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SOC 1: Introduction to Sociology at Stanford

This course to get students to think like a sociologist; to use core concepts and theories from the field of sociology to make sense of the most pressing issues of our time: race and ethnicity; gender and sexuality; family; education; social class and economic inequality; social connectedness; social movements; and immigration. The course will draw heavily on the research and writing of Stanford¿s own sociologist.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Jimenez, T. (PI)

SOC 14N: Inequality in American Society

An overview of the major forms of inequality in American society, their causes and consequences. Special attention will devoted to to public policy associated with inequality.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Snipp, C. (PI)

SOC 45Q: Understanding Race and Ethnicity in American Society (CSRE 45Q)

Preference to sophomores. Historical overview of race in America, race and violence, race and socioeconomic well-being, and the future of race relations in America. Enrollment limited to 16.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Snipp, C. (PI)

SOC 114: Economic Sociology (SOC 214)

(Graduate students register for 214.) The sociological approach to production, distribution, consumption, and markets, emphasizing the impact of norms, power, social structure, and institutions on the economy. Comparison of classic and contemporary approaches to the economy among the social science disciplines. Topics: consumption, labor markets, organization of professions such as law and medicine, the economic role of informal networks, industrial organization, including the structure and history of the computer and popular music industries, business alliances, capitalism in non-Western societies, and the transition from state socialism in E. Europe and China.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Granovetter, M. (PI)

SOC 137: Global Inequality

Absolute world poverty has declined considerably in the last twenty years, but elites have gained disproportionately from the growth of the global economy, leading to serious concerns about inequality in several countries, as well as in global policy circles. This discussion-based seminar explores how global capitalism affects worldwide inequality. Topics include the evolution, causes, and structure of global inequality, the links between inequality and human development, and potential solutions to global inequality.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Young, P. (PI)

SOC 156A: The Changing American City (CSRE 156, SOC 256A, URBANST 156A)

After decades of decline, U.S. cities today are undergoing major transformations. Young professionals, Millenials, and members of the creative class are flocking to cities. Massive waves of immigration have transformed the racial and ethnic compositions of cities and their neighborhoods. Public housing projects that once defined the inner city are disappearing, and the recent housing boom and bust shook up the urban landscape. This class will include readings and discussion on contemporary developments in U.S. cities and how they relate to race, ethnicity, and class. Topics include immigration, gentrification, crime, public housing, and the housing crisis.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Hwang, J. (PI)

SOC 179N: The Science of Diverse Communities (CSRE 30N, EDUC 30N, PSYCH 30N)

This course is an exploration. Most generally, its aim is to identify distinguishing features of good diverse communities and articulate them well enough to offer principles or guidelines for how to design and manage such communities¿all with a particular focus on educational communities like schools, universities, academic disciplines, etc., but with the hope that such principles might generalize to other kinds of organizations and the broader society. The readings range from those on the origins of human communities and social identities to those on intergroup trust building. They also aim to embed our discussions in the major ¿diversity¿ issues of the day¿for example, what¿s in the news about campus life. nnThus the course has a practical purpose: to develop testable ideas for improving the comfort level, fairness and goodness-for-all of ¿identity¿ diverse communities--especially in educational settings. nnThe course also has a basic science purpose: to explore the psychological significance of community. Is there a psychological need for community? Is there something about a need for community that can¿t be reduced to other needs¿for example, for a gender, racial or sexual-orientation identity? How strong is the need for community¿against other needs? What kinds of human grouping¿s can satisfy it? In meeting this need, can membership in one community substitute for membership in others? What do people need from communities in order to thrive in them? Do strong diverse communities dampen intergroup biases? Can strong community loyalty mitigate identity tensions within communities? And so on. nnSuch questions, the hope is, will help us develop a more systematic understanding of the challenges and opportunities inherent in diverse human communities
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Steele, C. (PI)

SOC 186: Introduction to Disability Studies and Disability Rights (ETHICSOC 104X, FEMGEN 94H, HUMRTS 104)

Disability Studies is a relatively new interdisciplinary academic field that examines disability as a social, cultural and political phenomenon. This is an introductory course to the field of disability studies and it aims to investigate the complex concept of disability through a variety of prisms and disciplines including social psychology, the humanities, legal studies and media studies. This course also focuses on the multiple connections between the study of disability and other identities including class, race, ethnicity, gender and sexual orientation, and also includes a comparative look at how disability is treated across cultures. Some of the topics covered in the class are disability and the family, the history of the disability rights movement, the development of disability identity and its intersectionality, antidiscrimination law, the UN Convention on the Rights of People with Disabilities, bioethical dilemmas pertaining to disability and more.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Dorfman, D. (PI)

SOC 193: Undergraduate Teaching Apprenticeship

Prior arrangement required.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

SOC 194: Computational Undergraduate Research Assistantship

Computational sociology research assistant working with faculty on an on-going technical research project. Applications for position reviewed on a rolling basis.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Willer, R. (PI)

SOC 204: Junior/Senior Seminar for Majors

Conclusion of capstone sequence. Students write a substantial paper based on the research project developed in 202. Students in the honors program may incorporate paper into their thesis. Guest scholar chosen by students. Sociology majors who are seniors may take Soc 204 as their sole Writing In the Major class, as a substitute for Soc 200, with no prerequisites required.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Hwang, J. (PI)

SOC 214: Economic Sociology (SOC 114)

(Graduate students register for 214.) The sociological approach to production, distribution, consumption, and markets, emphasizing the impact of norms, power, social structure, and institutions on the economy. Comparison of classic and contemporary approaches to the economy among the social science disciplines. Topics: consumption, labor markets, organization of professions such as law and medicine, the economic role of informal networks, industrial organization, including the structure and history of the computer and popular music industries, business alliances, capitalism in non-Western societies, and the transition from state socialism in E. Europe and China.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Granovetter, M. (PI)

SOC 256A: The Changing American City (CSRE 156, SOC 156A, URBANST 156A)

After decades of decline, U.S. cities today are undergoing major transformations. Young professionals, Millenials, and members of the creative class are flocking to cities. Massive waves of immigration have transformed the racial and ethnic compositions of cities and their neighborhoods. Public housing projects that once defined the inner city are disappearing, and the recent housing boom and bust shook up the urban landscape. This class will include readings and discussion on contemporary developments in U.S. cities and how they relate to race, ethnicity, and class. Topics include immigration, gentrification, crime, public housing, and the housing crisis.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Hwang, J. (PI)

SOC 278: Introduction to Computational Social Science (MS&E 231)

With a vast amount of data now collected on our online and offline actions -- from what we buy, to where we travel, to who we interact with -- we have an unprecedented opportunity to study complex social systems. This opportunity, however, comes with scientific, engineering, and ethical challenges. In this hands-on course, we develop ideas from computer science and statistics to address problems in sociology, economics, political science, and beyond. We cover techniques for collecting and parsing data, methods for large-scale machine learning, and principles for effectively communicating results. To see how these techniques are applied in practice, we discuss recent research findings in a variety of areas. Prerequisites: introductory course in applied statistics, and experience coding in R, Python, or another high-level language.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

SOC 305: Graduate Proseminar

For first-year Sociology doctoral students only, Introduction and orientation to the field of Sociology. May be repeat for credit
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Jimenez, T. (PI)

SOC 311A: Workshop: Comparative Studies of Educational and Political Systems (EDUC 387)

Analysis of quantitative and longitudinal data on national educational systems and political structures. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

SOC 314: Economic Sociology

Classical and contemporary literature covering the sociological approach to markets and the economy, and comparing it to other disciplines. Topics: consumption, labor, professions, industrial organization, and the varieties of capitalism; historical and comparative perspectives on market and non-market provision of goods and services, and on transitions among economic systems. The relative impact of culture, institutions, norms, social networks, technology, and material conditions. Prerequisite: doctoral student status or consent of instructor. Please note: Lecture and discussion section are both required
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Granovetter, M. (PI)

SOC 315W: Workshop: Economic Sociology and Organizations

Theory, methods, and research in the sociology of the economy and of formal organizations, through presentations of ongoing work by students, faculty, and guest speakers, and discussion of recent literature and controversies. May be repeated for credit. Restricted to Sociology doctoral students; others by consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

SOC 321W: Workshop: Social Psychology and Gender

Advanced graduate student workshop in social psychology. Current theories and research agendas, recent publications, and presentations of ongoing research by faculty and students. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

SOC 325W: Workshop: Graduate Family

Sociology PhD students will present their own work weekly, and read and critique the research-in-progress of their peers on issues of family, household structure, interpersonal relationships, marriage, demography, survey data, demographic methods, statistical methods, and related fields. May be repeat for credit starting 8/1/2016.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Rosenfeld, M. (PI)

SOC 339: Gender Meanings and Processes

Current theories and research on the social processes, such as socialization, status processes, stereotyping, and cognition, that produce gender difference and inequality. Intersections of gender with race, class, and bodies. Applications to workplaces, schools, families, and intimate relationships. Prerequisite: Sociology doctoral student or consent of instructor
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Correll, S. (PI)

SOC 341W: Workshop: Inequality

Causes, consequences, and structure of inequality; how inequality results from and shapes social classes, occupations, professions, and other aspects of the economy. Research presentations by students, faculty, and guest speakers. Discussion of controversies, theories, and recent writings. May be repeated for credit. Restricted to Sociology doctoral students; others by consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

SOC 348: Advanced Topics in the Sociology of Gender

Seminar for graduate students who have research projects in progress that focus on questions about gender and society. Research projects can be at any stage from the initial development to the final writing up of results. Focus is on questions posed by the research projects of the seminar participants. Readings include relevant background to each other's questions and present their own work in progress. A final paper reports the progress on the seminar member's research project. May be repeat for credit
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Ridgeway, C. (PI)

SOC 350W: Workshop: Migration, Ethnicity, Race and Nation

Current theories and research, recent publications, and presentations of ongoing research by faculty and students. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Sociology doctoral student or consent of instructor
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

SOC 361W: Workshop: Networks and Organizations (EDUC 361)

For students doing advanced research. Group comments and criticism on dissertation projects at any phase of completion, including data problems, empirical and theoretical challenges, presentation refinement, and job market presentations. Collaboration, debate, and shaping research ideas. Prerequisite: courses in organizational theory or social network analysis.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Powell, W. (PI)

SOC 362: Organization and Environment

This seminar considers the leading sociological approaches to analyzing relations of organizations and environments, with a special emphasis on dynamics. Attention is given to theoretical formulations, research designs, and results of empirical studies. Prerequisite: Enrollment in a PhD program.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

SOC 363A: Seminar on Organizational Theory (EDUC 375A, MS&E 389)

The social science literature on organizations assessed through consideration of the major theoretical traditions and lines of research predominant in the field.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Powell, W. (PI)

SOC 368W: Workshop: China Social Science (POLISCI 448R)

For Ph.D. students in the social sciences and history. Research on contemporary society and politics in the People's Republic of China. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

SOC 370B: Social Interaction and Group Process

Theoretical strategies for the study of interaction, group, and network processes, including rational choice and exchange theory, the theory of action, symbolic interactionism, formal sociology, and social phenomenology. Antecedent ideas in foundational works and contemporary programs of theoretical research.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

SOC 374: Philanthropy and Civil Society (EDUC 374, POLISCI 334)

Cross-listed with Law (LAW 781), Political Science (POLISCI 334) and Sociology (SOC 374). Associated with the Center for Philanthropy and Civil Society (PACS). Year-long workshop for doctoral students and advanced undergraduates writing senior theses on the nature of civil society or philanthropy. Focus is on pursuit of progressive research and writing contributing to the current scholarly knowledge of the nonprofit sector and philanthropy. Accomplished in a large part through peer review. Readings include recent scholarship in aforementioned fields. May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 9 units.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

SOC 381: Sociological Methodology I: Introduction

Enrollment limited to first-year Sociology doctoral students. Other students by instructor permission only. Basic math and statistics. Types of variables, how to recode and transform variables, and how to manage different types of data sets. How to use and think about weights. Introduction to statistical packages and programming. Introduction to multiple regression, and introduction to the interpretation of regression results. *Students enrolling in Soc381 are strongly encouraged to take a 1-week Math/Statistics refresher course from September 15th to September 22nd. Please contact the instructor at torche@stanford.edu for details. *In addition to the lecture time, SOC381 includes a Discussion Section on Fridays 9:30am - 11:20am.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Torche, F. (PI)

SOC 385A: Research Practicum 1

Workshop on research methods and writing research papers for second year Sociology doctoral students. Ongoing student research, methodological problems, writing challenges, and possible solutions. Required for second year paper.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Saperstein, A. (PI)

SOC 393: Teaching Apprenticeship

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-15 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

SOC 396: Sociology Colloquium

The Sociology Colloquium is a semimonthly seminar held throughout the academic year, in which distinguished scholars lecture about their cutting-edge research findings. Sociology Students must enroll or credit and it is required for all first and second year Sociology students. May be repeat for credit start 8/1/2016
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
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