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ARTHIST 36: DANGEROUS IDEAS (EALC 36, ENGLISH 71, HISTORY 3D, MUSIC 36H, PHIL 36)

Ideas matter. Concepts such as equality, progress, and tradition have inspired social movements, shaped political systems, and dramatically influenced the lives of individuals. Others, like freedom of the press, fact versus fiction, and citizenship play an important role in contemporary debates in the United States. All of these ideas are contested, and they have a real power to change lives, for better and for worse. In this one-unit class we will examine these dangerous ideas. Each week, a faculty member from a different department in the humanities and arts will explore a concept that has shaped human experience across time and space. Some weeks will have short reading assignments, but you are not required to purchase any materials.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Satz, D. (PI)

ARTHIST 100N: The Artist in Ancient Greek Society (CLASSICS 18N)

Given the importance of art to all aspects of their lives, the Greeks had reason to respect their artists. Yet potters, painters and even sculptors possessed little social standing. n nWhy did the Greeks value the work of craftsmen but not the men themselves? Why did Herodotus dismiss those who worked with their hands as "mechanics?" What prompted Homer to claim that "there is no greater glory for a man¿ than what he achieves with his own hands," provided that he was throwing a discus and not a vase on a wheel?n nPainted pottery was essential to the religious and secular lives of the Greeks. Libations to the gods and to the dead required vases from which to pour them. Economic prosperity depended on the export of wine and oil in durable clay containers. At home, depictions of gods and heroes on vases reinforced Greek values and helped parents to educate their children. Ceramic sets with scenes of Dionysian excess were reserved for elite symposia from which those who potted and painted them were excluded.n nSculptors were less lowly but even those who carved the Parthenon were still regarded as "mechanics," with soft bodies and soft minds (Xenophon) "indifferent to higher things" (Plutarch).n nThe seminar addresses these issues. Students will read and discuss texts, write response papers and present slide lectures and gallery talks on aspects of the artist's profession.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Maxmin, J. (PI)

ARTHIST 143A: American Architecture (AMSTUD 143A, ARTHIST 343A, CEE 32R)

A historically based understanding of what defines American architecture. What makes American architecture American, beginning with indigenous structures of pre-Columbian America. Materials, structure, and form in the changing American context. How these ideas are being transformed in today's globalized world.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Beischer, T. (PI)

ARTHIST 147: Modernism and Modernity (ARTHIST 347)

The development of modern art and visual culture in Europe and the US, beginning with Paris in the 1860s, the period of Haussmann, Baudelaire and Manet, and ending with the Bauhaus and Surrealism in the 1920s and 30s. Modernism in art, architecture and design (e.g., Gauguin, Picasso, Duchamp, Mondrian, Le Corbusier, Breuer, Dali) will be explored as a compelling dream of utopian possibilities involving multifaceted and often ambivalent, even contradictory responses to the changes brought about by industrialization, urbanization, and the rise of mass culture.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Troy, N. (PI)

ARTHIST 151: Migration and Diaspora in American Art, 1800-Present (AMSTUD 151, ARTHIST 351)

This lecture course explores American art through the lens of immigration, exile, and diaspora. We will examine a wide range of work by immigrant artists and craftsmen, paying special attention to issues of race and ethnicity, assimilation, displacement, and political turmoil. Artists considered include Emmanuel Leutze, Thomas Cole, Joseph Stella, Chiura Obata, Willem de Kooning, Jimme Durham, Mona Hatoum, and Julie Mehretu, among many others. How do works of art reflect ¿ and help shape ¿ cultural and individual imaginaries of home and belonging?
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Kwon, M. (PI)

ARTHIST 152: The American West (AMSTUD 124A, ENGLISH 124, HISTORY 151, POLISCI 124A)

The American West is characterized by frontier mythology, vast distances, marked aridity, and unique political and economic characteristics. This course integrates several disciplinary perspectives into a comprehensive examination of Western North America: its history, physical geography, climate, literature, art, film, institutions, politics, demography, economy, and continuing policy challenges. Students examine themes fundamental to understanding the region: time, space, water, peoples, and boom and bust cycles.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ARTHIST 160: Intro to Contemporary Art

Introduction to major themes, figures, movements and ideas in contemporary art, beginning with the question of art and politics in the 1960s. Topics: Postmodernism and the rise of consumer and spectacle culture; the "death" of painting, the impact of technology, cybernetics and the rise of new media; art at the end of the Cold War; globalization and the new global art world. An intro art history course is recommended.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Lee, P. (PI)

ARTHIST 206C: Nostos: The Survival of Antiquity in Medieval Art (ARTHIST 406C)

This seminar explores the processes of survival and activation of Greco-Roman art in the Middle Ages, including iconographic transformations, modalities of reuse, trajectories of return (nostos), and the poetics of embodiment. Focusing on specific case studies from Italy, Spain, France, and England, this course offers in-depth analyses of some of the most remarkable artworks of the Middle Ages in different media, paying special attention to sculpture. Reading assignments will give students the background to engage critically with the thought of scholars such as A. Warburg, E. Panofsky, S. Freud, W. Benjamin, G. Agamben, M. Schapiro, P. Nora, L. Steinberg, and others, with the aim of gaining a rich theoretical perspective on Nachleben der Antike (Afterlife of Antiquity) ¿ one of the central themes in the history of art from Vasari to the most recent Warburgian revival.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ARTHIST 207B: Art and Ritual in Italy 1250-1450 (ARTHIST 407B)

TBA
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Derbes, A. (PI)

ARTHIST 211: The California Missions: Art History and Reconciliation (CSRE 111, NATIVEAM 211)

Sites of the spirit and devotion, sites of genocide, foreboding actors in Alfred Hitchcock's Vertigo, the subject of fourth-grade school projects, the Spanish Missions of Alta California are complex sites of inquiry, their meanings and associations different for each visitor. This seminar examines the art and architecture of the California Missions built between 1769 and 1823. Constructed with local materials and decorated with reredos, paintings and sculptures from Mexico and Spain, the Missions are at once humble spaces and flagships of a belated global baroque. They were also the laboratories of indigenous artists and artisans. This course seeks to understand how Mission art was meant to function, how and why it was made, what its materials were, while asking what the larger role of art was in a global system of missions. Can the study of this art lead to the reconciliation of populations in North America and within the field of art history? The Missions require a specific reexamination of the relationship between European and colonial forms, not as objects of curiosity or diffusion but as viable and globally informed agents.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Kinew, S. (PI)

ARTHIST 243B: Photography and Time

This course examines the relationship between photography and temporality from the nineteenth century until the present day. We will study how the new medium interacted with other nineteenth-century technologies to produce a mechanized and standardized time, as well as attempts to use photography to destabilize such objective temporalities. In the twentieth century, we consider the dominant theorization of photography as an art that addresses time, history, and memory through study of critical texts by Benjamin, Barthes, and Bazin, among others. The course concludes by interrogating the applicability of these analogue theories to contemporary photographic practices. Attention to the technical labor of making photographs and the materiality of photographs in the archive will be central to the course, enabled by visits to the Cantor and Special Collections.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Beil, K. (PI)

ARTHIST 268: Encountering Contemporary Chinese Painting: Media and Themes (ARTHIST 468)

Two spring quarter exhibitions -- oil paintings and drawings by Zeng Fanzhi at the Anderson Collection, and Ink Worlds with works by two dozen major ink painters, calligraphers and video essayists at the Cantor -- convey part of the diversity of contemporary Chinese art practice. This seminar will explore media and techniques, artistic careers and strategies, and questions of cultural identity, history, place, language and the visionary presented by these artists and exhibitions.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Vinograd, R. (PI)

ARTHIST 284B: Museum Cultures: Material Representation in the Past and Present (AMSTUD 134, ARCHLGY 134, ARCHLGY 234, CSRE 134, EDUC 214, NATIVEAM 134)

Students will open the "black box" of museums to consider the past and present roles of institutional collections, culminating in a student-curated exhibition. Today, museums assert their relevance as dynamic spaces for debate and learning. Colonialism and restitution, the politics of representation, human/object relationships, and changing frameworks of authority make museum work widely significant and consistently challenging. Through thinking-in-practice, this course reflexively explores "museum cultures": representations of self and other within museums and institutional cultures of the museum world itself.n3 credits (no final project) or 5 credits (final project). May be repeat for credit
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Hodge, C. (PI)

ARTHIST 287A: The Japanese Tea Ceremony: The History, Aesthetics, and Politics Behind a National Pastime (JAPAN 288)

The Japanese tea ceremony, the ultimate premodern multimedia phenomenon, integrates architecture, garden design, ceramics, painting, calligraphy, and other treasured objects into a choreographed ritual wherein host, objects, and guests perform designated roles on a tiny stage sometimes only six feet square.. In addition to its much-touted aesthetic and philosophical aspects, the practice of tea includes inevitable political and rhetorical dimensions. This course traces the evolution of tea practice from its inception within the milieu of courtier diversions, Zen monasteries, and warrior villas, through its various permutations into the 20th century, where it was manipulated by the emerging industrialist class for different-but ultimately similar-ends.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Harrison, L. (PI)

ARTHIST 295: Visual Arts Internship

Professional experience in a field related to the Visual Arts for six to ten weeks. Internships may include work for galleries, museums, art centers, and art publications. Students arrange the internship, provide a confirmation letter from the hosting institution, and must receive consent from the faculty coordinator to enroll in units. To supplement the internship students maintain a journal and write a research paper related to the experience and their area of academic interest. Evaluations from the student and the supervisor are submitted at the end of the internship. Restricted to declared majors and minors. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

ARTHIST 297: Honors Thesis Writing

May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ARTHIST 298: Individual Work: Art History

Prerequisite: student must have taken a course with the instructor and/or completed relevant introductory course(s). Instructor consent and completion of the Independent Study Form are required prior to enrollment. All necessary forms and payment are required by the end of Week 2 of each quarter. Please contact the Undergraduate Coordinator in McMurtry 108 for more information. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-15 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ARTHIST 343A: American Architecture (AMSTUD 143A, ARTHIST 143A, CEE 32R)

A historically based understanding of what defines American architecture. What makes American architecture American, beginning with indigenous structures of pre-Columbian America. Materials, structure, and form in the changing American context. How these ideas are being transformed in today's globalized world.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Beischer, T. (PI)

ARTHIST 347: Modernism and Modernity (ARTHIST 147)

The development of modern art and visual culture in Europe and the US, beginning with Paris in the 1860s, the period of Haussmann, Baudelaire and Manet, and ending with the Bauhaus and Surrealism in the 1920s and 30s. Modernism in art, architecture and design (e.g., Gauguin, Picasso, Duchamp, Mondrian, Le Corbusier, Breuer, Dali) will be explored as a compelling dream of utopian possibilities involving multifaceted and often ambivalent, even contradictory responses to the changes brought about by industrialization, urbanization, and the rise of mass culture.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Troy, N. (PI)

ARTHIST 351: Migration and Diaspora in American Art, 1800-Present (AMSTUD 151, ARTHIST 151)

This lecture course explores American art through the lens of immigration, exile, and diaspora. We will examine a wide range of work by immigrant artists and craftsmen, paying special attention to issues of race and ethnicity, assimilation, displacement, and political turmoil. Artists considered include Emmanuel Leutze, Thomas Cole, Joseph Stella, Chiura Obata, Willem de Kooning, Jimme Durham, Mona Hatoum, and Julie Mehretu, among many others. How do works of art reflect ¿ and help shape ¿ cultural and individual imaginaries of home and belonging?
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Kwon, M. (PI)

ARTHIST 405A: Graduate Pedagogy Course

This course is designed for graduate students in Art History and Film Studies preparing to work as teaching assistants in the Department of Art and Art History. The seminar will focus on a range of theoretical and practical concerns pertaining to the successful conceptualization, organization, and execution of class lectures and discussion sections. Students will be exposed to a variety of perspectives and strategies related to quality teaching at the college level.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Levi, P. (PI)

ARTHIST 406C: Nostos: The Survival of Antiquity in Medieval Art (ARTHIST 206C)

This seminar explores the processes of survival and activation of Greco-Roman art in the Middle Ages, including iconographic transformations, modalities of reuse, trajectories of return (nostos), and the poetics of embodiment. Focusing on specific case studies from Italy, Spain, France, and England, this course offers in-depth analyses of some of the most remarkable artworks of the Middle Ages in different media, paying special attention to sculpture. Reading assignments will give students the background to engage critically with the thought of scholars such as A. Warburg, E. Panofsky, S. Freud, W. Benjamin, G. Agamben, M. Schapiro, P. Nora, L. Steinberg, and others, with the aim of gaining a rich theoretical perspective on Nachleben der Antike (Afterlife of Antiquity) ¿ one of the central themes in the history of art from Vasari to the most recent Warburgian revival.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ARTHIST 407B: Art and Ritual in Italy 1250-1450 (ARTHIST 207B)

TBA
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Derbes, A. (PI)

ARTHIST 450: Art in the Age of Precarity

Art and precarity in the age of neoliberalism. How artists and critics engage questions of immaterial labor, human capital, structural racism, environmental crisis, the anthropocene and other current issues in their work. The question of art as activism and social practice relative to such themes. Enrollment contingent upon permission of instructor; permission numbers will be provided by staff upon professor's approval.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Lee, P. (PI)

ARTHIST 468: Encountering Contemporary Chinese Painting: Media and Themes (ARTHIST 268)

Two spring quarter exhibitions -- oil paintings and drawings by Zeng Fanzhi at the Anderson Collection, and Ink Worlds with works by two dozen major ink painters, calligraphers and video essayists at the Cantor -- convey part of the diversity of contemporary Chinese art practice. This seminar will explore media and techniques, artistic careers and strategies, and questions of cultural identity, history, place, language and the visionary presented by these artists and exhibitions.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Vinograd, R. (PI)

ARTHIST 479: The Days: On the Writing of Specific Dates in History

What is the value of writing a whole essay or dissertation or book on a specific date in history? What does such an approach reveal and obscure? What challenges does it place on the *writer* of history? Exploring a series of case histories in weekly meetings, the seminar will also ask that each student write a paper on a specific date, evoking that one day on the calendar as a moment of unforgettable importance.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Nemerov, A. (PI)

ARTHIST 610: Teaching Praxis

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

ARTHIST 620: Qualifying Examination Preparation

For Art History Ph.D. candidates. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

ARTHIST 640: Dissertation Proposal Preparation

(Staff)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 5 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

ARTHIST 650: Dissertation Research

(Staff)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

ARTHIST 660: Independent Study

For graduate students only. Approved independent research projects with individual faculty members.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-15 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ARTHIST 660E: Extended Seminar

May be repeated for credit. (Staff)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ARTHIST 680: Curricular Practical Training

CPT course required for international students completing degree. Prerequisite: Art History Ph.D. candidate.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Vinograd, R. (PI)
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