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AFRICAST 235: Designing Research-Based Interventions to Solve Global Health Problems (AFRICAST 135, EDUC 135, EDUC 335, HRP 235, HUMBIO 26, MED 235)

The excitement around social innovation and entrepreneurship has spawned numerous startups focused on tackling world problems, particularly in the fields of education and health. The best social ventures are launched with careful consideration paid to research, design, and efficacy. This course offers students insights into understanding how to effectively develop, evaluate, and scale social ventures. Using TeachAIDS (an award-winning nonprofit educational technology social venture used in 78 countries) as a primary case study, students will be given an in-depth look into how the entity was founded and scaled globally. Guest speakers will include world-class experts and entrepreneurs in Philanthropy, Medicine, Communications, Education, and Technology. Open to both undergraduate and graduate students.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Sorcar, P. (PI); Naim, K. (TA)

BIOE 376: Startup Garage: Design

A hands-on, project-based course, in which teams identify and work with users, domain experts, and industry participants to identify an unmet customer need, design new products or services that meet that need, and develop business models to support the creation and launch of startup products or services. This course integrates methods from human-centered design, lean startup, and business model planning. Each team will conceive, design, build, and field-test critical aspects of both the product or service and the business model.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

BIOE 377: Startup Garage: Testing and Launch

STRAMGT 356/BIOE 376 teams that concluded at the end of fall quarter that their preliminary product or service and business model suggest a path to viability, may continue with STRAMGT 366/BIOE 377 in winter quarter. Teams develop more elaborate versions of their product/service and business model, perform a series of experiments to test key hypotheses about their product and business model, and prepare and present an investor pitch for a seed round of financing to a panel of seasoned investors and entrepreneurs.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CEE 227: Global Project Finance

Public and private sources of finance for large, complex, capital-intensive projects in developed and developing countries. Benefits and disadvantages, major participants, risk sharing, and challenges of project finance in emerging markets. Financial, economic, political, cultural, and technological elements that affect project structures, processes, and outcomes. Case studies. Limited enrollment.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Bennon, M. (PI)

CEE 246: Entrepreneurship in Civil & Environmental Engineering

CEE 246 is a team project-based course geared toward developing entrepreneurial businesses related to civil and environmental engineering. With support of industry mentors, students are guided through the process of identifying opportunities, developing business plans, and determining funding sources. The class culminates with presentations to industry experts and venture capitalists (VC) to mimic typical investor pitches. The goal is to provide students with the knowledge and network to realize their business idea. Students must submit the following application before enrolling in this course: https://goo.gl/forms/F61Uul9x2120tR8D2
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CEE 251: Negotiation (CEE 151, EARTH 251)

Students learn to prepare for and conduct negotiations in a variety of arenas including getting a job, managing workplace conflict, negotiating transactions, and managing personal relationships. Interactive class. The internationally travelled instructor who has mediated cases in over 75 countries will require students to negotiate real life case studies and discuss their results in class. Application required before first day of class; students should enroll on Axess and complete the application on Coursework before March 18.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CEE 275S: Environmental Entrepreneurship and Innovation (CEE 175S)

Our current infrastructure for provision of critical services-clean water, energy, transportation, environmental protection; requires substantial upgrades. As a complement to the scientific and engineering innovations taking place in the environmental field, this course emphasizes the analysis of economic factors and value propositions that align value chain stakeholder interests.
Terms: Sum | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CHEM 296: Creating New Ventures in Engineering and Science-based Industries (CHEM 196, CHEMENG 196, CHEMENG 296)

Open to seniors and graduate students interested in the creation of new ventures and entrepreneurship in engineering and science intensive industries such as chemical, energy, materials, bioengineering, environmental, clean-tech, pharmaceuticals, medical, and biotechnology. Exploration of the dynamics, complexity, and challenges that define creating new ventures, particularly in industries that require long development times, large investments, integration across a wide range of technical and non-technical disciplines, and the creation and protection of intellectual property. Covers business basics, opportunity viability, creating start-ups, entrepreneurial leadership, and entrepreneurship as a career. Teaching methods include lectures, case studies, guest speakers, and individual and team projects.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CHEMENG 296: Creating New Ventures in Engineering and Science-based Industries (CHEM 196, CHEM 296, CHEMENG 196)

Open to seniors and graduate students interested in the creation of new ventures and entrepreneurship in engineering and science intensive industries such as chemical, energy, materials, bioengineering, environmental, clean-tech, pharmaceuticals, medical, and biotechnology. Exploration of the dynamics, complexity, and challenges that define creating new ventures, particularly in industries that require long development times, large investments, integration across a wide range of technical and non-technical disciplines, and the creation and protection of intellectual property. Covers business basics, opportunity viability, creating start-ups, entrepreneurial leadership, and entrepreneurship as a career. Teaching methods include lectures, case studies, guest speakers, and individual and team projects.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CHEMENG 482: The Startup Garage: Design (SOMGEN 282)

(Same as STRAMGT 356) The Startup Garage is an experiential lab course that focuses on the design, testing and launch of a new venture. Multidisciplinary student teams work through an iterative process of understanding user needs, creating a point of view statement, ideating and prototyping new product and services and their business models, and communicating the user need, product, service and business models to end-users, partners, and investors. In the autumn quarter, teams will: identify and validate a compelling user need and develop very preliminary prototypes for a new product or service and business models. Students form teams, conduct field work and iterate on the combination of business model -- product -- market. Teams will present their first prototypes (business model - product - market) at the end of the quarter to a panel of entrepreneurs, venture capitalists, angel investors and faculty.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

CHEMENG 484: The Startup Garage: Testing and Launch (SOMGEN 284)

This is the second quarter of the two-quarter series. In this quarter, student teams expand the field work they started in the fall quarter. They get out of the building to talk to potential customers, partners, distributors, and investors to test and refine their business model, product/service and market. This quarter the teams will be expected to develop and test a minimally viable product, iterate, and focus on validated lessons on: the market opportunity, user need and behavior, user interactions with the product or service, business unit economics, sale and distribution models, partnerships, value proposition, and funding strategies. Teams will interact with customers, partners, distributors, investors and mentors with the end goal of developing and delivering a funding pitch to a panel of entrepreneurs, venture capitalists, angel investors and faculty.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

DESINST 310: Negotiation by Design: Applied Design Thinking for Negotiators

Where many stakeholders are working within a complex scenario, the skilled negotiator is comfortable with the inherent ambiguity, at once nimble and careful in responding to new information and changing positions. In this advanced negotiation course, we will crack open some of the fundamental negotiation principles and show you how, where and why design thinking can add unique value to your negotiation skills and outcomes. Mapping and designing the structure and process of your negotiation; understanding tools to gain empathy for the stakeholders involved in the negotiation; learning different styles of negotiation; practicing spontaneity, adaptability and presence in the moment; team brainstorming in preparation, and team dynamics in the execution of a negotiation. You will work through exercises that isolate these skills and then apply them in simulated negotiations, at least one in every class session, to improve your confidence and competence as a negotiator. You and your teammates will then bring them all to bear in a capstone, multi-party, multi-issue negotiation simulation. If you have already taken a basic negotiation course, or have demonstrable experience, we invite you to apply. No previous design thinking experience is required, though certainly useful.nApplication required, see dschool.stanford.edu/classes for more information.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

EARTH 251: Negotiation (CEE 151, CEE 251)

Students learn to prepare for and conduct negotiations in a variety of arenas including getting a job, managing workplace conflict, negotiating transactions, and managing personal relationships. Interactive class. The internationally travelled instructor who has mediated cases in over 75 countries will require students to negotiate real life case studies and discuss their results in class. Application required before first day of class; students should enroll on Axess and complete the application on Coursework before March 18.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

EDUC 288: Organizational Analysis (SOC 271)

Principles of organizational behavior and analysis; theories of group and individual behavior; organizational culture; and applications to school organization and design. Case studies.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

EDUC 290: Instructional Leadership: Building Capacity for Excellent Teaching

This course focuses on the role of leaders in designing, supporting and sustaining excellent teaching. How do leaders create the organizational conditions to focus attention on the technical core of instruction, curriculum and assessment. Course goals: 1) explore a variety of educational leadership approaches, 2) investigate the theory of action underlying these approaches to leadership and consider the implications for instructional practice and 3) develop understanding of the relationship between the leadership approach and the learning environment.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Brazer, S. (PI)

EDUC 312: Relational Sociology (SOC 224B)

Conversations, social relationships and social networks are the core features of social life. In this course we explore how conversations, relationships, and social networks not only have their own unique and independent characteristics, but how they shape one another and come to characterize many of the settings we enter and live in. As such, students will be introduced to theories and research methodologies concerning social interaction, social relationships, and social networks, as well as descriptions of how these research strands interrelate to form a larger relational sociology that can be employed to characterize a variety of social phenomenon. This course is suitable to advanced undergraduates and doctoral students.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; McFarland, D. (PI)

EDUC 335: Designing Research-Based Interventions to Solve Global Health Problems (AFRICAST 135, AFRICAST 235, EDUC 135, HRP 235, HUMBIO 26, MED 235)

The excitement around social innovation and entrepreneurship has spawned numerous startups focused on tackling world problems, particularly in the fields of education and health. The best social ventures are launched with careful consideration paid to research, design, and efficacy. This course offers students insights into understanding how to effectively develop, evaluate, and scale social ventures. Using TeachAIDS (an award-winning nonprofit educational technology social venture used in 78 countries) as a primary case study, students will be given an in-depth look into how the entity was founded and scaled globally. Guest speakers will include world-class experts and entrepreneurs in Philanthropy, Medicine, Communications, Education, and Technology. Open to both undergraduate and graduate students.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Sorcar, P. (PI); Naim, K. (TA)

EDUC 374: Philanthropy and Civil Society (POLISCI 334, SOC 374)

Cross-listed with Law (LAW 781), Political Science (POLISCI 334) and Sociology (SOC 374). Associated with the Center for Philanthropy and Civil Society (PACS). Year-long workshop for doctoral students and advanced undergraduates writing senior theses on the nature of civil society or philanthropy. Focus is on pursuit of progressive research and writing contributing to the current scholarly knowledge of the nonprofit sector and philanthropy. Accomplished in a large part through peer review. Readings include recent scholarship in aforementioned fields. May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 9 units.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

EDUC 377B: Strategic Management of Nonprofit Organizations and Social Ventures

(Same as STRAMGT 368). This course seeks to provide a survey of the strategic, governance, and management issues facing a wide range of nonprofit organizations and their executive and board leaders, in the era of venture philanthropy and social entrepreneurship. The students will also be introduced to core managerial issues uniquely defined by this sector such as development/fundraising, investment management, performance management and nonprofit finance. The course also provides an overview of the sector, including its history and economics. Cases involve a range of nonprofits, from smaller, social entrepreneurial to larger, more traditional organizations, including education, social service, environment, health care, religion, NGO's and performing arts. In exploring these issues, this course reinforces the frameworks and concepts of strategic management introduced in the core first year courses. In addition to case discussions, the course employs role plays, study group exercises and many outsider speakers.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Meehan, B. (PI)

EDUC 377C: Philanthropy: Strategy, Innovation and Social Change

Appropriate for any student driven to effect positive social change from either the for-profit or nonprofit sector, Philanthropy will challenge students to expand their own strategic thinking about philanthropic aspiration and action. In recent decades, philanthropy has become an industry in itself - amounting to over $358 billion in the year 2014. Additionally, the last decade has seen unprecedented innovation in both philanthropy and social value creation. This course explores the key operational and strategic distinctions between traditional philanthropic entities, such as community foundations, private foundations and corporate foundations; and innovative models, including funding intermediaries, open-source platforms, technology-driven philanthropies, impact investing and venture philanthropy. Course work will include readings and case discussions that encourage students to analyze both domestic and global philanthropic strategies as they relate to foundation mission, grantmaking, evaluation, financial management, infrastructure, knowledge management, policy change and board governance. Guest speakers will consist of high profile philanthropists, foundation presidents, social entrepreneurs and Silicon Valley business leaders creating new philanthropic models. The course will also provide students with real-world grantmaking experience in completing nonprofit organizational assessments and making grants to organizations totaling $20,000.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

EDUC 377G: Problem Solving for Social Change

(Also GSBGEN 367). Stanford graduates will play important roles in solving many of today's and tomorrow's major societal problems -- such as improving educational and health outcomes, conserving energy, and reducing global poverty -- which call for actions by nonprofit, business, and hybrid organizations as well as governments. This course teaches skills and bodies of knowledge relevant to these roles through problems and case studies drawn from nonprofit organizations, for-profit social enterprises, and governments. Topics include designing, implementing, scaling, and evaluating social strategies; systems thinking; decision making under risk; psychological biases that adversely affect people's decisions; methods for influencing individuals' and organizations' behavior, ranging from incentives and penalties to "nudges;" human-centered design; corporate social responsibility; and pay-for-success programs. We will apply these concepts and tools to address an actual social problem facing Stanford University. (With the exception of several classes on strategy and evaluation, there is no substantial overlap with Paul Brest¿s and Mark Wolfson¿s course, Strategic Philanthropy and Impact Investing (GSBGEN 319), which has a different focus from this one.)
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Brest, P. (PI)

EDUC 377H: Leadership & Diversity: Topics from Education

(Same as GSBGEN 377). This course will explore the critical role diversity plays in successful organizations and challenge students to develop their own brand of leadership, learning from leaders in education who have grappled with these challenges. As impact-oriented leaders aspiring to address challenges across social, economic, and political arenas, we have an imperative to advance diversity, and education provides the perfect canvas on which to explore this imperative. High-stakes issues such as school district reform, teacher effectiveness, and the school-to-prison pipeline present complex dilemmas that demand superb leadership skills. In this course, we will: (1) explore the role that diversity plays in complex leadership challenges; (2) study a range of effective leadership approaches considering different topics in education; and (3) understand our own values and decision-making criteria, developing tactics to improve our leadership capacity. We will examine contemporary leaders and controversies from education, draw upon timeless historical thinkers, enjoy the wisdom of guest speakers, and work intensively in small groups to highlight challenges, opportunities, and tradeoffs. By exploring a range of approaches and situations, we will work to a deeper understanding of ourselves and how to become more capable, empathetic, and effective leaders.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Colby, S. (PI)

EDUC 386: Leadership and Administration in Higher Education

Definitions of leadership and leadership roles within colleges and universities. Leadership models and organizational concepts. Case study analysis of the problems and challenges facing today's higher education administrators.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EE 292I: Insanely Great Products: How do they get built?

Great products emerge from a sometimes conflict-laden process of collaboration between different functions within companies. This Seminar seeks to demystify this process via case-studies of successful products and companies. Engineering management and businesspeople will share their experiences in discussion with students. Previous companies profiled: Apple, Intel, Facebook, and Genentech -- to name a few. Previous guests include: Jon Rubinstein (NeXT, Apple, Palm), Diane Greene (VMware), and Ted Hoff (Intel). Pre-requisites: None
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Obershaw, D. (PI)

EE 402A: Topics in International Technology Management (EASTASN 402A)

Theme for Autumn 2017 is "The Rise of Commercial Space Businesses in Asia." Distinguished guest speakers from industry, governments, and universities present and discuss businesses from Asia related to outer space, including telecommunications, debris removal, payload launch services, space medicine, etc. See syllabus for specific requirements, which may differ from those of other seminars at Stanford.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Dasher, R. (PI)

EE 402T: Entrepreneurship in Asia (EALC 402T, EASTASN 402T)

Distinctive patterns and challenges of entrepreneurship in Asia; update of business and technology issues in the creation and growth of start-up companies in major Asian economies. Distinguished speakers from industry, government, and academia.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Dasher, R. (PI)

EFSLANG 694: English for Business, Industry and Professional Life

For advanced graduate students. Task-based practice of language appropriate for professional settings in industry and related teamwork. Simulation of the roles of manager, applicant, subordinate, and coworker. Prerequisite: EFSLANG 693A, or consent of instructor. Enrollment limited to 14.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-3 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Rylance, C. (PI)

ENGR 245: The Lean LaunchPad: Getting Your Lean Startup Off the Ground

Apply the "Lean Startup" principles; "business model canvas," "customer development" and "Agile Engineering" to prototype, test, and iterate your idea while discovering if you have a profitable business model. This is the class adopted by the NSF and NIH as the Innovation Corps. Apply and work in teams. Info sessions held in November and December. Team applications required in December. Proposals can be software, hardware, or service of any kind. Projects are experiential and require incrementally building the product while talking to customers/partners each week. See course website http://stanfordleanlaunchpad.weebly.com/. Prerequisite: interest and passion in exploring whether a technology idea can become a real company. Limited enrollment.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ENGR 280: From Play to Innovation

Focus is on enhancing the innovation process with playfulness. The class will be project-based and team-centered. We will investigate the human "state of play" to reach an understanding of its principal attributes and how important it is to creative thinking. We will explore play behavior, its development, and its biological basis. We will then apply those principles through design thinking to promote innovation in the corporate world. Students will work with real-world partners on design projects with widespread application. This course requires an application. You can find the application here: dschool.stanford.edu/classes
Terms: Spr | Units: 2-4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

FINANCE 385: Angel and Venture Capital Financing for Entrepreneurs and Investors

This course covers all the stages of funding for early stage high-growth companies, from seed funding to venture capital rounds to a successful exit. We will concentrate on how entrepreneurs and investors make and should make important decisions. Examples of issues that we will cover are: How can entrepreneurs raise funding successfully? What are typical mistakes entrepreneurs make in raising capital and negotiating with investors? How to choose your investor? How to pitch to an investor? How do angels and VCs generate and process their deal flow and select companies? How are VCs involved in business decisions such as recruiting talent and replacing CEOs? What are the important provisions of financial contracts between VCs and founders? How to value early-stage companies? The course is very applied and mostly case-based. We will discuss a lot of nitty-gritty details that is a must for founders and investors. Case protagonists, founders, angels, and VCs will be among guest speakers. No prior knowledge of the VC industry is needed.
Units: 3 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded

GSBGEN 515: Essentials of Strategic Communication

Successful leaders understand the power of authentic, memorable communication.nnThis course uses the lens of oral communication and presentations, to introduce the essential elements of the strategic communication strategies that make authentic, memorable communication work.nnFocusing on oral communication and presentation, we introduce the essentials of communication strategy and persuasion: audience analysis, message construction, communicator credibility, and delivery.nnDeliverables include written documents, focusing on individual and team presentations, with students receiving continuous feedback to improve their communication effectiveness, and to sharpen their authentic leadership voice.n nThis highly interactive, practical course, is focused on feedback to help students at all levels of communication mastery develop confidence in their speaking and writing. Course includes presentations, assignments, lectures, discussions, simulated activities, in-class feedback, and filmed feedback.n nIn this course you will learn to:n-Recognize strategically effective communicationn-Implement the principles of strategic communication across different platformsn-Develop clearly organized and effective presentations and documentsn-Diagnose and expand, your personal authentic communication stylennAs you make your super round selection, keep in mind that wait lists have been long for this course.
Units: 2 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded

GSBGEN 533: Technology Licensing

Licensing of technology and its corresponding intellectual property is big business, and integral to the business plans and competitive strategies of start-ups and Fortune 500 companies alike. Although the annual dollar magnitude of licenses of patents and other technology-related IP is difficult to estimate due to the proprietary nature of much of the data, academic studies peg the U.S. IP licensing market at ~$66B, and the global market at ~$180B. The development and evolution of technology standards and interoperability requirements, regulatory overlays that require technologies outside a company's core competencies, the proliferation and widespread enforcement of patents, the rapid expansion of IP-based business models, and the staggering expense and uncertain benefits of internal R&D, among other things, have combined to weigh heavily on the buy side of the make/buy scale, and to amplify the importance of inbound and outbound licensing arrangements for both start-up and Fortune 500 companies.nBecause licenses are complex legal agreements with important legal consequences, it is tempting for business executives to delegate to lawyers the negotiation of the non-economic terms of their companies' technology license agreements. The problem with such an approach, however, is that so-called "non-economic" terms can have significant and occasionally mortal economic and business consequences. While no business person should grapple with such issues in the context of a large or complex license agreement without legal counsel, it is critical that the business person understand the consequences and negotiating levers and trade-offs themselves, for at their core, the decisions to be made on these issues are business decisions, not legal ones.nThis course is organized around two hypothetical companies seeking to negotiate a technology license agreement. Both parties operate under a common set of "public"€ facts, and each responds as well to "private"€ facts relevant to various business priorities and issues. Students are divided into three-person teams, each representing one or the other of the hypothetical companies, and collaborate over multiple sessions to develop a strategic business approach and then to negotiate a licensing agreement. Lectures are focused on the business, and to a lesser extent, legal issues arising in complex licensing arrangements, and are designed to give students the context and perspective they need to participate effectively in licensing strategy development and negotiation. n By immersing teams of business students in a multi-session licensing negotiation, it is the objective of this course to enable them to better understand and think critically about the principal issues that arise in the conceptualization and negotiation of technology license agreements.
Units: 2 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded

GSBGEN 565: Political Communication: How Leaders Become Leaders

Politics, perhaps like no other arena, provides a rich and dramatic laboratory for studying the art and science of influential communication. Whether it is a local school bond election or a Congressional race, a Presidential debate or a State of the Union Address, the demanding communications of politics provide insights into our own strengths and gaps as a communicator and leader. Political campaigns, by their very nature, are highly visible, oriented toward very specific objectives, and increasingly leverage a variety of new media platforms. They are often emotionally charged, and rife with conflict and drama. The principles of political communications transcend politics, and are useful guides for leaders in business, the non-profit community, as well as government. How candidates, elected officials, and leaders in all kinds of organizations communicate vision, values, and experience, as well as how they perform in very fluid environments, not the least of which may be during a crisis, has a great deal to do with their career success. nnIn its ninth year, this highly interactive course allows students to explore both theory and practice behind effective positioning and presentation. Last year was a presidential election year in the United States, and was an extraordinary event in many respects. Students will analyze and evaluate both successful and unsuccessful communications strategies of political campaigns and candidates. They will explore historic examples of US Presidential debates, from Nixon/Kennedy to the present. Further they will experience political events as they happen -- like last year's campaigns -- with each class drawing lessons from political developments around the nation and the world. Students will also hone their own strategic communications skills in activities requiring both written and spoken communication. This is not a course in political science, American government, or in public speaking. However, the engaged student will gain insights into those areas as well.nnThe course is taught by David Demarest, Vice President of Public Affairs for Stanford University. Demarest has broad communications experience across the public and private sector in financial services, education, and government. After serving as Assistant U.S. Trade Representative, and Assistant Secretary of Labor in the Reagan Administration, in 1988 he served as Communications Director for Vice President George H. W. Bush's successful presidential campaign. He then became a member of the White House senior staff as White House Communications Director. After leaving government in 1993, he spent the next decade leading communications for two Fortune 50 companies, before coming to Stanford in 2005.
Units: 2 | Grading: GSB Student Option LTR/PF

HRP 235: Designing Research-Based Interventions to Solve Global Health Problems (AFRICAST 135, AFRICAST 235, EDUC 135, EDUC 335, HUMBIO 26, MED 235)

The excitement around social innovation and entrepreneurship has spawned numerous startups focused on tackling world problems, particularly in the fields of education and health. The best social ventures are launched with careful consideration paid to research, design, and efficacy. This course offers students insights into understanding how to effectively develop, evaluate, and scale social ventures. Using TeachAIDS (an award-winning nonprofit educational technology social venture used in 78 countries) as a primary case study, students will be given an in-depth look into how the entity was founded and scaled globally. Guest speakers will include world-class experts and entrepreneurs in Philanthropy, Medicine, Communications, Education, and Technology. Open to both undergraduate and graduate students.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Sorcar, P. (PI); Naim, K. (TA)

INDE 230: Topics in Scientific Management

Designed for postdocs and advanced graduate students. Reviews management skills necessary for successfully assuming leadership roles in scientific research. Addresses some of the most difficult aspects of developing, directing, and managing people and projects and running a research group, especially issues that new faculty have traditionally learned by trial and error over a number of years. Topics include: the faculty job search process and strategies, key elements in starting a lab, basic principles regarding legal dimensions of scientific activity (intellectual property, royalties, links with industry), team science, research ethics, communication and negotiation skills, and writing and securing grants.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

IPS 201: Managing Global Complexity

Is international relations theory valuable for policy makers? The first half of the course will provide students with a foundation in theory by introducing the dominant theoretical traditions and insights in international relations. The second half of the course focuses on several complex global problems that cut across policy specializations and impact multiple policy dimensions. Students will assess the value of major theories and concepts in international relations for analyzing and addressing such complex global policy issues.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Gould, E. (PI)

IPS 216: Making Things Happen in the Real World: Leadership and Implementation

For any problem we want to solve - reducing poverty, improving education, ending civil wars, integrating refugee populations, increasing access to quality health care - someone has to take proposed solutions and make them stick. Course emphasis is on how to make change in the real world by focusing on policy implementation: what skilled leaders do when they engage stakeholders, confront opposition, prioritize goals, find and marshal resources, fail and learn, and succeed or not. In particular, the course will tackle problems that many policy courses ignore, such as why implementation is difficult and what strategies and capacities leaders need to put plans into actions. Focus will be on case analysis and discussion led by professors from a variety of different disciplinary backgrounds in economics, pediatrics, epidemiology, public health, and political science.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ME 206A: Design for Extreme Affordability

Design for Extreme Affordability (fondly called Extreme) is a two-quarter course offered by the d.school through the School of Engineering and the Graduate School of Business. This multidisciplinary project-based experience creates an enabling environment in which students learn to design products and services that will change the lives of the world's poorest citizens. Students work directly with course partners on real world problems, the culmination of which is actual implementation and real impact. Topics include design thinking, product and service design, rapid prototype engineering and testing, business modelling, social entrepreneurship, team dynamics, impact measurement, operations planning and ethics. Possibility to travel overseas during spring break. Previous projects include d.light, Driptech, Earthenable, Embrace, the Lotus Pump, MiracleBrace, Noora Health and Sanku. Periodic design reviews; Final course presentation and expo; industry and adviser interaction. Limited enrollment via application. Must sign up for ME206A and ME206B. See extreme.stanford.edu
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ME 301: LaunchPad:Design and Launch your Product or Service

This is an intense course in product design and development offered to graduate students only (no exceptions). In just ten weeks, we will apply principles of design thinking to the real-life challenge of imagining, prototyping, testing and iterating, building, pricing, marketing, distributing and selling your product or service. You will work hard on both sides of your brain. You will experience the joy of success and the (passing) pain of failure along the way. This course is an excellent chance to practice design thinking in a demanding, fast-paced, results-oriented group with support from faculty and industry leaders. This course may change your life. We will treat each team and idea as a real start-up, so the work will be intense. If you do not have a passionate and overwhelming urge to start a business or launch a product or service, this class will not be a fit. Teams must visit office hours in winter quarter (Tuesdays 2:30p-4:00p) in order to be considered for the course.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ME 368: d.Leadership: Design Leadership in Context (MS&E 489)

d.Leadership is a course that teaches the coaching and leadership skills needed to drive good design process in groups. d.leaders will work on real projects driving design projects within organizations and gain real world skills as they experiment with their leadership style. Take this course if you are inspired by past design classes and want skills to lead design projects beyond Stanford. Preference given to students who have taken other Design Group or d.school classes. Admission by application. See dschool.stanford.edu/classes for more information
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

MED 235: Designing Research-Based Interventions to Solve Global Health Problems (AFRICAST 135, AFRICAST 235, EDUC 135, EDUC 335, HRP 235, HUMBIO 26)

The excitement around social innovation and entrepreneurship has spawned numerous startups focused on tackling world problems, particularly in the fields of education and health. The best social ventures are launched with careful consideration paid to research, design, and efficacy. This course offers students insights into understanding how to effectively develop, evaluate, and scale social ventures. Using TeachAIDS (an award-winning nonprofit educational technology social venture used in 78 countries) as a primary case study, students will be given an in-depth look into how the entity was founded and scaled globally. Guest speakers will include world-class experts and entrepreneurs in Philanthropy, Medicine, Communications, Education, and Technology. Open to both undergraduate and graduate students.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Sorcar, P. (PI); Naim, K. (TA)

MS&E 254: The Ethical Analyst

The ethical responsibility for consequences of professional analysts who use technical knowledge in support of any individual, organization, or government. The means to form ethical judgments; questioning the desirability of physical coercion and deception as a means to reach any end. Human action and relations in society in the light of previous thought, and research on the desired form of social interactions. Attitudes toward ethical dilemmas through an explicit personal code.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Howard, R. (PI)

MS&E 271: Global Entrepreneurial Marketing

Skills needed to market new technology-based products to customers around the world. Case method discussions. Cases include startups and global high tech firms. Course themes: marketing toolkit, targeting markets and customers, product marketing and management, partners and distribution, sales and negotiation, and outbound marketing. Team-based take-home final exam. Limited enrollment.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

MS&E 273: Technology Venture Formation

Open to graduate students interested in technology driven start-ups. Provides the experience of an early-stage entrepreneur seeking initial investment, including: team building, opportunity assessment, customer development, go-to-market strategy, and IP. Teaching team includes serial entrepreneurs and venture capitalists. Student teams validate the business model using R&D plans and financial projections, and define milestones for raising and using venture capital. Final exam is an investment pitch delivered to a panel of top tier VC partners. In addition to lectures, teams interact with mentors and teaching team weekly. Enrollment by application: http://www.stanford.edu/class/msande273. Recommended: 270, 271, or equivalent.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

MS&E 274: Dynamic Entrepreneurial Strategy

Primarily for graduate students. How entrepreneurial strategy focuses on creating structural change or responding to change induced externally. Grabber-holder dynamics as an analytical framework for developing entrepreneurial strategy to increase success in creating and shaping the diffusion of new technology or product innovation dynamics. Topics: First mover versus follower advantage in an emerging market; latecomer advantage and strategy in a mature market; strategy to break through stagnation; and strategy to turn danger into opportunity. Modeling, case studies, and term project.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

MS&E 275: Foundations for Large-Scale Entrepreneurship

Explore the foundational and strategic elements needed for startups to be designed for "venture scale" at inception. Themes include controversial and disruptive insights, competitive analysis, network effects, organizational design, and capital deployment. Case studies, expert guests, and experiential learning projects will be used. Primarily for graduate students. Limited enrollment. Admission by application. Recommended: basic accounting.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Miura-Ko, R. (PI)

MS&E 276: Entrepreneurial Management and Finance

For graduate students only, with a preference for engineering and science majors. Emphasis on managing high-growth, early-stage enterprises, especially those with innovation-based products and services. Students work in teams to develop skills and approaches necessary to becoming effective entrepreneurial leaders and managers. Topics include assessing risk, understanding business models, analyzing key operational metrics, modeling cash flow and capital requirements, evaluating sources of financing, structuring and negotiating investments, managing organizational culture and incentives, managing the interplay between ownership and growth, and handling adversity and failure. Limited enrollment. Admission by application. Prerequisite: basic accounting.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Byers, T. (PI); Loy, T. (PI)

MS&E 282: Transformational Leadership

The personal, team-based and organizational skills needed to become a transformative leader. Case method discussions and lectures. Themes include: personal transformation; the inside-out effect, positive intelligence, group transformation; cross-functional teams; re-engineering; rapid - non-profit and for profit - organizational transformation; and social transformation. Limited enrollment; preference to graduate students. Prerequisite: 180 or 280, or relevant work experience.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Tabrizi, B. (PI)

MS&E 284: Designing Modern Work Organizations

This practice-based experiential lab course is geared toward MS&E masters students. Students will master the concepts of organizational design, with an emphasis on applying them to modern challenges (technology, growth, globalization, and the modern workforce). Students will also gain mastery of skills necessary for success in today's workplace (working in teams, communicating verbally, presenting project work). Guest speakers from industry will present real-world challenges related to class concepts. Students will complete a quarter-long project designing and managing an actual online organization.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

MS&E 472: Entrepreneurial Thought Leaders' Seminar

Entrepreneurial leaders share lessons from real-world experiences across entrepreneurial settings. ETL speakers include entrepreneurs, leaders from global technology companies, venture capitalists, and best-selling authors. Half-hour talks followed by half hour of class interaction. Required web discussion. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

MS&E 489: d.Leadership: Design Leadership in Context (ME 368)

d.Leadership is a course that teaches the coaching and leadership skills needed to drive good design process in groups. d.leaders will work on real projects driving design projects within organizations and gain real world skills as they experiment with their leadership style. Take this course if you are inspired by past design classes and want skills to lead design projects beyond Stanford. Preference given to students who have taken other Design Group or d.school classes. Admission by application. See dschool.stanford.edu/classes for more information
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

OB 381: Conflict Management and Negotiation

Conflict is unavoidable in every organization. The key question is how it will be handled: will it escalate to dysfunctional levels or will it be effectively managed? Hence, a first aim of the course is to develop your ability to analyze conflicts, to look beneath the surface rhetoric of a conflict, to isolate the important underlying interests, and to determine what sort of agreement (if any) is feasible. We'll analyze which negotiation strategies are effective in different conflicts. We'll also examine psychological and structural factors that create conflict and often pose a barrier to its resolution. But understanding how to analyze a conflict is not enough. To manage conflict effectively, you need a broad repertoire of behavioral skills. Developing these is the second aim of the course. To achieve this, negotiation exercises are used in every session. When playing a role in a simulated conflict, you will be free to try out tactics that might feel uncomfortable in a real one. You will get feedback from your classmates about how you come across. In sum, you can use this course to expand your repertoire of skills, to hone your skills, and to become more adept in choosing when to apply each skill.
Units: 3 | Grading: GSB Student Option LTR/PF

OB 512: Creating, Building, and Sustaining Breakthrough Ventures

This course is designed to provide students with a summary of entrepreneurial processes that have successfully created, developed, and sustained breakthrough ventures. By "breakthrough" we mean ventures that have a lasting and positive impact, touching millions of lives. Examples are based on the experiences of Norman Winarsky, formerly President of SRI Ventures, Charles O¿Reilly, and invited speakers who are leading investors and entrepreneurs. They include companies like Siri, Nuance, Intuitive Surgical, Sandisk, Facebook, and others. nnThink of this course as a ¿master class¿. You will work with the professors and invited speakers to create and build your venture concept. We focus on all elements of building a breakthrough company, starting with the source of breakthrough venture ideas, advancing to building a great value proposition and business plan, recruiting a team, finding investors and board members, scaling the company, deciding whether to sell or go IPO, and ending with what it takes to build a company that can sustain itself through continuous innovation. At each step, we follow examples of companies we've helped build, and provide lessons of success as well as failure. The course will be highly interactive, and engage students in elements of building their own venture concepts.
Units: 2 | Grading: GSB Pass/Fail

PHIL 275A: Ethics and Politics of Public Service (CSRE 178, ETHICSOC 133, HUMBIO 178, PHIL 175A, POLISCI 133, PUBLPOL 103D, URBANST 122)

Ethical and political questions in public service work, including volunteering, service learning, humanitarian assistance, and public service professions such as medicine and teaching. Motives and outcomes in service work. Connections between service work and justice. Is mandatory service an oxymoron? History of public service in the U.S. Issues in crosscultural service work. Integration with the Haas Center for Public Service to connect service activities and public service aspirations with academic experiences at Stanford.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Coyne, B. (PI)

SOC 220: Interpersonal Relations (SOC 120)

(Graduate students register for 220.) Forming ties, developing norms, status, conformity, deviance, social exchange, power, and coalition formation; important traditions of research have developed from the basic theories of these processes. Emphasis is on understanding basic theories and drawing out their implications for change in a broad range of situations, families, work groups, and friendship groups.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Ridgeway, C. (PI)

SOC 356: Strategy and Organizations

Why are some organizations more competitive than others?  This is one of the defining questions of the interdisciplinary research field known as strategic management.  In this seminar, we will survey the field of strategic management as seen through the lens of organization theory, touching on the four main theoretical approaches that have developed there.nnnMost work in strategic management pays little attention to particular theoretical perspectives, and is organized more by the topic - the phenomenon being studied - such as market exit, growth, performance, mergers and acquisitions, innovation, and the like.  I have catalogued the research in strategic management both according to theoretical perspective and topic, and that structure is developed in this course.  Our goal is to help you to identify theoretical perspectives as you try to understand the strategy field.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

SOMGEN 275: Leading Value Improvement in Health Care Delivery

Successful leaders on the journey to better care delivery methods with lower total spending inevitably face pivotal crises. What confluence of attitude, strategy, and events allows them to prevail? Contexts will include entrepreneurship and early stage investing, spread of higher value care delivery innovations, health care delivery system management, and private and public policy making to reward value. Guest faculty will include nationally recognized leaders and change agents, who will invite students to recommend alternative approaches to managing pivotal challenges. The course is open to any member of the Stanford community aspiring to lead higher value in health care delivery including graduate students, undergraduates, and postdoctoral candidates, as well as medical center residents and clinical fellows. May be repeated for credit
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

SOMGEN 282: The Startup Garage: Design (CHEMENG 482)

(Same as STRAMGT 356) The Startup Garage is an experiential lab course that focuses on the design, testing and launch of a new venture. Multidisciplinary student teams work through an iterative process of understanding user needs, creating a point of view statement, ideating and prototyping new product and services and their business models, and communicating the user need, product, service and business models to end-users, partners, and investors. In the autumn quarter, teams will: identify and validate a compelling user need and develop very preliminary prototypes for a new product or service and business models. Students form teams, conduct field work and iterate on the combination of business model -- product -- market. Teams will present their first prototypes (business model - product - market) at the end of the quarter to a panel of entrepreneurs, venture capitalists, angel investors and faculty.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

SOMGEN 284: The Startup Garage: Testing and Launch (CHEMENG 484)

This is the second quarter of the two-quarter series. In this quarter, student teams expand the field work they started in the fall quarter. They get out of the building to talk to potential customers, partners, distributors, and investors to test and refine their business model, product/service and market. This quarter the teams will be expected to develop and test a minimally viable product, iterate, and focus on validated lessons on: the market opportunity, user need and behavior, user interactions with the product or service, business unit economics, sale and distribution models, partnerships, value proposition, and funding strategies. Teams will interact with customers, partners, distributors, investors and mentors with the end goal of developing and delivering a funding pitch to a panel of entrepreneurs, venture capitalists, angel investors and faculty.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

STRAMGT 308: Entrepreneurship from Diverse Perspectives

This seminar showcases the diversity of entrepreneurs and the range of entrepreneurial paths they pursue. Thirty-five entrepreneurs and venture capitalists, primarily woman and under-represented minorities, will share their personal and professional journeys, and how each embodies the entrepreneurial mindset. Case studies, readings and videos, will complement in-class discussions with the speakers in exploring the entire entrepreneurial process from finding an idea and forming and building a team, to being an inclusive leader, raising money, assembling a board, and overcoming setbacks and challenges. The class teaches the entrepreneurial mindset, and how everyone can be entrepreneurial in their lives. Teams will work on creating an idea for a company during the quarter.
Units: 3 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded

STRAMGT 353: Entrepreneurship: Formation of New Ventures

This course is offered for students who at some time may want to undertake an entrepreneurial career by pursuing opportunities leading to partial or full ownership and control of a business. The course deals with case situations from the point of view of the entrepreneur/manager rather than the passive investor. Many cases involve visitors, since the premise is that opportunity and action have large idiosyncratic components. Students must assess opportunity and action in light of the perceived capabilities of the individuals and the nature of the environments they face. The course is integrative and will allow students to apply many facets of their business school education. Each section will have a specific focus, please select the instructor(s) with your interests: Leslie, Bowman - High tech ventures; Ellis, Saloner - Diverse types of ventures; Foster, Brady - Diverse types of ventures; Reiss, Chess - Very early stage ventures.
Units: 4 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded

STRAMGT 356: The Startup Garage: Design

Startup Garage is an intensive hands-on, project-based course, in which students will apply the concepts of design thinking, engineering, finance, business and organizational skills to design and test new business concepts that address real world needs . Our aspiration is to help teams identify an unmet customer need, design new products or services that meet that need, and develop business models to support the creation and launch of startup products or services. Even those teams that do not successfully launch a venture, or individuals who decide not to move forward, will learn critical, cutting-edge techniques about starting and launching a venture. Collaborative, multi-disciplinary teams will identify and work with users, domain experts, and industry participants to identify and deeply understand customer needs, then proceed to design products or services and a business model to address those needs. Each team will conceive, design, build, and field-test critical aspects of both the product or service and the business model. This course is offered by the Graduate School of Business. It integrates methods from human-centered design, lean startup, and business model planning. The course focuses on developing entrepreneurial skills (using short lectures and in-class exercises) and then applying these skills to specific problems faced by those users identified by the teams. Teams will get out of the building and interact directly with users and advisers to develop a deep understanding of the challenges they face and to field test their proposed services, products, and business models.
Units: 4 | Grading: GSB Student Option LTR/PF

STRAMGT 371: Strategic Management of Technology and Innovation

This course focuses on the strategic management of technology-based innovation in the firm. The purpose is to provide students with concepts, frameworks, and experiences that are useful for taking part in the management of innovation processes in both startups and large technology-focused organizations. The course examines how leaders can manage fast-changing technological innovations effectively. Specific topics include: assessing the innovative capabilities of the firm, managing the technical function in a company, navigating the interfaces between functional groups in the development function in the firm, understanding and managing technical entrepreneurs, building technology-based distinctive competencies and competitive advantages, technological leadership versus followership in competitive strategy, institutionalizing innovation, attracting and keeping entrepreneurs.
Units: 4 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded

STRAMGT 381: Leading Strategic Change in the Health Care Industry

In this seminar we will study the structure and dynamics of the U.S. health care industry, especially in the face of ongoing regulatory change, and ways it intersects with the global health care industry.n nThe seminar's aim is to develop participants' ability to create strategically informed action plans that are imaginative, inspiring and workable in this highly dynamic environment. The seminar's pedagogy involves informed debate to evaluate and hone well-researched views by the participants and instructors, as well as the writing and presentation of position papers by small groups of seminar participants on the key dynamics of the industry.nnIn the course of the seminar discussions, we aim to deepen our understanding of strategic dynamics and transformational change at the societal, industry and organizational levels of analysis. After developing a complete picture of the structure of the health care industry and the strategic relationships among the key players ("the strategic landscape"), the seminar will focus on how health care reform and other external forces will affect the strategic opportunities and challenges of four types of players in the strategic landscape: (1) incumbents; (2) entrepreneurial startups; (3) cross-boundary disruptors; and (4) international health care providers. World-class leaders in health care will be brought in to supplement our understanding of each one of these players.n nStudent teams will be formed to focus on one of the four types of players. Each team will prepare a research paper focused on determining how their type of player can take advantage of the regulatory, technological, social, cultural and demographic changes, and who will be the likely winners and why.
Units: 3 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded

STRAMGT 547: Riding The Next Wave in Developing Economies

Today, technology-driven ventures continue to disrupt industries around the world and entrepreneurial ecosystems in developing economies are evolving, creating a better backdrop for entrepreneurs and investors who wish to explore high potential opportunities. Despite following the lead of Silicon Valley, the most advanced ecosystem in the world, these newly formed networks that include universities, incubators, accelerator programs, angel investor organizations and venture capital firms are still lacking. Consequently, investors and founders face distinct challenges that they would not encounter in Silicon Valley including access to local markets, lack of funding, inadequate talent pools and complex legal and political context. As developing economies grow and become more connected, new and exciting entrepreneurial opportunities arise across markets and industries. Smartphones, the best sensors on earth have already been deployed and new technologies, such as Machine Learning and Blockchain, will allow problems to be solved at a scale like never seen before. nnnThe cases and guests will reveal entrepreneurial challenges through the eyes of founders and investors that have seized these opportunities at different stages of the venture: ideation, launch and escalation. This course is designed to showcase innovative companies in high growth industries such as consumer Internet, financial services, health care and education. It will feature the latest trends and opportunities in Asia, Middle East, Africa and Latin America. By taking this course, you will be better equipped to observe and explain developing economy ecosystems and the opportunities and challenges they present.
Units: 2 | Grading: GSB Student Option LTR/PF

STRAMGT 573: Moore's Law and the Convergence of Computing and Communications; Strategic Thinking in Action

This six-session (2-unit) Bass seminar focuses on strategic leadership and builds on core strategic leadership coursework in the MBA program. The course uses the seminar format with expectations of extensive contributions from all students to the discussion in each session. Through seminar discussions, we aim to deepen our understanding of strategic dynamics and transformational change at the industry and organizational levels of analysis in dynamic environments. The seminar's aim is to improve participants' ability to develop strategically informed action plans that are imaginative, inspiring and workable. nnThe seminar's conceptual frameworks include traditional tools of strategic and competitive analysis from the core MBA course on strategic leadership, conceptual frameworks developed by the instructors that help understand the role of strategy-making in the evolution and transformation of organizations and industries, and theoretical frameworks that help understand the interplays between technology strategy and corporate strategy. Three of the six session will feature discussions with senior executives from key industry players. The seminar's pedagogy involves informed debate including with the guest executives to evaluate and hone well-researched views by the participants as well as the writing and presentation of position papers by small groups of seminar participants concerning the seminar's analytical topics.nnIn this fall's seminar we will examine the evolution of the global semiconductor industry in light of the ongoing impact of Moore's Law and the convergence of computing and wireless communications industries, and how it has been and will be affected by strategic actions of entrepreneurial startups, incumbent corporations, and governments in multiple geographies.nnSeveral interrelated topics will be discussed as they impact three key industry segments of the global semiconductor industry that are the focus of the seminar.
Units: 2 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded

STRAMGT 574: Strategic Thinking in Action - In Business and Beyond (II)

This six-session 2-point Bass seminar will involve students (maximum 24) in analyzing the emerging global electric automotive industry by focusing on: (1) The electric automotive industry in the U.S. and Europe, (2) the electric automotive industry in Japan and Korea, and (3) the electric automotive industry in China. We will each time examine the strategies of the key automotive companies as well as that of the government and other key players such as infrastructure providers. The purpose of the seminar is to help students sharpen their skills in identifying facilitating and impeding forces of strategic change, and in assessing and estimating the direction and rate of strategic change. While the instructors will provide relevant pre- readings related to these topics, students will be expected to complement these materials with their own research of theoretical and empirical sources. They will also be expected to help structure the discussion and move it forward toward conclusions. Students will organize into three teams each focused on one of the regions and prepare a five-to-ten page group report of their most important findings and conclusions that extend current knowledge.
Units: 2 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded

STRAMGT 584: Assessing High Impact Business Models in Emerging Markets

In recent years, we've seen an explosion of innovative business models blazing new trails in emerging markets. Many of these models are achieving commercial success while transforming the lives of low-income populations. Using nine cases of both early-stage, entrepreneur-led ventures and later-stage, public or large-cap firms, this course will examine best practices for scaling new enterprises in emerging markets. It will do so primarily through the lens of a potential investor. It will also explore what is required to spark, nurture and scale entire sectors that serve rapidly growing, often low-income markets. What does it mean to work in markets with limited infrastructure? What common mistakes are made - whether in business model design, in supply chains, or in dealing with government - and how can we avoid them? Which are the best business models to serve markets that corporations have traditionally ignored, and in which government has failed to deliver? Who might be threatened by the success of these new businesses? The seminar is a good match for Stanford students interested in working or investing in emerging markets. It will be taught by Matt Bannick, who leads Omidyar Network (a $1 billion impact investing fund) and is the former President of eBay International and of PayPal.
Units: 2 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded

SUST 231: Design Thinking for Sustainable Impact

Design Thinking is an exceptionally versatile methodology that combines creativity, human centeredness, design skills, critical thinking, and hands-on building of solutions as an approach to rapidly tackle ill-defined challenges. This boot-camp class immerses students in the cognitive modes, theory, skill-sets, mind-sets, and tools associated with Design Thinking to solve real world challenges aimed at sustainable impact. This project based class gives students an immersive experience in theory, tools, and practice of design thinking in the context of sustainability challenges.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Gosling, K. (PI)

WELLNESS 114: Emotional Social Intelligence: Increasing Life Effectiveness

Examine, understand, and develop emotional and social intelligence (ESI). Presents leading models of and skills for enhancing emotional and social intelligence in order to measurably increase life effectiveness. Blends course lecture, discussion, peer coaching, and guided practice to develop theoretical and practical knowledge of ESI. Assess, understand, and utilize ESI strengths and mitigate weaknesses in order to enhance stress management and resilience, increase self-other awareness, and increase balanced productivity and impact.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Chima, A. (PI)
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