Print Settings
 

ECON 1: Principles of Economics

This is an introductory course in economics. We will cover both microeconomics (investigating decisions by individuals and firms) and macroeconomics (examining the economy as a whole). The primary goal is to develop and then build on your understanding of the analytical tools and approaches used by economists. This will help you to interpret economic news and economic data at a much deeper level while also forming your own opinions on economic issues. The course will also provide a strong foundation for those of you who want to continue on with intermediate microeconomics and/or intermediate macroeconomics and possibly beyond. In Spring 2017-2018 Econ 1 will use all class time for team-based learning instead of lectures; class attendance will be mandatory, and enrollment will be limited to 120 students.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ECON 10: Microcosm of Silicon Valley and Wall Street

Seminar in applied economics with focus on the microcosm of Silicon Valley, how growth companies are originated, managed and financed from start-up to IPO. Round-table discussion format. Applicable to those students with an interest in technology company formation, growth and finance including interaction with Wall Street. Enrollment limited to 10 juniors, seniors and co-term students.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Shanahan, T. (PI)

ECON 13N: Experimental Economics

This freshman seminar is for students who are interested in economics and want to get a hands on, front row experience with research. The goal of the seminar is to come up, as a group, with a research topic and question and implement an experiment to address the question.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Niederle, M. (PI)

ECON 14: Navigating Financial Crises in the Modern Global Economy (PUBLPOL 14)

What causes financial crises? What are the keys to anticipating, preventing, and managing disruptions in the global financial system? This course prepares students to navigate future episodes as policymakers, finance professionals, and citizens by going inside the practical decisions made in an unfolding crisis, from the U.S. government and IMF to the boardroom and trading floor. Students will learn warning signs of distress; market structures that govern crisis dynamics; strategic interactions among the key actors; and lessons learned for creating a more resilient system. Concepts will be applied to real-world experiences in emerging market crises, the U.S. housing and global financial crisis, and the European sovereign crisis, as well as prospective risks from China's financial system and unwinding of extraordinary central bank stimulus.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Toloui, R. (PI)

ECON 15Q: The Economics of Immigration in the US: Past and Present

The United States has long been perceived as a land of opportunity for immigrants. Yet, both in the past and today, policy makers have often expressed concerns that immigrants fail to integrate into US society and lower wages for existing workers. There is an increasingly heated debate about how strict migration policy should be. This debate is rarely based on discussion of facts about immigrants assimilation. This class will review the literature on historical and contemporary migrant flows. We will tackle three major questions in the economics of immigration: whether immigrants were positively or negatively selected from their sending countries; how immigrants assimilated into the US economy and society; and what effects that immigration may have on the economy, including the effect of immigration on native employment and wages. In each case, we will present studies covering the two main eras of US immigration history, the Age of Mass Migration from Europe (1850-1920) and the recent period of renewed mass migration from Asia and Latin America. Students will participate in a final project, which could include developing their own recommendations for how to design immigration policy in the US. Prerequisite: Econ 1
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Abramitzky, R. (PI)

ECON 17N: Energy, the Environment, and the Economy

Examines the intimate relationship between environmental quality and the production and consumption of energy. Assesses the economics efficiency and political economy implications of a number of current topics in energy and environmental economics. Topics include: the economic theory of exhaustible resources, Greenhouse Gas Emissions (GHG) control (cap and trade mechanisms and carbon fees), GHG emissions offsets, the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR), the "smart" transmission grid for electricity, nuclear energy and nuclear waste, the real cost of renewable energy, natural gas and coal-fired electricity production, the global coal and natural gas markets, Corporate Average Fuel Efficiency (CAFE) and Low-Carbon Fuel Standards (LCFS), Energy Efficiency Investments and Demand Response, and Carbon Capture and Sequestration (CCS). For all topics, there will be reading to explain the economics and engineering behind the topic and class discussion to clarify and elaborate on this interaction.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Wolak, F. (PI)

ECON 50: Economic Analysis I

Individual consumer and firm behavior under perfect competition. The role of markets and prices in a decentralized economy. Monopoly in partial equilibrium. Economic tools developed from multivariable calculus using partial differentiation and techniques for constrained and unconstrained optimization. Prerequisites: Econ 1 or 1V, and Math 51 or Math 51A or CME 100 or CME 100A.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Math, WAY-FR, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ECON 51: Economic Analysis II

Neoclassical analysis of general equilibrium, welfare economics, imperfect competition, externalities and public goods, risk and uncertainty, game theory, adverse selection, and moral hazard. Multivariate calculus is used. Prerequisite: ECON 50.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-FR, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Makler, C. (PI)

ECON 101: Economic Policy Seminar

Economic policy analysis, writing, and oral presentation. Topics vary with instructor. Limited enrollment. Prerequisites: Econ 51 and 52, 102B, and two field courses. Some sections require additional prerequisites.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ECON 102A: Introduction to Statistical Methods (Postcalculus) for Social Scientists

Probabilistic modeling and statistical techniques relevant for economics. Concepts include: probability trees, conditional probability, random variables, discrete and continuous distributions, correlation, central limit theorems, point estimation, hypothesis testing and confidence intervals for both one and two populations. Prerequisite: MATH 20 or equivalent.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Math, WAY-AQR, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; McKeon, S. (PI)

ECON 102B: Applied Econometrics

Hypothesis tests and confidence intervals for population variances, chi-squared goodness-of-fit tests, hypothesis tests for independence, simple linear regression model, testing regression parameters, prediction, multiple regression, omitted variable bias, multicollinearity, F-tests, regression with indicator random variables, simultaneous equation models and instrumental variables. Topics vary slightly depending on the quarter. Prerequisites: Econ 102A or equivalent. Recommended: computer experience (course often uses STATA software to run regressions).
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; McKeon, S. (PI)

ECON 102C: Advanced Topics in Econometrics

The program evaluation problem. Identifying and estimating the effects of policies on outcomes of interest (e.g., tax rates on labor supply, etc.). Identifying and estimating the effects of human capital on earnings and other labor market outcomes. Topics: Instrumental variables estimation; limited dependent variable models (probit, logit, Tobit models); Panel data techniques (fixed and random effect models, dynamic panel data models); Duration models; Bootstrap and Estimation by Simulation. Prerequisite: Econ 102B
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Pistaferri, L. (PI)

ECON 139D: Directed Reading

May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Abramitzky, R. (PI); Admati, A. (PI); Alsan, M. (PI); Amador, M. (PI); Amemiya, T. (PI); Aoki, M. (PI); Arora, A. (PI); Athey, S. (PI); Attanasio, O. (PI); Auclert, A. (PI); Bagwell, K. (PI); Baron, D. (PI); Bekaert, G. (PI); Bernheim, B. (PI); Bettinger, E. (PI); Bhattacharya, J. (PI); Bloom, N. (PI); Boskin, M. (PI); Brady, D. (PI); Bresnahan, T. (PI); Brest, P. (PI); Bulow, J. (PI); Canellos, C. (PI); Carroll, G. (PI); Chandrasekhar, A. (PI); Chaudhary, L. (PI); Chen, L. (PI); Chetty, R. (PI); Clerici-Arias, M. (PI); Cogan, J. (PI); Cojoc, D. (PI); David, P. (PI); DeGiorgi, G. (PI); Diamond, R. (PI); Dickstein, M. (PI); Donaldson, D. (PI); Duffie, D. (PI); Duggan, M. (PI); Dupas, P. (PI); Einav, L. (PI); Fafchamps, M. (PI); Falcon, W. (PI); Fearon, J. (PI); Fitzgerald, D. (PI); Fitzpatrick, M. (PI); Fong, K. (PI); Foster, G. (PI); Fuchs, V. (PI); Garber, A. (PI); Gentzkow, M. (PI); Gould, A. (PI); Goulder, L. (PI); Greif, A. (PI); Haak, D. (PI); Haber, S. (PI); Hall, R. (PI); Hammond, P. (PI); Hansen, P. (PI); Hanson, W. (PI); Hanushek, E. (PI); Harding, M. (PI); Harris, D. (PI); Hartmann, W. (PI); Henry, P. (PI); Hickman, B. (PI); Hong, H. (PI); Hope, N. (PI); Horvath, M. (PI); Hoxby, C. (PI); Imbens, G. (PI); Jackson, M. (PI); Jagolinzer, A. (PI); Jaimovich, N. (PI); Jarosch, G. (PI); Jayachandran, S. (PI); Jones, C. (PI); Jost, J. (PI); Judd, K. (PI); Kastl, J. (PI); Kehoe, P. (PI); Kessler, D. (PI); Klausner, M. (PI); Klenow, P. (PI); Kochar, A. (PI); Kojima, F. (PI); Kolstad, C. (PI); Koudijs, P. (PI); Krueger, A. (PI); Kuran, T. (PI); Kurlat, P. (PI); Kurz, M. (PI); Lambert, N. (PI); Larsen, B. (PI); Lau, L. (PI); Lazear, E. (PI); Levin, J. (PI); Lynham, J. (PI); MaCurdy, T. (PI); Mahajan, A. (PI); Malmendier, U. (PI); Manova, K. (PI); McClellan, M. (PI); McKinnon, R. (PI); Meier, G. (PI); Milgrom, P. (PI); Miller, G. (PI); Morten, M. (PI); Moser, P. (PI); Naylor, R. (PI); Nechyba, T. (PI); Niederle, M. (PI); Noll, R. (PI); Owen, B. (PI); Oyer, P. (PI); Pencavel, J. (PI); Persson, P. (PI); Piazzesi, M. (PI); Pistaferri, L. (PI); Polinsky, A. (PI); Qian, Y. (PI); Rangel, A. (PI); Reiss, P. (PI); Richards, J. (PI); Roberts, J. (PI); Romano, J. (PI); Romer, P. (PI); Rosenberg, N. (PI); Rossi-Hansberg, E. (PI); Rosston, G. (PI); Roth, A. (PI); Rothwell, G. (PI); Royalty, A. (PI); Rozelle, S. (PI); Sargent, T. (PI); Schaffner, J. (PI); Scheuer, F. (PI); Schneider, M. (PI); Segal, I. (PI); Sharpe, W. (PI); Shotts, K. (PI); Shoven, J. (PI); Singleton, K. (PI); Skrzypacz, A. (PI); Sorkin, I. (PI); Sprenger, C. (PI); Staiger, R. (PI); Stanton, F. (PI); Sweeney, J. (PI); Taylor, J. (PI); Tendall, M. (PI); Tertilt, M. (PI); Topper, M. (PI); Vytlacil, E. (PI); Wacziarg, R. (PI); Weingast, B. (PI); Wilson, R. (PI); Wolak, F. (PI); Wolitzky, A. (PI); Wright, G. (PI); Wright, M. (PI); Yotopoulos, P. (PI); Ponce, S. (GP); Sheeler, P. (GP)

ECON 143: Finance and Society for non-MBAs (IPS 227, MS&E 147, POLISCI 127A, PUBLPOL 143)

The financial system is meant to help people, businesses, and governments fund, invest, and manage risks, but it is rife with conflicts of interests and may allow people with more information and control to harm those with less of both. In this interdisciplinary course we explore the forces that shape the financial system and how individuals and society can benefit most from this system without being unnecessarily harmed and endangered. Topics include the basic principles of investment, the role and ¿dark side¿ of debt, corporations and their governance, banks and other financial institutions, why effective financial regulations are essential yet often fail, and political and ethical issues in finance. The approach will be rigorous and analytical but not overly technical mathematically. Prerequisite: Econ 1
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ECON 149: The Modern Firm in Theory and Practice

Examines the empirics on the economics, management and strategy of organizations (e.g. firms). Topics include the organization of firms in US and internationally. Management practices around information systems, target setting and human resources. Focus on management practices in manufacturing, but also analyze retail, hospitals and schools, plus some recent field-experiments in developing countries. Prerequisites: ECON 51 (Public Policy majors may take PUBLPOL 51 as a substitute for ECON 51), ECON 102B.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ECON 150: Economic Policy Analysis (PUBLPOL 104, PUBLPOL 204)

The relationship between microeconomic analysis and public policy making. How economic policy analysis is done and why political leaders regard it as useful but not definitive in making policy decisions. Economic rationales for policy interventions, methods of policy evaluation and the role of benefit-cost analysis, economic models of politics and their application to policy making, and the relationship of income distribution to policy choice. Theoretical foundations of policy making and analysis, and applications to program adoption and implementation. Prerequisites: ECON 50 and ECON 102B. Undergraduate Public Policy students are required to take this class for a letter grade and enroll in this class for five units.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ECON 152: The Future of Finance (ECON 252, PUBLPOL 364, STATS 238)

(Same as Law 1038) If you are interested in a career in finance or that touches finance (computational science, economics, public policy, legal, regulatory, corporate, other), this course will give you a useful perspective. We will take on hot topics in the current landscape of global financial markets such as how the world has evolved post-financial crisis, how it is being disrupted by FinTech, RegTech, artificial intelligence, crowd financing, blockchain, machine learning & robotics (to name a few), how it is being challenged by IoT, cyber, financial warfare & crypto currency risks (to name a few) and how it is seizing new opportunities in fast-growing areas such as ETFs, new instruments/payment platforms, robo advising, big data & algorithmic trading (to name a few). The course will include guest-lecturer perspectives on how sweeping changes are transforming business models and where the greatest opportunities exist for students entering or touching the world of finance today including existing, new and disruptive players. While derivatives and other quantitative concepts will be handled in a non-technical way, some knowledge of finance and the capital markets is presumed. Elements used in grading: Class Participation, Attendance, Final Paper. Consent Application: To apply for this course, students must complete and email to the instructors the Consent Application Form, which is available on the Public Policy Program's website at https://publicpolicy.stanford.edu/academics/undergraduate/forms. See Consent Application Form for submission deadline.
Terms: Win | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Beder, T. (PI)

ECON 154: Law and Economics (PUBLPOL 106, PUBLPOL 206)

This course explores the role of law in promoting well-being (happiness). Law, among its other functions, can serve as a mechanism to harmonize private incentives with cooperative gains, to maintain an equitable division of those gains, and to deter "cheating" and dystopia. Law is thus essential to civilization. Economic analysis of law focuses on the welfare-enhancing incentive effects of law and its enforcement and on law's role in reducing the risks of cooperation, achieved by fixing expectations of what courts or the state will do in various futures. Prerequisite: ECON 51 or PUBLPOL 51.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ECON 155: Environmental Economics and Policy

Economic sources of environmental problems and alternative policies for dealing with them (technology standards, emissions taxes, and marketable pollution permits). Evaluation of policies addressing local air pollution, global climate change, and the use of renewable resources. Connections between population growth, economic output, environmental quality, sustainable development, and human welfare. Prerequisite: ECON 50. May be taken concurrently with consent of the instructor.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Goulder, L. (PI)

ECON 159: Economic, Legal, and Political Analysis of Climate-Change Policy (EARTHSYS 159, ECON 209, PUBLPOL 159)

This course will advance students understanding of economic, legal, and political approaches to avoiding or managing the problem of global climate change. Theoretical contributions as well as empirical analyses will be considered. It will address economic issues, legal constraints, and political challenges associated with various emissions-reduction strategies, and it will consider policy efforts at the local, national, and international levels. Specific topics include: interactions among overlapping climate policies, the strengths and weaknesses of alternative policy instruments, trade-offs among alternative policy objectives, and decision making under uncertainty. Prerequisites: Econ 50 or its equivalent.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ECON 160: Game Theory and Economic Applications

Introduction to game theory and its applications to economics. Topics: strategic and extensive form games, dominant strategies, Nash equilibrium, subgame-perfect equilibrium, and Bayesian equilibrium. The theory is applied to repeated games, voting, auctions, and bargaining with examples from economics and political science. Prerequisites: Working knowledge of calculus and basic probability theory.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-FR, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Saraniti, B. (PI)

ECON 166: International Trade

Explaining patterns of trade among nations; characterizing the sources of comparative advantage in production and the prospect of gains from economies of scale. Enumerating and accounting for the net aggregate gains from trade, and identifying winners and losers from globalization. Analyzing the effects of international labor migration, foreign direct investment, outsourcing, and multinational companies. Strategic trade policy; international trade agreements; labor and environmental implications. We will review relevant theoretical frameworks, examine empirical evidence, and discuss historical and contemporary policy debates as covered in the popular press; active class participation is an important part of the course. Prerequisite: ECON 51 (Public Policy majors may take PUBLPOL 51 as a substitute for ECON 51).
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ECON 178: Behavioral Economics

The field of behavioral economics draws on insights from other disciplines, especially psychology, to enrich our understanding of economic behavior. The course will discuss how people may display systematic behavioral patterns that diverge from the predictions of standard economic models, as well as the ways in which economists incorporate those considerations into their theories, and the implications of those theories for market outcomes and public policies. Prerequisites: ECON 50 and ECON 102A. Econ 51 is recommended.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ECON 183: The Cardinal Fund

This is an experiential course that will cover the important concepts that underlying investment theory in Financial Economics. Students will manage an investment portfolio of at least $1 million dollars. In doing so they will learn how risk and return are related in public capital markets. Students are expected to spend a substantial amount of time outside the classroom applying the knowledge they learn in the class. Prerequisites: Econ 51 (or IPS 204A, PublPol 301A), Econ 102B (or Stats 141, Stats 110, CEE 203, Earthsys 160, Educ 200C, Linguist 277, Psych 252), Econ 140 (or Econ 135), Econ 190 (or MS&E 140). Not accepting new students for 2017/2018.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ECON 191: Introduction to Cost Accounting

Focuses on how managers use accounting information for decision making. Students will study product and service costing, activity based costing, performance management and evaluation, CVP analysis, forecasting, factors to be considered in pricing decision, capital investment analysis, and quality management and measurement.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Clerici-Arias, M. (PI)

ECON 199D: Honors Thesis Research

In-depth study of an appropriate question and completion of a thesis of very high quality. Normally written under the direction of a member of the Department of Economics (or some closely related department). See description of honors program. Register for at least 1 unit for at least one quarter after your honors application is approved. Winter registration for one unit under the supervision of the Director of the Honors Program is mandatory for all honors students.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Abramitzky, R. (PI); Admati, A. (PI); Alsan, M. (PI); Amador, M. (PI); Amemiya, T. (PI); Aoki, M. (PI); Arora, A. (PI); Athey, S. (PI); Attanasio, O. (PI); Auclert, A. (PI); Bagwell, K. (PI); Bekaert, G. (PI); Benkard, L. (PI); Bernheim, B. (PI); Bettinger, E. (PI); Bhattacharya, J. (PI); Bloom, N. (PI); Boskin, M. (PI); Brady, D. (PI); Bresnahan, T. (PI); Bulow, J. (PI); Canellos, C. (PI); Carroll, G. (PI); Chandrasekhar, A. (PI); Chaudhary, L. (PI); Chetty, R. (PI); Clerici-Arias, M. (PI); Cogan, J. (PI); David, P. (PI); DeGiorgi, G. (PI); Diamond, R. (PI); Dickstein, M. (PI); Donaldson, D. (PI); Duffie, D. (PI); Duggan, M. (PI); Dupas, P. (PI); Einav, L. (PI); Fafchamps, M. (PI); Falcon, W. (PI); Fearon, J. (PI); Fitzgerald, D. (PI); Fitzpatrick, M. (PI); Fong, K. (PI); Fuchs, V. (PI); Garber, A. (PI); Gentzkow, M. (PI); Goda, G. (PI); Gould, A. (PI); Goulder, L. (PI); Greif, A. (PI); Haber, S. (PI); Hall, R. (PI); Hammond, P. (PI); Hansen, P. (PI); Hanson, W. (PI); Hanushek, E. (PI); Harding, M. (PI); Harris, D. (PI); Hartmann, W. (PI); Henry, P. (PI); Hong, H. (PI); Hope, N. (PI); Hoxby, C. (PI); Imbens, G. (PI); Jackson, M. (PI); Jagolinzer, A. (PI); Jaimovich, N. (PI); Jarosch, G. (PI); Jayachandran, S. (PI); Jones, C. (PI); Judd, K. (PI); Kastl, J. (PI); Kehoe, P. (PI); Kessler, D. (PI); Klenow, P. (PI); Kochar, A. (PI); Kojima, F. (PI); Kolstad, C. (PI); Koudijs, P. (PI); Kuran, T. (PI); Kurlat, P. (PI); Kurz, M. (PI); Lambert, N. (PI); Larsen, B. (PI); Lau, L. (PI); Lazear, E. (PI); Levin, J. (PI); Loeb, S. (PI); MaCurdy, T. (PI); Mahajan, A. (PI); Manova, K. (PI); McClellan, M. (PI); McKinnon, R. (PI); Meier, G. (PI); Milgrom, P. (PI); Miller, G. (PI); Morten, M. (PI); Moser, P. (PI); Naylor, R. (PI); Niederle, M. (PI); Noll, R. (PI); Owen, B. (PI); Oyer, P. (PI); Pencavel, J. (PI); Persson, P. (PI); Piazzesi, M. (PI); Pistaferri, L. (PI); Polinsky, A. (PI); Qian, Y. (PI); Rangel, A. (PI); Reiss, P. (PI); Richards, J. (PI); Roberts, J. (PI); Romano, J. (PI); Romer, P. (PI); Rosenberg, N. (PI); Rosston, G. (PI); Roth, A. (PI); Rothwell, G. (PI); Rozelle, S. (PI); Scheuer, F. (PI); Schneider, M. (PI); Segal, I. (PI); Shotts, K. (PI); Shoven, J. (PI); Singleton, K. (PI); Skrzypacz, A. (PI); Sorkin, I. (PI); Sprenger, C. (PI); Staiger, R. (PI); Stanton, F. (PI); Sweeney, J. (PI); Taylor, J. (PI); Tendall, M. (PI); Tertilt, M. (PI); Wacziarg, R. (PI); Weingast, B. (PI); Wilson, R. (PI); Wolak, F. (PI); Wolitzky, A. (PI); Wright, G. (PI); Wright, M. (PI); Yotopoulos, P. (PI); Bergstrom, K. (TA); Ponce, S. (GP); Sheeler, P. (GP)

ECON 203: Microeconomics II

(Non-Economics graduate students register for 203N.) Non-cooperative game theory including normal and extensive forms, solution concepts, games with incomplete information, and repeated games. Externalities and public goods. The theory of imperfect competition: static Bertrand and Cournot competition, dynamic oligopoly, entry decisions, entry deterrence, strategic behavior to alter market conditions. Limited enrollment. Prerequisite: ECON 202.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Milgrom, P. (PI)

ECON 209: Economic, Legal, and Political Analysis of Climate-Change Policy (EARTHSYS 159, ECON 159, PUBLPOL 159)

This course will advance students understanding of economic, legal, and political approaches to avoiding or managing the problem of global climate change. Theoretical contributions as well as empirical analyses will be considered. It will address economic issues, legal constraints, and political challenges associated with various emissions-reduction strategies, and it will consider policy efforts at the local, national, and international levels. Specific topics include: interactions among overlapping climate policies, the strengths and weaknesses of alternative policy instruments, trade-offs among alternative policy objectives, and decision making under uncertainty. Prerequisites: Econ 50 or its equivalent.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ECON 211: Macroeconomics II

Dynamic stochastic general equilibrium models using dynamic programming methods that are solved with MATLAB. Growth models (neoclassical, human capital, technical change) using optimal control theory. Limited enrollment. Prerequisite: ECON 210.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ECON 215: Development Economics II

This is a course focusing on macro development research. It will cover dynamic models of growth and development, with a focus on migration; technological change; the functioning of financial markets; and barriers to agricultural productivity in less developed countries. Prerequisites: 202 or 202N, 270.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Morten, M. (PI)

ECON 220: Political Economy I (POLISCI 311E)

Theoretical models of political economy. Potential topics include: basic social choice theory, democracy, electoral competition, political accountability, legislative bargaining, lobbying, corruption, autocratic politics, democratization, conflict and arms races, and institutional change. Attention to economics implications, including taxation, redistribution, and public goods. Prerequisite: Econ 203 or permission of instructors.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Trebbi, F. (PI)

ECON 227: European Economic History

European Economic History: covers topics in European Economic History from the Middle Ages to the twentieth century (but does not cover detailed economic history of particular European countries). Topics include competing hypotheses in explaining long term trends in economic growth and cross-country differences in long-term economic growth; the diffusion of knowledge; the formation, function, and persistence of institutions and organizations; the role of institutions and organizations (for example, apprenticeship, servitude, partnerships, cooperatives, social networks, share cropping, and communes) as solutions to contractual problems; the causes and consequences of income inequality; the economics of migration; the changing economic role of the family. The course will highlight the use of economic theory in guiding hypothesis testing, as well as the construction of new datasets and the execution of empirical analysis. Enrollment limited to graduate students.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Abramitzky, R. (PI)

ECON 234: Advanced Macroeconomics II

Modern macroeconomics of aggregate fluctuations in advanced economies. Current research on sovereign debt, fiscal policy and financial flows, low growth and stagnation, low interest rates, financial crises, unemployment fluctuations, and other timely topics. The course will be organized around the detailed study of recent research papers. Some lectures will be given by visiting macroeconomists. Students enrolled in MGTECON612 take the class for 4 units. Students develop a research proposal and present it to the instructors as the final exam. Prerequisite: Satisfaction of the economics department¿s core macro requirement or consent of the instructors.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ECON 237: Financial Economics II (MGTECON 617)

This Ph.D. course will cover research topics at the boundary between macroeconomics and finance. Topics will include the study of macroeconomic models with financial frictions, the term structure of interest rates, conventional and unconventional monetary policy, sovereign debt crises, search frictions and segmentation in housing markets, (over)leveraging by households, heterogeneous expectations, excess volatility, financial bubbles and crises. Student presentations and course paper requirement. Designed for second year PhD students in economics or finance.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ECON 239D: Directed Reading

May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Abramitzky, R. (PI); Admati, A. (PI); Amador, M. (PI); Amemiya, T. (PI); Aoki, M. (PI); Arora, A. (PI); Athey, S. (PI); Attanasio, O. (PI); Auclert, A. (PI); Bagwell, K. (PI); Baron, D. (PI); Bekaert, G. (PI); Bernheim, B. (PI); Bhattacharya, J. (PI); Bloom, N. (PI); Boskin, M. (PI); Brady, D. (PI); Bresnahan, T. (PI); Bulow, J. (PI); Canellos, C. (PI); Carroll, G. (PI); Chandrasekhar, A. (PI); Chaudhary, L. (PI); Chetty, R. (PI); Clerici-Arias, M. (PI); Cogan, J. (PI); David, P. (PI); DeGiorgi, G. (PI); Diamond, R. (PI); Dickstein, M. (PI); Donaldson, D. (PI); Duffie, D. (PI); Duggan, M. (PI); Dupas, P. (PI); Einav, L. (PI); Fafchamps, M. (PI); Falcon, W. (PI); Fitzgerald, D. (PI); Fitzpatrick, M. (PI); Fong, K. (PI); Fuchs, V. (PI); Garber, A. (PI); Gentzkow, M. (PI); Goda, G. (PI); Gould, A. (PI); Goulder, L. (PI); Greif, A. (PI); Haak, D. (PI); Haber, S. (PI); Hall, R. (PI); Hammond, P. (PI); Hansen, P. (PI); Hanson, W. (PI); Hanushek, E. (PI); Harding, M. (PI); Harris, D. (PI); Hartmann, W. (PI); Henry, P. (PI); Hickman, B. (PI); Hong, H. (PI); Hope, N. (PI); Horvath, M. (PI); Hoxby, C. (PI); Imbens, G. (PI); Jackson, M. (PI); Jagolinzer, A. (PI); Jaimovich, N. (PI); Jarosch, G. (PI); Jayachandran, S. (PI); Jones, C. (PI); Jost, J. (PI); Judd, K. (PI); Kastl, J. (PI); Kehoe, P. (PI); Kessler, D. (PI); Klenow, P. (PI); Kochar, A. (PI); Kojima, F. (PI); Kolstad, C. (PI); Koudijs, P. (PI); Kreps, D. (PI); Kuran, T. (PI); Kurlat, P. (PI); Kurz, M. (PI); Lambert, N. (PI); Larsen, B. (PI); Lau, L. (PI); Lazear, E. (PI); Levin, J. (PI); MaCurdy, T. (PI); Mahajan, A. (PI); Malmendier, U. (PI); Manova, K. (PI); McClellan, M. (PI); McKinnon, R. (PI); Meier, G. (PI); Milgrom, P. (PI); Miller, G. (PI); Morten, M. (PI); Moser, P. (PI); Naylor, R. (PI); Nechyba, T. (PI); Niederle, M. (PI); Noll, R. (PI); Owen, B. (PI); Oyer, P. (PI); Pencavel, J. (PI); Perez-Gonzalez, F. (PI); Persson, P. (PI); Pfleiderer, P. (PI); Piazzesi, M. (PI); Pistaferri, L. (PI); Polinsky, A. (PI); Qian, Y. (PI); Rangel, A. (PI); Reiss, P. (PI); Richards, J. (PI); Roberts, J. (PI); Romano, J. (PI); Romer, P. (PI); Rosenberg, N. (PI); Rossi-Hansberg, E. (PI); Rosston, G. (PI); Roth, A. (PI); Rothwell, G. (PI); Royalty, A. (PI); Rozelle, S. (PI); Sargent, T. (PI); Schaffner, J. (PI); Scheuer, F. (PI); Schneider, M. (PI); Segal, I. (PI); Sharpe, W. (PI); Shotts, K. (PI); Shoven, J. (PI); Singleton, K. (PI); Skrzypacz, A. (PI); Sorkin, I. (PI); Sprenger, C. (PI); Staiger, R. (PI); Stanton, F. (PI); Sweeney, J. (PI); Taylor, J. (PI); Tendall, M. (PI); Tertilt, M. (PI); Topper, M. (PI); Vytlacil, E. (PI); Wacziarg, R. (PI); Weingast, B. (PI); Wilson, R. (PI); Wolak, F. (PI); Wolitzky, A. (PI); Wright, G. (PI); Wright, M. (PI); Yotopoulos, P. (PI); Ponce, S. (GP); Sheeler, P. (GP)

ECON 242: Public Economics II

We analyze how workers and incomes respond to taxation and anti-poverty programs. We learn how to use taxes and economic mechanisms to address externalities (pollution, social "bads" and "goods"). We learn fundamental tax reform, public goods, fiscal federalism, local public goods, and (special emphasis) government's role in education. Prerequisites: 202, 203, 204, 210, 270, 271, or similar with consent of instructor. Recommended: 241.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Hoxby, C. (PI)

ECON 247: Labor Economics II

Recent topics in applied micro, focusing on papers from top journals (QJE, AER, JPE, Econometrica and REStud) over the last ten years. Broad overview of current topic and techniques in applied-micro research. Topics include inequality, polarization and skill-biased technical change, discrimination, technology adoption and the spread of information, management practices, field experiments, peer effects and academic spillovers. Combination of student and faculty presentations. Additional sessions on general presentations, paper writing and research skills to prepare for job market. Typically also run a class trip to the NBER West-Coast labor meetings at the San Francisco Fed.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Bloom, N. (PI)

ECON 251: Natural Resource and Energy Economics

Economic theory and empirical analysis of non-renewable and renewable natural resources, with considerable attention to energy provision and use. Topics include: exhaustible resources; renewable resources; and energy industry market structure, pricing, and performance. Prerequisites: 202, 203, 204, 271, and 272, or equivalents with consent of instructor.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ECON 252: The Future of Finance (ECON 152, PUBLPOL 364, STATS 238)

(Same as Law 1038) If you are interested in a career in finance or that touches finance (computational science, economics, public policy, legal, regulatory, corporate, other), this course will give you a useful perspective. We will take on hot topics in the current landscape of global financial markets such as how the world has evolved post-financial crisis, how it is being disrupted by FinTech, RegTech, artificial intelligence, crowd financing, blockchain, machine learning & robotics (to name a few), how it is being challenged by IoT, cyber, financial warfare & crypto currency risks (to name a few) and how it is seizing new opportunities in fast-growing areas such as ETFs, new instruments/payment platforms, robo advising, big data & algorithmic trading (to name a few). The course will include guest-lecturer perspectives on how sweeping changes are transforming business models and where the greatest opportunities exist for students entering or touching the world of finance today including existing, new and disruptive players. While derivatives and other quantitative concepts will be handled in a non-technical way, some knowledge of finance and the capital markets is presumed. Elements used in grading: Class Participation, Attendance, Final Paper. Consent Application: To apply for this course, students must complete and email to the instructors the Consent Application Form, which is available on the Public Policy Program's website at https://publicpolicy.stanford.edu/academics/undergraduate/forms. See Consent Application Form for submission deadline.
Terms: Win | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Beder, T. (PI)

ECON 258: Industrial Organization IIA

Topics may include theoretical and empirical analysis of auctions, bargaining, price discrimination, advertising, brands, and markets for information, and research at the boundaries between IO and neighboring fields such as development, macro, trade, and behavioral economics.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ECON 271: Intermediate Econometrics II

Linear regression model, relaxation of classical-regression assumptions, simultaneous equation models, linear time series analysis, nonlinear estimation. Limited enrollment. Prerequisite: 270.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ECON 276: Computational Econometrics

Theory and computational methods necessary to implement state-of-the-art econometric methods used in theory-based empirical work. Topics covered include: computation of nonlinear M-estimators subject to equality and inequality constraints, simulation estimators, indirect inference, Markov Chain Monte Carlo methods, resampling (bootstrap and sub-sampling) methods for estimation and inference, dynamic discrete choice models, continuous and discrete mixture models and estimation and inference for partially identified models.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Hong, H. (PI); Wolak, F. (PI)

ECON 279: Behavioral and Experimental Economics II

This is part of a three course sequence (along with Econ 277 & 278) on behavioral and experimental economics. The sequence has two main objectives: 1) examines theories and evidence related to the psychology of economic decision making, 2) Introduces methods of experimental economics, and explores major subject areas (including those not falling within behavioral economics) that have been addressed through laboratory experiments. Focuses on series of experiments that build on one another in an effort to test between competing theoretical frameworks, with the objects of improving the explanatory and predictive performance of standard models, and of providing a foundation for more reliable normative analyses of policy issues. Prerequisites: 204 and 271, or consent of instructor.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ECON 282: Contracts, Information, and Incentives

Basic theories and recent developments in mechanism design and the theory of contracts. Topics include: hidden characteristics and hidden action models with one and many agents, design of mechanisms and markets with limited communication, long-term relationships under commitment and under renegotiation, property rights and theories of the firm.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Segal, I. (PI)

ECON 289: Advanced Topics in Game Theory and Information Economics

Topics course covering a variety of game theory topics with emphasis on market design, such as matching theory and auction theory. Final paper required. Prerequisites: ECON 285 or equivalent. ECON 283 recommended.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Kojima, F. (PI)

ECON 299: Practical Training

Students obtain employment in a relevant research or industrial activity to enhance their professional experience consistent with their degree programs. At the start of the quarter, students must submit a one page statement showing the relevance of the employment to the degree program along with an offer letter. At the end of the quarter, a three page final report must be supplied documenting work done and relevance to degree program. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Abramitzky, R. (PI); Admati, A. (PI); Amador, M. (PI); Amemiya, T. (PI); Aoki, M. (PI); Arora, A. (PI); Athey, S. (PI); Attanasio, O. (PI); Auclert, A. (PI); Bagwell, K. (PI); Baron, D. (PI); Bekaert, G. (PI); Bernheim, B. (PI); Bettinger, E. (PI); Bhattacharya, J. (PI); Blimpo, M. (PI); Bloom, N. (PI); Boskin, M. (PI); Brady, D. (PI); Bresnahan, T. (PI); Bulow, J. (PI); Canellos, C. (PI); Carroll, G. (PI); Chandrasekhar, A. (PI); Chaudhary, L. (PI); Chetty, R. (PI); Clerici-Arias, M. (PI); Cogan, J. (PI); Cojoc, D. (PI); David, P. (PI); DeGiorgi, G. (PI); Dickstein, M. (PI); Donaldson, D. (PI); Duffie, D. (PI); Duggan, M. (PI); Dupas, P. (PI); Einav, L. (PI); Fafchamps, M. (PI); Falcon, W. (PI); Fitzgerald, D. (PI); Fitzpatrick, M. (PI); Fong, K. (PI); Fuchs, V. (PI); Garber, A. (PI); Gentzkow, M. (PI); Gould, A. (PI); Goulder, L. (PI); Greif, A. (PI); Haak, D. (PI); Haber, S. (PI); Hall, R. (PI); Hammond, P. (PI); Hansen, P. (PI); Hanson, W. (PI); Hanushek, E. (PI); Harding, M. (PI); Harris, D. (PI); Hartmann, W. (PI); Henry, P. (PI); Hickman, B. (PI); Hong, H. (PI); Hope, N. (PI); Horvath, M. (PI); Hoxby, C. (PI); Imbens, G. (PI); Jackson, M. (PI); Jagolinzer, A. (PI); Jaimovich, N. (PI); Jarosch, G. (PI); Jayachandran, S. (PI); Jones, C. (PI); Jost, J. (PI); Judd, K. (PI); Kastl, J. (PI); Kehoe, P. (PI); Kessler, D. (PI); Klenow, P. (PI); Kochar, A. (PI); Kojima, F. (PI); Kolstad, C. (PI); Krueger, A. (PI); Kuran, T. (PI); Kurlat, P. (PI); Kurz, M. (PI); Lambert, N. (PI); Larsen, B. (PI); Lau, L. (PI); Lazear, E. (PI); Levin, J. (PI); MaCurdy, T. (PI); Mahajan, A. (PI); Malmendier, U. (PI); Manova, K. (PI); McClellan, M. (PI); McKeon, S. (PI); McKinnon, R. (PI); Meier, G. (PI); Milgrom, P. (PI); Miller, G. (PI); Morten, M. (PI); Moser, P. (PI); Naylor, R. (PI); Nechyba, T. (PI); Niederle, M. (PI); Noll, R. (PI); Owen, B. (PI); Oyer, P. (PI); Pencavel, J. (PI); Persson, P. (PI); Piazzesi, M. (PI); Pistaferri, L. (PI); Polinsky, A. (PI); Qian, Y. (PI); Rangel, A. (PI); Reiss, P. (PI); Richards, J. (PI); Roberts, J. (PI); Romano, J. (PI); Romer, P. (PI); Rosenberg, N. (PI); Rossi-Hansberg, E. (PI); Rosston, G. (PI); Roth, A. (PI); Rothwell, G. (PI); Royalty, A. (PI); Rozelle, S. (PI); Sargent, T. (PI); Schaffner, J. (PI); Scheuer, F. (PI); Schneider, M. (PI); Segal, I. (PI); Sharpe, W. (PI); Shotts, K. (PI); Shoven, J. (PI); Singleton, K. (PI); Skrzypacz, A. (PI); Sorkin, I. (PI); Sprenger, C. (PI); Staiger, R. (PI); Stanton, F. (PI); Sweeney, J. (PI); Taylor, J. (PI); Tendall, M. (PI); Tertilt, M. (PI); Topper, M. (PI); Vytlacil, E. (PI); Wacziarg, R. (PI); Weingast, B. (PI); Wilson, R. (PI); Wolak, F. (PI); Wolitzky, A. (PI); Wright, G. (PI); Wright, M. (PI); Yotopoulos, P. (PI); Ponce, S. (GP); Sheeler, P. (GP)

ECON 310: Macroeconomic Workshop

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

ECON 315: Development Workshop

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

ECON 325: Economic History Workshop

May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

ECON 335: Experimental/Behavioral Seminar

Field seminar in experimental and behavioral economics.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

ECON 341: Public Economics and Environmental Economics Seminar

Issues in measuring and evaluating the economic performance of government tax, expenditure, debt, and regulatory policies; their effects on levels and distribution of income, wealth, and environmental quality; alternative policies and methods of evaluation. Workshop format combines student research, faculty presentations, and guest speakers. Prerequisite: ECON 241 or consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

ECON 345: Labor Economics Seminar

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

ECON 354: Law and Economics Seminar

This seminar will examine current research by lawyers and economists on a variety of topics in law and economics. Several sessions of the seminar will consist of an invited speaker, usually from another university, who will discuss his or her current research. Representative of these sessions have been discussions of compensation for government regulations and takings, liability rules for controlling accidents, the definition of markets in antitrust analysis, the role of the government as a controlling shareholder, and optimal drug patent length. Cross-listed with LAW 344.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 2-6 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

ECON 355: Industrial Organization Workshop

Current research in the field by visitors, presentations by students, and discussion of recent papers. Students write an original research paper, make a formal presentation, and lead a structured discussion.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

ECON 365: International Trade Workshop

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

ECON 370: Econometrics Workshop

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

ECON 391: Microeconomic Theory Seminar

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

ECON 801: TGR Project

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 0 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: TGR
Instructors: ; Abramitzky, R. (PI); Admati, A. (PI); Amador, M. (PI); Amemiya, T. (PI); Aoki, M. (PI); Arora, A. (PI); Athey, S. (PI); Attanasio, O. (PI); Bagwell, K. (PI); Baron, D. (PI); Bekaert, G. (PI); Bernheim, B. (PI); Bhattacharya, J. (PI); Bloom, N. (PI); Boskin, M. (PI); Brady, D. (PI); Bresnahan, T. (PI); Bulow, J. (PI); Canellos, C. (PI); Carroll, G. (PI); Chandrasekhar, A. (PI); Clerici-Arias, M. (PI); Cojoc, D. (PI); David, P. (PI); DeGiorgi, G. (PI); Dickstein, M. (PI); Duffie, D. (PI); Dupas, P. (PI); Einav, L. (PI); Fafchamps, M. (PI); Falcon, W. (PI); Fitzgerald, D. (PI); Fitzpatrick, M. (PI); Fong, K. (PI); Fuchs, V. (PI); Garber, A. (PI); Gould, A. (PI); Goulder, L. (PI); Greif, A. (PI); Haak, D. (PI); Haber, S. (PI); Hall, R. (PI); Hammond, P. (PI); Hansen, P. (PI); Hanson, W. (PI); Hanushek, E. (PI); Harding, M. (PI); Harris, D. (PI); Hartmann, W. (PI); Henry, P. (PI); Hickman, B. (PI); Hong, H. (PI); Hope, N. (PI); Horvath, M. (PI); Hoxby, C. (PI); Jackson, M. (PI); Jagolinzer, A. (PI); Jaimovich, N. (PI); Jayachandran, S. (PI); Jones, C. (PI); Jost, J. (PI); Judd, K. (PI); Kastl, J. (PI); Kessler, D. (PI); Klenow, P. (PI); Kochar, A. (PI); Kojima, F. (PI); Kolstad, C. (PI); Koudijs, P. (PI); Krueger, A. (PI); Kuran, T. (PI); Kurlat, P. (PI); Kurz, M. (PI); Lambert, N. (PI); Lau, L. (PI); Lazear, E. (PI); Levin, J. (PI); MaCurdy, T. (PI); Mahajan, A. (PI); Malmendier, U. (PI); Manova, K. (PI); McClellan, M. (PI); McKinnon, R. (PI); Meier, G. (PI); Milgrom, P. (PI); Miller, G. (PI); Moser, P. (PI); Naylor, R. (PI); Nechyba, T. (PI); Niederle, M. (PI); Noll, R. (PI); Owen, B. (PI); Oyer, P. (PI); Pencavel, J. (PI); Piazzesi, M. (PI); Pistaferri, L. (PI); Polinsky, A. (PI); Qian, Y. (PI); Rangel, A. (PI); Reiss, P. (PI); Richards, J. (PI); Roberts, J. (PI); Romano, J. (PI); Romer, P. (PI); Rosenberg, N. (PI); Rossi-Hansberg, E. (PI); Rosston, G. (PI); Roth, A. (PI); Rothwell, G. (PI); Royalty, A. (PI); Rozelle, S. (PI); Sargent, T. (PI); Schaffner, J. (PI); Scheuer, F. (PI); Schneider, M. (PI); Segal, I. (PI); Sharpe, W. (PI); Shotts, K. (PI); Shoven, J. (PI); Singleton, K. (PI); Skrzypacz, A. (PI); Sprenger, C. (PI); Staiger, R. (PI); Stanton, F. (PI); Sweeney, J. (PI); Taylor, J. (PI); Tendall, M. (PI); Tertilt, M. (PI); Topper, M. (PI); Vytlacil, E. (PI); Wacziarg, R. (PI); Weingast, B. (PI); Wilson, R. (PI); Wolak, F. (PI); Wolitzky, A. (PI); Wright, G. (PI); Wright, M. (PI); Yotopoulos, P. (PI); Ponce, S. (GP); Sheeler, P. (GP)

ECON 802: TGR Dissertation

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 0 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: TGR
Instructors: ; Abramitzky, R. (PI); Admati, A. (PI); Amador, M. (PI); Amemiya, T. (PI); Aoki, M. (PI); Arora, A. (PI); Athey, S. (PI); Attanasio, O. (PI); Auclert, A. (PI); Bagwell, K. (PI); Baron, D. (PI); Bekaert, G. (PI); Bernheim, B. (PI); Bhattacharya, J. (PI); Bloom, N. (PI); Boskin, M. (PI); Brady, D. (PI); Bresnahan, T. (PI); Bulow, J. (PI); Canellos, C. (PI); Carroll, G. (PI); Chandrasekhar, A. (PI); Chaudhary, L. (PI); Chetty, R. (PI); Clerici-Arias, M. (PI); Cogan, J. (PI); Cojoc, D. (PI); David, P. (PI); DeGiorgi, G. (PI); Dickstein, M. (PI); Donaldson, D. (PI); Duffie, D. (PI); Duggan, M. (PI); Dupas, P. (PI); Einav, L. (PI); Fafchamps, M. (PI); Falcon, W. (PI); Fitzgerald, D. (PI); Fitzpatrick, M. (PI); Fong, K. (PI); Fuchs, V. (PI); Garber, A. (PI); Gentzkow, M. (PI); Gould, A. (PI); Goulder, L. (PI); Greif, A. (PI); Haak, D. (PI); Haber, S. (PI); Hall, R. (PI); Hammond, P. (PI); Hansen, P. (PI); Hanson, W. (PI); Hanushek, E. (PI); Harding, M. (PI); Harris, D. (PI); Hartmann, W. (PI); Henry, P. (PI); Hickman, B. (PI); Hong, H. (PI); Hope, N. (PI); Horvath, M. (PI); Hoxby, C. (PI); Imbens, G. (PI); Jackson, M. (PI); Jagolinzer, A. (PI); Jaimovich, N. (PI); Jarosch, G. (PI); Jayachandran, S. (PI); Jones, C. (PI); Jost, J. (PI); Judd, K. (PI); Kastl, J. (PI); Kehoe, P. (PI); Kessler, D. (PI); Klenow, P. (PI); Kochar, A. (PI); Kojima, F. (PI); Kolstad, C. (PI); Koudijs, P. (PI); Kreps, D. (PI); Krueger, A. (PI); Kuran, T. (PI); Kurlat, P. (PI); Kurz, M. (PI); Lambert, N. (PI); Larsen, B. (PI); Lau, L. (PI); Lazear, E. (PI); Levin, J. (PI); MaCurdy, T. (PI); Mahajan, A. (PI); Malmendier, U. (PI); Manova, K. (PI); McClellan, M. (PI); McKinnon, R. (PI); Meier, G. (PI); Milgrom, P. (PI); Miller, G. (PI); Morten, M. (PI); Moser, P. (PI); Naylor, R. (PI); Niederle, M. (PI); Noll, R. (PI); Owen, B. (PI); Oyer, P. (PI); Pencavel, J. (PI); Persson, P. (PI); Piazzesi, M. (PI); Pistaferri, L. (PI); Polinsky, A. (PI); Qian, Y. (PI); Reiss, P. (PI); Richards, J. (PI); Roberts, J. (PI); Romano, J. (PI); Romer, P. (PI); Rosenberg, N. (PI); Rossi-Hansberg, E. (PI); Rosston, G. (PI); Roth, A. (PI); Rothwell, G. (PI); Royalty, A. (PI); Rozelle, S. (PI); Sargent, T. (PI); Schaffner, J. (PI); Scheuer, F. (PI); Schneider, M. (PI); Segal, I. (PI); Sharpe, W. (PI); Shotts, K. (PI); Shoven, J. (PI); Singleton, K. (PI); Skrzypacz, A. (PI); Sorkin, I. (PI); Sprenger, C. (PI); Staiger, R. (PI); Stanton, F. (PI); Sweeney, J. (PI); Taylor, J. (PI); Tendall, M. (PI); Tertilt, M. (PI); Topper, M. (PI); Wacziarg, R. (PI); Weingast, B. (PI); Wilson, R. (PI); Wolak, F. (PI); Wolitzky, A. (PI); Wright, G. (PI); Wright, M. (PI); Yotopoulos, P. (PI); Ponce, S. (GP); Sheeler, P. (GP)
© Stanford University | Terms of Use | Copyright Complaints