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ESS 8: The Oceans: An Introduction to the Marine Environment (EARTHSYS 8)

The course will provide a basic understanding of how the ocean functions as a suite of interconnected ecosystems, both naturally and under the influence of human activities. Emphasis is on the interactions between the physical and chemical environment and the dominant organisms of each ecosystem. The types of ecosystems discussed include coral reefs, deep-sea hydrothermal vents, coastal upwelling systems, blue-water oceans, estuaries, and near-shore dead zones. Lectures, multimedia presentations, group activities, and tide-pooling day trip.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ESS 46N: Exploring the Critical Interface between the Land and Monterey Bay: Elkhorn Slough (EARTHSYS 46N)

Preference to freshmen. Field trips to sites in the Elkhorn Slough, a small agriculturally impacted estuary that opens into Monterey Bay, a model ecosystem for understanding the complexity of estuaries, and one of California's last remaining coastal wetlands. Readings include Jane Caffrey's Changes in a California Estuary: A Profile of Elkhorn Slough. Basics of biogeochemistry, microbiology, oceanography, ecology, pollution, and environmental management.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Francis, C. (PI)

ESS 106: World Food Economy (EARTHSYS 106, EARTHSYS 206, ECON 106, ECON 206, ESS 206)

The economics of food production, consumption, and trade. The micro- and macro- determinants of food supply and demand, including the interrelationship among food, income, population, and public-sector decision making. Emphasis on the role of agriculture in poverty alleviation, economic development, and environmental outcomes. (graduate students enroll in 206)
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ESS 107: Control of Nature (EARTHSYS 107)

Think controlling the earth's climate is science fiction? It is when you watch Snowpiercer or Dune, but scientists are already devising geoengineering schemes to slow climate change. Will we ever resurrect the woolly mammoth or even a T. Rex (think Jurassic Park)? Based on current research, that day will come in your lifetime. Who gets to decide what species to save? And more generally, what scientific and ethical principles should guide our decisions to control nature? In this course, we will examine the science behind ways that people alter and engineer the earth, critically examining the positive and negative consequences. We'll explore these issues first through popular movies and books and then, more substantively, in scientific research.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ER | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ESS 108: Research Preparation for Undergraduates

For undergraduates planning to conduct research during the summer with faculty through the MUIR and SUPER programs. Readings, oral presentations, proposal development. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Credit/No Credit

ESS 135: Community Leadership

Offered through Residential Education to residents of Castano House, Manzanita Park. Topics include: emotional intelligence, leadership styles, listening, facilitating meetings, group dynamics and motivation, finding purpose, fostering resilience. Students will lead discussions on personal development, relationships, risky behaviors, race, ethnicity, spirituality, integrity.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Jones, J. (PI)

ESS 146B: Atmosphere, Ocean, and Climate Dynamics: the Ocean Circulation (CEE 162I, CEE 262I, EARTHSYS 146B, EARTHSYS 246B, ESS 246B)

Introduction to the physics governing the circulation of the atmosphere and ocean and their control on climate with emphasis on the large-scale ocean circulation. This course will give an overview of the structure and dynamics of the major ocean current systems that contribute to the meridional overturning circulation, the transport of heat, salt, and biogeochemical tracers, and the regulation of climate. Topics include the tropical ocean circulation, the wind-driven gyres and western boundary currents, the thermohaline circulation, the Antarctic Circumpolar Current, water mass formation, atmosphere-ocean coupling, and climate variability. Prerequisites: EESS 146A or EESS 246A, or CEE 162D or CEE 262D, or consent of instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ESS 151: Biological Oceanography (EARTHSYS 151, EARTHSYS 251, ESS 251)

Required for Earth Systems students in the oceans track. Interdisciplinary look at how oceanic environments control the form and function of marine life. Topics include distributions of planktonic production and abundance, nutrient cycling, the role of ocean biology in the climate system, expected effects of climate changes on ocean biology. Local weekend field trips. Designed to be taken concurrently with Marine Chemistry (EESS/EARTHSYS 152/252). Prerequisites: BIO 43 and EESS 8 or equivalent.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Mills, M. (PI); Selz, G. (TA)

ESS 152: Marine Chemistry (EARTHSYS 152, EARTHSYS 252, ESS 252)

Introduction to the interdisciplinary knowledge and skills required to critically evaluate problems in marine chemistry and related disciplines. Physical, chemical, and biological processes that determine the chemical composition of seawater. Air-sea gas exchange, carbonate chemistry, and chemical equilibria, nutrient and trace element cycling, particle reactivity, sediment chemistry, and diagenesis. Examination of chemical tracers of mixing and circulation and feedbacks of ocean processes on atmospheric chemistry and climate. Designed to be taken concurrently with Biological Oceanography (EESS/EARTHSYS 151/251)
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Casciotti, K. (PI)

ESS 155: Science of Soils (EARTHSYS 155)

Physical, chemical, and biological processes within soil systems. Emphasis is on factors governing nutrient availability, plant growth and production, land-resource management, and pollution within soils. How to classify soils and assess nutrient cycling and contaminant fate. Recommended: introductory chemistry and biology.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ESS 165: Advanced Geographic Information Systems (ESS 265)

Building on the Fundamentals of Geographic Information Systems course, this class delves deeper into geospatial analysis and mapping techniques. The class is heavily project-based and students are encouraged to bring their own research questions. Topics include topographic analysis, interpolation, spatial statistics, network analysis, and scripting using Python and Acrpy. All students are required to attend a weekly lab. ESS 164 or equivalent is a prerequisite.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Lyons, E. (PI)

ESS 206: World Food Economy (EARTHSYS 106, EARTHSYS 206, ECON 106, ECON 206, ESS 106)

The economics of food production, consumption, and trade. The micro- and macro- determinants of food supply and demand, including the interrelationship among food, income, population, and public-sector decision making. Emphasis on the role of agriculture in poverty alleviation, economic development, and environmental outcomes. (graduate students enroll in 206)
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ESS 210: Techniques in Environmental Microbiology

Fundamentals and application of laboratory techniques to study the diversity and activity of microorganisms in environmental samples, including soil, sediment, and water. Emphasis is on culture-independent approaches, including epifluorescence microscopy, extraction and analysis of major biomolecules (DNA, RNA, protein, lipids), stable isotope probing, and metabolic rate measurements. Format will include lectures, laboratory exercises, and discussions. Students will learn how to collect, analyze, and understand common and cutting-edge datasets in environmental microbiology.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Dekas, A. (PI)

ESS 214: Introduction to geostatistics and modeling of spatial uncertainty

Introduction of fundamental geostatistical tools for modeling spatial variability and uncertainty, and mapping of environmental attributes. Additional topics include sampling design and incorporation of different types of information (continuous, categorical) in prediction. Assignments consist of small problems to familiarize students with theoretical concepts, and applications dealing with the analysis and interpretation of various data sets (soil, water pollution, atmospheric constituents, remote sensing) primarily using Matlab. No prior programming experience is required. Open to graduates. Open to undergraduates with consent from the instructor. 3-credit option includes midterm/final or student-developed project. 4-credit option requires both. Prerequisite: College-level introductory statistics.
Terms: given next year | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ESS 244: Marine Ecosystem Modeling

This course will provide the practical background necessary to construct and implement a 2-dimensional (space and time) numerical model of a simple marine ecosystem. Instruction on computer programming, model design and parameterization, and model evaluation will be provided. Throughout the 10-week course, each student will develop and refine their own multi-component marine ecosystem model. Instructor consent required.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Arrigo, K. (PI)

ESS 246B: Atmosphere, Ocean, and Climate Dynamics: the Ocean Circulation (CEE 162I, CEE 262I, EARTHSYS 146B, EARTHSYS 246B, ESS 146B)

Introduction to the physics governing the circulation of the atmosphere and ocean and their control on climate with emphasis on the large-scale ocean circulation. This course will give an overview of the structure and dynamics of the major ocean current systems that contribute to the meridional overturning circulation, the transport of heat, salt, and biogeochemical tracers, and the regulation of climate. Topics include the tropical ocean circulation, the wind-driven gyres and western boundary currents, the thermohaline circulation, the Antarctic Circumpolar Current, water mass formation, atmosphere-ocean coupling, and climate variability. Prerequisites: EESS 146A or EESS 246A, or CEE 162D or CEE 262D, or consent of instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ESS 251: Biological Oceanography (EARTHSYS 151, EARTHSYS 251, ESS 151)

Required for Earth Systems students in the oceans track. Interdisciplinary look at how oceanic environments control the form and function of marine life. Topics include distributions of planktonic production and abundance, nutrient cycling, the role of ocean biology in the climate system, expected effects of climate changes on ocean biology. Local weekend field trips. Designed to be taken concurrently with Marine Chemistry (EESS/EARTHSYS 152/252). Prerequisites: BIO 43 and EESS 8 or equivalent.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Mills, M. (PI)

ESS 252: Marine Chemistry (EARTHSYS 152, EARTHSYS 252, ESS 152)

Introduction to the interdisciplinary knowledge and skills required to critically evaluate problems in marine chemistry and related disciplines. Physical, chemical, and biological processes that determine the chemical composition of seawater. Air-sea gas exchange, carbonate chemistry, and chemical equilibria, nutrient and trace element cycling, particle reactivity, sediment chemistry, and diagenesis. Examination of chemical tracers of mixing and circulation and feedbacks of ocean processes on atmospheric chemistry and climate. Designed to be taken concurrently with Biological Oceanography (EESS/EARTHSYS 151/251)
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Casciotti, K. (PI)

ESS 265: Advanced Geographic Information Systems (ESS 165)

Building on the Fundamentals of Geographic Information Systems course, this class delves deeper into geospatial analysis and mapping techniques. The class is heavily project-based and students are encouraged to bring their own research questions. Topics include topographic analysis, interpolation, spatial statistics, network analysis, and scripting using Python and Acrpy. All students are required to attend a weekly lab. ESS 164 or equivalent is a prerequisite.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Lyons, E. (PI)

ESS 270: Analyzing land use in a globalized world

This is a graduate level course that examines the dynamics of land use in relation to the multiple dimensions of globalization. The objective is to understand and analyze how the expansion of global trade, the emergence of new global actors, and public and private regulations affect land use changes. Beyond getting a better understanding of the dynamics of land use change, the course will enable students to better understand how to effectively influence land use change, from different vantage points: government, NGO, information broker, corporate actor. The main emphasis is on tropical regions. Lectures introduce various topics related to theories, practical cases, and evaluation tools to better understand and analyze contemporary land use dynamics. Data analyses will be conducted in the lab section, based on case studies.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ESS 280: Principles and Practices of Sustainable Agriculture (EARTHSYS 180)

Field-based training in ecologically sound agricultural practices at the Stanford Community Farm. Weekly lessons, field work, and group projects. Field trips to educational farms in the area. Topics include: soils, composting, irrigation techniques, IPM, basic plant anatomy and physiology, weeds, greenhouse management, and marketing.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 3-4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Archie, P. (PI)

ESS 292: Directed Individual Study in Earth System Science

Under supervision of an Earth System Science faculty member on a subject of mutual interest.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ESS 300: Climate studies of terrestrial environments

This course will consist of a weekly seminar covering topics of interest in Cenozoic climate. The course examines the interactions between the biosphere, atmosphere and geosphere and how these interactions influence climate. The course will cover classic and seminal papers on the controls of the oxygen, hydrogen, and carbon isotopes of the hydrosphere, atmosphere and biosphere and how they are expressed in paleoclimate proxies. Seminar will consist of reading and discussion of these papers. Students will be responsible for presenting papers. Grades will be determined by class participation. (Chamberlain)
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Chamberlain, P. (PI)

ESS 301: Topics in Earth System Science

Current topics, issues, and research related to interactions that link the oceans, atmosphere, land surfaces and freshwater systems. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

ESS 307: Research Proposal Development and Delivery

In this class students will learn how to write rigorous, high yield, multidisciplinary proposals targeting major funding agencies. The skills gained in this class are essential to any professional career, particularly in research science. Students will write a National Science Foundation style proposal involving testable hypotheses, pilot data or calculations, and broader impact. Restricted to EESS first-year, graduate students.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ESS 323: Stanford at Sea (BIOHOPK 182H, BIOHOPK 323H, EARTHSYS 323)

(Graduate students register for 323H.) Five weeks of marine science including oceanography, marine physiology, policy, maritime studies, conservation, and nautical science at Hopkins Marine Station, followed by five weeks at sea aboard a sailing research vessel in the Pacific Ocean. Shore component comprised of three multidisciplinary courses meeting daily and continuing aboard ship. Students develop an independent research project plan while ashore, and carry out the research at sea. In collaboration with the Sea Education Association of Woods Hole, MA. Only 6 units may count towards the Biology major.
Terms: Spr | Units: 16 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ESS 360: Social Structure and Social Networks (ANTHRO 360)

In this course, we will explore social network analysis, a set of methods and theories used in the analysis of social structure. The fundamental conceit underlying social network analysis is that social structure emerges from relationships between individuals. We will therefore concentrate in particular on the measurement of relationships, emphasizing especially practical methodology for anthropological fieldwork. This is a somewhat unusual course because of its focus on social network research coming out of anthropological and ethological traditions. While most current practitioners of social network analysis are (probably) sociologists, many of both the methodological antecedents and theoretical justifications for the field can be found in these two traditions. A major goal of this course is to understand how the methods and perspectives of social network analysis can be usefully incorporated into contemporary approaches to ethnography and other anthropological modes of investigation. Prerequisite: graduate standing or consent of instructor
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Jones, J. (PI)

ESS 363F: Oceanic Fluid Dynamics (CEE 363F)

Dynamics of rotating stratified fluids with application to oceanic flows. Topics include: inertia-gravity waves; geostrophic and cyclogeostrophic balance; vorticity and potential vorticity dynamics; quasi-geostrophic motions; planetary and topographic Rossby waves; inertial, symmetric, barotropic and baroclinic instability; Ekman layers; and the frictional spin-down of geostrophic flows. Prerequisite: CEE 262A or a graduate class in fluid mechanics.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ESS 385: Practical Experience in the Geosciences

On-the-job training, that may include summer internship, in applied aspects of the geosciences, and technical, organizational, and communication dimensions. Meets USCIS requirements for F-1 curricular practical training. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ESS 401: Curricular Practical Training

CPT course required for international students completing degree. Prerequisite: Earth System Science Ph.D. candidate.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Rajaratnam, B. (PI)
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