking they created are the subject of this course. Readings include Ecclestias, Zhaozhou Congshen, Montaigne, Nietzsche, Kafka, Benjamin, Arendt, and Sontag. This course will also present poetic thinking in the visual arts--from the expressionism of Ingmar Bergman to the neo-romanticism of Gerhard Richter.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

GERMAN 175: CAPITALS: How Cities Shape Cultures, States, and People (COMPLIT 100, DLCL 100, FRENCH 175, HISTORY 206E, ILAC 175, ITALIAN 175, URBANST 153)

This course takes students on a trip to eight capital cities, at different moments in time: Renaissance Florence, Golden Age Madrid, Colonial Mexico City, Enlightenment and Romantic Paris, Existential and Revolutionary St. Petersburg, Roaring Berlin, Modernist Vienna, and bustling Buenos Aires. While exploring each place in a particular historical moment, we will also consider the relations between culture, power, and social life. How does the cultural life of a country intersect with the political activity of a capital? How do large cities shape our everyday experience, our aesthetic preferences, , and our sense of history? Why do some cities become cultural capitals? Primary materials for this course will consist of literary, visual, sociological, and historical documents (in translation); authors we will read include Boccaccio, Lope de Vega, Sor Juana, Montesquieu, Baudelaire, Dostoyevsky, Irmgard Keun, Freud, and Borges.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

GERMAN 177: What is Love? Answers from Psychology, Philosophy, and Literature

This course explores how different fields in the humanities and social sciences approach the question of love. We will explore key works of philosophy (e.g. Plato, Foucault), psychology (attachment theory, moral foundations theory), and fiction (poetry, novel, film) to understand how these fields can work together to deepen our understanding of love in society, culture, and in our own lives. Readings include Plato¿s Symposium, Freud¿s "Beyond the Pleasure Principle," Lewis et al.¿s "A General Theory of Love," and Bowlby¿s "Attachment and Human Development." Taught in English.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

GERMAN 181: Philosophy and Literature (CLASSICS 42, COMPLIT 181, ENGLISH 81, FRENCH 181, ITALIAN 181, PHIL 81, SLAVIC 181)

Required gateway course for Philosophical and Literary Thought; crosslisted in departments sponsoring the Philosophy and Literature track. Majors should register in their home department; non-majors may register in any sponsoring department. Introduction to major problems at the intersection of philosophy and literature, with particular focus on the question of value: what, if anything, does engagement with literary works do for our lives? Issues include aesthetic self-fashioning, the paradox of tragedy, the paradox of caring, the truth-value of fiction, metaphor, authorship, irony, make-believe, expression, edification, clarification, and training. Readings are drawn from literature and film, philosophical theories of art, and stylistically interesting works of philosophy. Authors may include Sophocles, Chaucer, Dickinson, Proust, Woolf, Borges, Beckett, Kundera, Charlie Kaufman; Barthes, Foucault, Nussbaum, Walton, Nehamas; Plato, Montaigne, Schopenhauer, Nietzsche, and Sartre. Taught in English.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

GERMAN 182: War and Warfare in Germany

Survey of Germany at war through historical, theoretical and literary accounts. War in the international system and the role of technology. Religious wars, rationalization of warfare, violence and politics, terrorism. War films, such as All Quiet on the Western Front. Readings by authors such as Clausewitz, Jünger, Remarque, Schimtt, and Arendt. Taught in English.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

GERMAN 184: Technology, Innovation, and the History of the Book

An historical perspective on the intellectual and social impact of developments in information technology will be examined. Focusing on the evolution of media from scrolls to codices to printed books we will look at the social, historical, cultural, and economic sources and ramifications of innovation in media and information technology, and explore why such innovation occurs in certain places and within certain social groups and not others. Examples draw from German cultural history, e.g. Gutenberg and the printing press, but also from the broader European history of the book. Students will have the opportunity to work with historical materials from Special Collections. Taught in English.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

GERMAN 190: German Capstone: Reading Franz Kafka (COMPLIT 111, COMPLIT 311C, GERMAN 390, JEWISHST 147, JEWISHST 349)

This class will address major works by Franz Kafka and consider Kafka as a modernist writer whose work reflects on modernity. We will also examine the role of Kafka's themes and poetics in the work of contemporary writers. (Meets Writing-in-the-Major requirement)
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

GERMAN 191: German Capstone Project

Each student participates in a capstone interview and discussion with a panel of the German Studies faculty on topics related to German cultural and literary analysis. In prepration for the interview/discussion, students submit written answers to a set of questions based on several authentic cultural texts in German. The written answers, normally in English, should be well-formed and coherent. Within the interview/discussion, students must demonstrate a further understanding of the topic(s) posed, through cogent argument.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Starkey, K. (PI)

GERMAN 199: Individual Work

Repeatable for Credit. Instructor Consent Required
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-12 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

GERMAN 200: The Ballad Tradition (COMPLIT 227A)

This team-taught cross-disciplinary course traces the history and aesthetics of the ballad in German, English, and Scottish literature, from the 18th century to the early 20th century. No knowledge of German is required, but reading knowledge is a plus.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

GERMAN 208: Medieval Sensory Experience (DLCL 208)

In this seminar we will explore the variety of ways that sensory experience can be communicated through material culture. How did objects shape experience, and how was experience imprinted on objects? To answer these questions, we will move beyond narrative description to trace experiences that were not easily communicated or recreated, and that were ephemeral. We will discuss recent work across disciplines on the emotions, object history, experience, and the senses. All readings will be in English.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

GERMAN 217: The Poetry of Friedrich Holderlin (COMPLIT 217)

A working through of the complex prosodic forms, existential and political concerns, and poetological reflections of both the most past-oriented and most pathbreaking German poet of the late eighteenth and early nineteenth century. A comprehensive introduction that will attempt to develop an innovative view in which Holderlin will appear as one of the founding figures of literary Modernity. Knowledge of German desirable but participation through English translations will be possible.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

GERMAN 218: Central European Literature

Central Europe is not a clearly defined region so much as an idea debated with particular intensity in the successor states of the Austro-Hungarian monarchy. Part reality part fantasy, "Central Europe" refers to a contested space between East and West, between cosmopolitanism and provincial narrowness, a space whose diversity has fostered cultural creativity, political conflict and utopian fantasy. Our survey will focus on fiction, memoires and essayistic commentary from the successor states of the Austro-Hungarian monarchy. It will comprise the dissolution of the empire, the interwar years, the Cold War decades and the postcommunist era. Attention to the predicament of small nations, "minor" literatures and cultural cross-pollination. Authors include Musil, Kafka, Roth, Kosztolányi, Márai, Hasek, Svevo, Kis, Torberg, Hrabal, Kundera, Esterházy, Magris. Discussion and readings in English.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

GERMAN 220: German Literature 1: How Stories are Told (ca. 1170-1600) (GERMAN 320)

This seminar offers a survey of medieval and early modern German literature and culture from ca.800 to 1600. This year we will focus primarily on heroic epic and tales of fortune. Most texts are available only in German. Advanced reading knowledge of German required. Discussion in English.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 1-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

GERMAN 221: German Literature 2: Selfhood and History (COMPLIT 321A, GERMAN 321)

How the literature of the period between 1750 and 1900 gives voice to new conceptions of selfhood and articulates the emergent self understanding of modernity. Responses to unprecedented historical experiences such as the French Revolution and the ensuing wars, changes in the understanding of nature, the crisis of foundations, and the persistence of theological motifs. Lessing, Herder, Goethe, Schiller, Holderlin, Kleist, Heine, Buchner, Keller, and Fontane. Taught in English, readings in German. (Note: Fulfills DLCL 325 for AY 1415 for the PhD Minor in the Humanities)
Terms: not given this year | Units: 1-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

GERMAN 222: German Literature 3: Myth and Modernity (COMPLIT 222A, GERMAN 322)

Masters of German 20th- and 21st-Century literature and philosophy as they present aesthetic innovation and confront the challenges of modern technology, social alienation, manmade catastrophes, and imagine the future. Readings include Nietzsche, Freud, Rilke, Musil, Brecht, Kafka, Doeblin, Benjamin, Juenger, Arendt, Musil, Mann, Adorno, Celan, Grass, Bachmann, Bernhardt, Wolf, and Kluge. Taught in English. Undergraduates enroll in 222 for 5 units, graduate students enroll in 322 for 8 units.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 1-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

GERMAN 223: GERMANY BETWEEN EAST AND WEST

A consideration of German political culture and its contradictory orientations toward alternative poles: the Russian East and the American West. How historical traditions inform current debates, such as the response to the Ukraine crisis. Conflicts between liberal and populist paradigms, enlightenment and romantic legacies. Germany and its geopolitical imagination. The German image of Russia. Texts such as Th. Mann, ¿The German Republic,¿ Carl Schmitt, Land and Sea, Wolf, Divided Heaven, and documents of contemporary popular culture.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

GERMAN 230: Medieval and Early Modern German Literature (GERMAN 330)

This seminar offers a survey of medieval and early modern German literature and culture from ca.800 to 1600. This year we will focus primarily on heroic epic and tales of fortune. Most texts are available only in German. Advanced reading knowledge of German required. Discussion in English.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Starkey, K. (PI)

GERMAN 231: German Literature (1700-1900) (GERMAN 331)

How the literature of the period between 1750 and 1900 gives voice to new conceptions of selfhood and articulates the emergent self understanding of modernity. Responses to unprecedented historical experiences such as the French Revolution and the ensuing wars, changes in the understanding of nature, the crisis of foundations, and the persistence of theological motifs. Lessing, Herder, Goethe, Schiller, Holderlin, Kleist, Heine, Buchner, Keller, and Fontane. Taught in English, readings in German.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Berman, R. (PI)

GERMAN 232: German Literature 3: Modernity and the Unspeakable (GERMAN 332)

Masterpieces of German literature, drama, and film from the first half of the 20th century. Particular focus on modernism and the crisis of language. What urgent truths (whether psychological, political, spiritual, or sexual) cannot be expressed, and how do art and dreams attempt to speak the unspeakable? Readings and viewings include works by Hofmannsthal, Schnitzler, Freud, Wedekind, Mann, Musil, Kafka, Toller, Höch, Rilke, Schoenberg, Riefensthal, Benjamin, and Brecht. Taught in English.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Smith, M. (PI)

GERMAN 239: Queer Theory (FEMGEN 239)

Do we really need a theory in order to be queer? Queer Theory emerged in response to feminist thought, and the study of the history of sexuality, building on their insights, but also uncovering their blind spots. Without Queer Theory, few of the discourses around desire, power and gender identity that we take for granted on college campuses today would exist. Yet there is also a real risk that reality has left the theory behind. In this course, we will try to answer the question: What do we need queer theory for? Do we still need it? And if so, of what kind? The course is designed to introduce students to core texts of queer theory, and to connect them to current debates, be this around trans rights, the representation of homosexuality or the fight against campus sexual assault.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Daub, A. (PI)

GERMAN 240: Short Fiction as Genre

Exploration of various short fictional forms in German literature and their narrative capacities. Selections from the eighteenth century to the present.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

GERMAN 244: Religious and Gender Identity in Postmigrant Theatre (GERMAN 344)

This course will center around three recent theatre plays associated under the auspices of what has been called Germany's postmigrant theatre: Günther Senkel and Feridun Zaimo¿lu's Black Virgins (Schwarze Jungfrauen), Nurkan Erpulat and Jens Hillje's Crazy Blood (Verrücktes Blut), and Sasha Marianna Salzmann's Mothertongue (Muttersprache Mameloschn). Postmigrant theatre has been ushered in as a theatre movement that has successfully established and institutionalized new aesthetics, narratives, and political tools for artists of color and of different linguistic backgrounds in Germany. As a space where diversity is both explored and affirmed, postmigrant theatre and the abovementioned plays in particular attend to the intersections and tensions of religion and gender. Engaging contemporary political and social debates about representations of gender and Islam and queer identity and Judaism in the West, we will examine how theatre and performance forge new spaces of encounter, community, and even identity. Together with these plays, we will read texts from theatre and performance theories, women of color feminisms, gender performativity, homonormativity, and queer and trans of color critique. This course is designed as an introduction to postmigrant theatre and its theatrical intervention in contemporary thinking on gender and religion.nNOTE: This course must be taken for a letter grade and a minimum of 3 units to be eligible for Ways credit.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Landry, O. (PI)

GERMAN 245: German Idealist and Romantic Aesthetics

Focus on influential theories of aesthetic experience as an autonomous cultural domain that supplements science and morality. How the discovery of beauty and sublimity in nature led to an unprecedented celebration of art as the highest form of human activity. The problem of the relation between aesthetic experience and conceptual understanding. Readings by Kant, Schiller, Friedrich Schlegel, Schelling, Hegel, and more recent responses to their works. Taught in English.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

GERMAN 246: Hegel's Phenomenology of Spirit

Hegel's groundbreaking work models the mind's efforts to understand itself and tells a historically rich story of the evolution of social forms of life. The book begins with basic sensory awareness and ends with the recognition that thought is not finite and constrained by an inert reality but absolutely free, the only source of authority for modern subjects. Topics include the question of whether the human standpoint is inherently limited and fixed, the role of history, knowledge and agency, political conflict and power, rationality and religion, the ancient and the modern world.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

GERMAN 250: Humanities Education in the Changing University (COMPLIT 275, DLCL 320)

Advanced study in the humanities faces changes within fields, the university and the wider culture. Considers the debate over the status of the humanities with regard to historical genealogies and current innovations. Particular attention on changes in doctoral education. Topics include: origins of the research university; disciplines and specialization; liberal education in conflict with professionalization; literature and literacy education; interdisciplinarity as a challenge to departments; education policy; digital humanities; accountability in education, assessment and student-centered pedagogies.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

GERMAN 251: Youth Culture

Beginning after World War I, the seminar discusses youth as a special phase in life course in the context of political, social and cultural change. Which tasks and problems did society, schools, and parents submit to youth, and how did that change throughout the history of the twentieth century? Youth cultures of different social classes in Germany, and German youth literature will be analyzed. In the seminar, it will also be discussed if youth and youth culture became of more importance for the growing ups throughout the twentieth century. It will be analyzed, if the generational conflicts in society and families have increased in the twentieth century. The impact of political regimes, economy and media on youth and youth cultures will be discussed, too. The seminar starts with the Bündische Jugend in the Weimar Republic, continues with the Hitler-Jugend in Nazi-Germany and the Halbstarke in the 1950ies and goes to the movement of 1968 at the German universities.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 1-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

GERMAN 255: Speaking Medieval: Germanic Vernaculars and their Remains (ENGLISH 255)

This class presents a survey of medieval German vernaculars and their documentation in manuscripts and on material objects. The languages include Gothic, Old Norse, Old Frisian, Old Saxon, Old English, and Old High German. Readings will include runic inscriptions, magic charms, proverbs and riddles, apocalyptic visions, heroic lays, and sermons and prayers. (This course must be taken for a letter grade and a minimum of 3 units to satisfy a Ways requirement.)nPlease note this course meets MW 1:30-2:50 and is taught by Professors Kathryn Starkey and Elaine Treharne.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

GERMAN 258: Song Collections as a Reflection of Social and Political Practices at the Hapsburg Court ca. 1500

Artistic endeavors were of crucial importance for Emperor Maximilian¿s self-conception and his notion of an emerging German nation. Up to now it has been investigated particularly by looking at literary and visual artworks commissioned by him. In the seminar musical products of the Imperial court, especially songs will be surveyed as expressions of courtiers, urban patricians and humanists in the German lands. A manuscript collection, which was prepared for the Diet in Augsburg 1518 will be at the core of the course, complemented by an early print from 1512. Besides a panegyric on Maximilian as defender of Christendom against the Turks there are standard lyrics, mostly on the theme of love and some merry topics, punctuated by a considerable amount of politically conceived texts, complaining about grievances and social evils at court. Recent approaches have tried to decipher courtly love poems of pre-conversational times as a method of launching social or political opinions in a disguised way. Thus the anthology can be checked as a vehicle of political communication. Philological aspects of source description, material, layout and handwriting will also be examined. Additionally, excursions to Early Modern High German and to musical procedures will be undertaken.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

GERMAN 262: The Total Work of Art

Frequently associated with the work of Richard Wagner, The Total Work of Art (or Gesamtkunstwerk) is a genre that aims to synthesize a range of artistic forms into an organic unity, a unity that both models and helps to forge an ideal state. This seminar will examine the history of the Gesamtkunstwerk from its roots in German Romanticism to the present day, focusing on the genre's relations with technology and mass culture across a wide range of media. Creations we will consider include Wagner's Festival Theatre at Bayreuth, Walter Gropius' plans for a Totaltheater, Bertolt Brecht and Kurt Weill's radio-oratorio The Lindbergh Flight, Leni Riefenstahl's Triumph of the Will, Walt Disney's theme parks, Andy Warhol's Exploding Plastic Inevitable, and Bill Gates' "home of the future." Taught in English.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

GERMAN 262A: Explosions of Enlightenment (COMPLIT 262A)

Eighteenth-century culture seen as permeated by intellectual and artistic practices and plays pushing principles of reason and rationality to an extreme that becomes self-undercutting. Such obsessions and practices are becoming more visible and prominent now, as the traditional concept of "Enlightenment" (synonymous with the 18th century) is undergoing a profound transformation. Among the protagonists of this seminar will be: Diderot as a philosopher and novelist; Lichtenberg as a scientist and writer of everyday notes; Goya, accusing violence and obsessed with nightmarish visions; Mozart as the excessive master of repetition and variation.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

GERMAN 264: Post-Cold War German Foreign Policy

This course is devoted to Germany's role and policy in international relations since 1990. It is based on the premise that Germany's post-Cold War foreign policy was shaped by two potentially conflicting impulses which is historical learning versus the country's economic role and geopolitical position. The course's objective is to make students familiar with the overall conditions of German Foreign Policy in the post-Cold War era and to analyze related tensions and dilemmas. Empirical examples are Germany's role in the Yugoslavian wars in the first half of the 1990s, the transatlantic crisis over the Iraq war of 2003 and Germany's engagement in Afghanistan and German Foreign Policy during the country's tenure as a non-permanent member of the UN Security Council 2011-2012. Discussion in English; German reading knowledge required.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

GERMAN 264A: Walter Benjamin (COMPLIT 264)

Walter Benjamin's work as cultural historian, critic, literary author and philosopher, seen from the trajectory of a German-Jewish intellectual life in the context of the first half of the 20th century. Providing such a historical perspective will be the condition for an actively critical reading of Benjamin's works; a reading that -- counter to the predominant Benjamin-reception -- will try to distinguish between works of purely biographical and historical interest and those Benjamin texts that prove to be of great and lasting intellectual value. Taught in English.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

GERMAN 266: Media Constellations 1200-1900

Media history in its traditional sense poses at least two problems: it presupposes the media whose histories are to be written, and it writes these histories along (more or less telelogically constructed) series of innovations. If the focus is less on the media as such but on the media processes and forms in their historical dynamics and pluralities, one is encouraged to look for other historiographic models: models taking into account the local as well as the global, the mikro as well as the makro level of history. This is where significant constellations, i. e. temporal and spatial condensations of cultural elements, start to play a major role. And this is where literary texts become relevant as forms specifically able to include other forms, to reflect communicative strategies, and to develop concise scenes which not only display what media are, but also what they could be. This is precisely what the seminar likes to study: literary forms produced before the era of media discourses, i. e. basically between ca 1200 and 1900, forms that, each by its own means, give us ideas of how a history of the imagination of media could look like. Texts are provided in the original form (mostly German), as well as in English translations.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 1-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

GERMAN 282: Martin Heidegger (COMPLIT 213A, COMPLIT 313A, GERMAN 382)

Working through the most systematically important texts by Martin Heidegger and their historical moments and challenges, starting with Being and Time (1927), but emphasizing his philosophical production after World War II. The philological and historical understanding of the texts function as a condition for the laying open of their systematic provocations within our own (early 21st-century) situations. Satisfies the capstone seminar requirement for the major tracks in Philosophy and Literature. Taught in English.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

GERMAN 283: Brecht

Arguably the most influential theatrical artist of the twentieth century, Bertolt Brecht continues to be a lightning rod for debates over art and politics. This course will consider Brecht as playwright, director, and theorist. Alongside reading and discussing texts such as Threepenny Opera, Mother Courage, and Galileo, students will also be expected to participate in occasional in-class performances in order better to grapple with his plays and theories. No previous theatrical experience is necessary.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

GERMAN 285: Environmentalism, Literature and Cultural Criticism

Concern for environmental threats increasingly draw on traditions of cultural and civilizational criticism. This course explores literary and cultural dimensions of environmentalist discourse, especially in German-speaking Europe but with opportunities for comparative treatments of ecological tendencies in other countries. Topics include: Environmentalism as progressive or as conservative; ambivalence toward technology; sustainability and the critique of growth; humans and animals. Authors such as F. Jünger, Jahnn, Wolf, C. Amery, Dath, with comparisons to Leopold, Atwood, Ghosh, Latouche and others. Reading knowledge of German or permission of instructor.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

GERMAN 289: Buechner and Wedekind (TAPS 289)

Modern theatre owes an incalculable debt to two German playwrights: Georg Büchner (1813-1837) and Frank Wedekind (1864-1918). We will read their still-shocking portraits of sex, madness, and social brutality in plays such as Woyzeck and Spring's Awakening, and explore the international journeys these works have made from stage to film and from opera to musical theatre.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

GERMAN 298: Writing Workshop

Open only to German majors and to students working on special projects, including written reports for internships. Honors students use this number for the honors essay. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 1-12 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

GERMAN 310A: Music and Critical Theory (MUSIC 310A)

The seminar provides an opportunity to study some of the seminal texts of Critical Theory dealing with music. Concentrating on Theodor Adorno's writings on music, we will also include key philosophers who informed Adorno's thinking (in particular Kant, Hegel and Nietzsche), influential nineteenth-century aesthetics of music (Hoffmann, Schopenhauer and Hanslick), other contemporaries of Adorno (for example, Ernst Bloch), and some later authors whose work was influenced by the Frankfurt School (such as Carl Dahlhaus). We will also consider the impact of Critical Theory on recent scholarship. Weekly meetings will be organized around various topics, ranging from central concepts such as "Enlightenment" and "musical material" to individual composers. Music by Wagner, Mahler, Schoenberg, Stravinsky and Weill will feature prominently on the syllabus.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

GERMAN 319: Modern Theatre (GERMAN 119, TAPS 119, TAPS 319)

Modern theatre in Europe and the US, with a focus on the most influential works from roughly 1880 to the present. What were the conventions of theatrical practice that modern theatre displaced? What were the principal innovations of modern playwriting, acting, stage design, and theatrical architecture? How did modern theatrical artists wrestle with the revolutionary transformations of the modern age? Plays by Büchner, Ibsen, Strindberg, Shaw, Chekhov, Wilde, Wedekind, Treadwell, Pirandello, Brecht, O¿Neill, Beckett, Smith, Parks, and Nottage.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Smith, M. (PI)

GERMAN 320: German Literature 1: How Stories are Told (ca. 1170-1600) (GERMAN 220)

This seminar offers a survey of medieval and early modern German literature and culture from ca.800 to 1600. This year we will focus primarily on heroic epic and tales of fortune. Most texts are available only in German. Advanced reading knowledge of German required. Discussion in English.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 1-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

GERMAN 321: German Literature 2: Selfhood and History (COMPLIT 321A, GERMAN 221)

How the literature of the period between 1750 and 1900 gives voice to new conceptions of selfhood and articulates the emergent self understanding of modernity. Responses to unprecedented historical experiences such as the French Revolution and the ensuing wars, changes in the understanding of nature, the crisis of foundations, and the persistence of theological motifs. Lessing, Herder, Goethe, Schiller, Holderlin, Kleist, Heine, Buchner, Keller, and Fontane. Taught in English, readings in German. (Note: Fulfills DLCL 325 for AY 1415 for the PhD Minor in the Humanities)
Terms: not given this year | Units: 1-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

GERMAN 322: German Literature 3: Myth and Modernity (COMPLIT 222A, GERMAN 222)

Masters of German 20th- and 21st-Century literature and philosophy as they present aesthetic innovation and confront the challenges of modern technology, social alienation, manmade catastrophes, and imagine the future. Readings include Nietzsche, Freud, Rilke, Musil, Brecht, Kafka, Doeblin, Benjamin, Juenger, Arendt, Musil, Mann, Adorno, Celan, Grass, Bachmann, Bernhardt, Wolf, and Kluge. Taught in English. Undergraduates enroll in 222 for 5 units, graduate students enroll in 322 for 8 units.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 1-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

GERMAN 328: Writing with Kafka (GERMAN 128)

This course explores Franz Kafka his literary work and biography, its themes and his contemporary significance through an array of heterogeneous materials and creative practices. Discussions of Kafka's short writings, correspondences and diary entries; feuilletons about Kafka, film and radio adaptations of his works. Exploring ways to make Krafka's creativity productive for their writing, students may study topics such as questions of textual criticism, humor, parody, the uncanny and the Kafkaesque in Kafka and today. Throughout, the seminar will tease out historical and cultural backgrounds of Kafka's work and life, and trace the crisis of modernity in his writings. Readings, discussions and writing creative projects and analytical writing in German.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Knuepling, F. (PI)

GERMAN 330: Medieval and Early Modern German Literature (GERMAN 230)

This seminar offers a survey of medieval and early modern German literature and culture from ca.800 to 1600. This year we will focus primarily on heroic epic and tales of fortune. Most texts are available only in German. Advanced reading knowledge of German required. Discussion in English.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Starkey, K. (PI)

GERMAN 331: German Literature (1700-1900) (GERMAN 231)

How the literature of the period between 1750 and 1900 gives voice to new conceptions of selfhood and articulates the emergent self understanding of modernity. Responses to unprecedented historical experiences such as the French Revolution and the ensuing wars, changes in the understanding of nature, the crisis of foundations, and the persistence of theological motifs. Lessing, Herder, Goethe, Schiller, Holderlin, Kleist, Heine, Buchner, Keller, and Fontane. Taught in English, readings in German.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Berman, R. (PI)

GERMAN 332: German Literature 3: Modernity and the Unspeakable (GERMAN 232)

Masterpieces of German literature, drama, and film from the first half of the 20th century. Particular focus on modernism and the crisis of language. What urgent truths (whether psychological, political, spiritual, or sexual) cannot be expressed, and how do art and dreams attempt to speak the unspeakable? Readings and viewings include works by Hofmannsthal, Schnitzler, Freud, Wedekind, Mann, Musil, Kafka, Toller, Höch, Rilke, Schoenberg, Riefensthal, Benjamin, and Brecht. Taught in English.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Smith, M. (PI)

GERMAN 336: Refugees, Politics and Culture in Contemporary Germany (GERMAN 136)

Responses to refugees and immigration to Germany against the backdrop of German history and in the context of domestic and European politics. Topics include: cultural difference and integration processes, gender roles, religious traditions, populism and neo-nationalism. Reading knowledge of German, another European language, or an immigrant language will be useful for research projects, but not required.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Berman, R. (PI)

GERMAN 344: Religious and Gender Identity in Postmigrant Theatre (GERMAN 244)

This course will center around three recent theatre plays associated under the auspices of what has been called Germany's postmigrant theatre: Günther Senkel and Feridun Zaimo¿lu's Black Virgins (Schwarze Jungfrauen), Nurkan Erpulat and Jens Hillje's Crazy Blood (Verrücktes Blut), and Sasha Marianna Salzmann's Mothertongue (Muttersprache Mameloschn). Postmigrant theatre has been ushered in as a theatre movement that has successfully established and institutionalized new aesthetics, narratives, and political tools for artists of color and of different linguistic backgrounds in Germany. As a space where diversity is both explored and affirmed, postmigrant theatre and the abovementioned plays in particular attend to the intersections and tensions of religion and gender. Engaging contemporary political and social debates about representations of gender and Islam and queer identity and Judaism in the West, we will examine how theatre and performance forge new spaces of encounter, community, and even identity. Together with these plays, we will read texts from theatre and performance theories, women of color feminisms, gender performativity, homonormativity, and queer and trans of color critique. This course is designed as an introduction to postmigrant theatre and its theatrical intervention in contemporary thinking on gender and religion.nNOTE: This course must be taken for a letter grade and a minimum of 3 units to be eligible for Ways credit.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Landry, O. (PI)

GERMAN 351: Social Market Economy: Facing Globalization and Digitization (GERMAN 151, PUBLPOL 161, PUBLPOL 261)

Examines the German political economic model in the face of current challenges. Topics include the legacy of Ordoliberalism, management of systemic risks, regulatory frameworks for a digital economy, new competition policies and the right to be forgotten on the internet. Required readings in English, optional supplementary readings in German.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

GERMAN 354: Poetic Thinking Across Media (COMPLIT 154B, COMPLIT 354B, GERMAN 154, JEWISHST 144B)

Even before Novalis claimed that the world must be romanticized, thinkers, writers, and artists wanted to perceive the human and natural world poetically. The pre- and post-romantic poetic modes of thinking they created are the subject of this course. Readings include Ecclestias, Zhaozhou Congshen, Montaigne, Nietzsche, Kafka, Benjamin, Arendt, and Sontag. This course will also present poetic thinking in the visual arts--from the expressionism of Ingmar Bergman to the neo-romanticism of Gerhard Richter.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

GERMAN 369: Introduction to the Profession of "Literary Studies" for Graduate Students (COMPLIT 369, DLCL 369, FRENCH 369, ITALIAN 369)

A history of literary theory for entering graduate students in national literature departments and comparative literature.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-2 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Greene, R. (PI)

GERMAN 382: Martin Heidegger (COMPLIT 213A, COMPLIT 313A, GERMAN 282)

Working through the most systematically important texts by Martin Heidegger and their historical moments and challenges, starting with Being and Time (1927), but emphasizing his philosophical production after World War II. The philological and historical understanding of the texts function as a condition for the laying open of their systematic provocations within our own (early 21st-century) situations. Satisfies the capstone seminar requirement for the major tracks in Philosophy and Literature. Taught in English.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

GERMAN 384: The Nervous Age: Neurosis, Neurology, and Nineteenth-century Theatre

The nineteenth century witnessed profound developments in neurological and psychological sciences, developments that fundamentally altered conceptions of embodiment, agency, and mind. This course will place these scientific shifts in conversation with theatrical transformations of the period. We will read nineteenth-century neuropsychologists such as Charles Bell, Johannes Müller, George Miller Beard, Jean-Martin Charcot, and Hippolyte Bernheim alongside artists such as Percy Shelley, Georg Büchner, Richard Wagner, Émile Zola, and August Strindberg. NOTE: Only for German Studies PhD students.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 1-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

GERMAN 390: German Capstone: Reading Franz Kafka (COMPLIT 111, COMPLIT 311C, GERMAN 190, JEWISHST 147, JEWISHST 349)

This class will address major works by Franz Kafka and consider Kafka as a modernist writer whose work reflects on modernity. We will also examine the role of Kafka's themes and poetics in the work of contemporary writers. (Meets Writing-in-the-Major requirement)
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

GERMAN 397: Graduate Studies Colloquium

Colloquium for graduate students in German Studies. Taught in English. May be repeat for credit
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Berman, R. (PI)

GERMAN 399: Individual Work

Repeatable for Credit. Instructor Consent Required.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-12 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

GERMAN 802: TGR Dissertation

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 0 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: TGR
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