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ANTHRO 6: Human Origins (ANTHRO 206, HUMBIO 6)

The human fossil record from the first non-human primates in the late Cretaceous or early Paleocene, 80-65 million years ago, to the anatomically modern people in the late Pleistocene, between 100,000 to 50,000 B.C.E. Emphasis is on broad evolutionary trends and the natural selective forces behind them.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ANTHRO 14: Introduction to Anthropological Genetics

For upper division undergraduates. The extent and pattern of variation among human genomes, the origin of these patterns in human evolution, and the social and medical impact of recent discoveries. Topics include: the Human Genome Project; human origins; ancient DNA; genetic, behavioral, linguistic, cultural, and racial diversity; the role of disease in shaping genetic diversity; DNA forensics; genes and reproductive technology.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ANTHRO 171: The Biology and Evolution of Language (ANTHRO 271, HUMBIO 145L)

Lecture course surveying the biology, linguistic functions, and evolution of the organs of speech and speech centers in the brain, language in animals and humans, the evolution of language itself, and the roles of innateness vs. culture in language. Suitable both for general education and as preparation for further studies in anthropology, biology, linguistics, medicine, psychology, and speech & language therapy. Anthropology concentration: CS, EE. No prerequisites.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ANTHRO 175: Human Skeletal Anatomy (ANTHRO 275, BIO 174, BIO 274, HUMBIO 180)

Study of the human skeleton (a. k. a. human osteology), as it bears on other disciplines, including medicine, forensics, archaeology, and paleoanthropology (human evolution). Basic bone biology, anatomy, and development, emphasizing hands-on examination and identification of human skeletal parts, their implications for determining an individual¿s age, sex, geographic origin, and health status, and for the evolutionary history of our species. Three hours of lecture and at least three hours of supervised and independent study in the lab each week.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Klein, R. (PI)

BIO 3N: Views of a Changing Sea: Literature & Science

The state of a changing world ocean, particularly in the eastern Pacific, will be examined through historical and contemporary fiction, non-fiction and scientific publications. Issues will include harvest and mariculture fisheries, land-sea interactions and oceanic climate change in both surface and deep waters.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Gilly, W. (PI)

BIO 4N: Peopleomics: The science and ethics of personalized genomic medicine

Exploration of the new field of personalized genomic medicine. Personalized medicine is based on the idea that each person's unique genome sequence can be used to predict risk of acquiring specific diseases, and to make more informed medical choices. The science behind these approaches; where they are heading in the future; and the ethical implications such technology presents. Lectures augmented with hands-on experience in exploring and analyzing a real person's genome.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

BIO 7S: Introduction to Biology

Introduction to several major fields of biology, including biochemistry, cell biology, genetics, evolution, and biodiversity. Introduces the general approaches used by scientists to study life and explores recent advances in each area during weekly discussion section. Not intended for biology majors, but provides the foundation for higher-level biology courses. Prerequisite: high school biology.
Terms: Sum | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Schwartz, E. (PI)

BIO 8N: Human Origins

A survey of the anatomical and behavioral evidence for human evolution and of the increasingly important information from molecular genetics. Emphasis on the split between the human and chimpanzee lines 6-7 million years ago, the appearance of the australopiths by 4.1 million years ago, the emergence of the genus Homo about 2.5 million years ago, the spread of Homo from Africa 1.7-1.6 million years ago, the subsequent divergence of Homo into different species on different continents, and the expansion of fully modern humans (Homo sapiens) from Africa about 50,000 years ago to replace the Neanderthals and other non-modern Eurasians.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Klein, R. (PI)

BIO 25Q: Cystic fibrosis: from medical conundrum to precision medicine success story

Preference to sophomores. The class will explore cystic fibrosis (CF), the most prevalent fatal genetic disease in the US, as a scientific and medical whodunit. Through reading and discussion of medical and scientific literature, we will tackle questions that include: how was life expectancy with CF increased from weeks to decades without understanding the disease mechanism? Why is the disease so prevalent? Is there an advantage to being a carrier? Is CF a single disease or a continuum of physiological variation ¿or- what is a disease? How did research into CF lead to discovery of the underlying cause of most other genetic diseases as well?nnThrough critical reading of the scientific and medical literature, class discussion, field trips and meetings with genetic counselors, caregivers, patients, physicians and researchers, we will work to build a deep understanding of this disease, from the biochemical basis to the current controversies over pathogenic mechanisms, treatment strategies and the ethics and economics of genetic testing and astronomical drug costs.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Kopito, R. (PI)

BIO 30: Ecology for Everyone

Everything is connected, but how? Ecology is the science of interactions and the changes they generate. This project-based course links individual behavior, population growth, species interactions, and ecosystem function. Introduction to measurement, observation, experimental design and hypothesis testing in field projects, mostly done in groups. The goal is to learn to think analytically about everyday ecological processes involving bacteria, fungi, plants, animals and humans. The course uses basic statistics to analyze data; there are no math prerequisites except arithmetic. Open to everyone, including those who may be headed for more advanced courses in ecology and environmental science.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Gordon, D. (PI)

BIO 32Q: Neuroethology: The Neural Control of Behavior (HUMBIO 91Q)

Preference to sophomores. Animal behavior offers insights about evolutionary adaptations and this seminar will discuss the origins of the study of animal behavior and its development to the present. How does the nervous system control behavior and how is it changed by behavior? We will analyze and discuss original research papers about the neural basis of behavior. The use and misuse of parallels between animal and human behavior. Possible field trip to observe animals in their natural habitat.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Fernald, R. (PI)

BIO 33N: Conservation Science and Practice

Preference to freshmen. This course will explore the potential for harmonizing people and nature, for achieving improved outcomes in the well-being of both as a result of conservation investments and interventions. We will consider biophysical, economic, social, and psychological perspectives, examining an array of conservation goals, from protecting endangered species to securing ecosystem services (such as flood control and climate stability) to alleviating poverty and improving mental well-being. We will also study the design and implementation of real conservation and human development efforts worldwide, among the many farmers, ranchers, fishing people, and others managing Earth's lands and waters. Highlights include a field trip to Jasper Ridge Biological Preserve, Stanford¿s very own nature reserve, and guest visits of some impressive conservation leaders internationally.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

BIO 34N: Hunger

The biology of hunger and satiety, disease states that disrupt normal responses to hunger and satiety, starvation responses and adaptations to starvation in a variety of organisms, food production and distribution mechanisms, historic famines and their causes, the challenges of providing adequate food and energy for the Earth's growing population, local and global efforts to alleviate hunger, and hunger in fiction.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

BIO 104: Advanced Molecular Biology (BIO 200)

Molecular mechanisms that govern the replication, recombination, and expression of eukaryotic genomes. Topics: DNA replication, DNA recombination, gene transcription, RNA splicing, regulation of gene expression, protein synthesis, and protein folding. Satisfies Central Menu Area 1. Prerequisite: Biology core.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

BIO 109A: The Human Genome and Disease (BIOC 109A, BIOC 209A, HUMBIO 158)

The variability of the human genome and the role of genomic information in research, drug discovery, and human health. Concepts and interpretations of genomic markers in medical research and real life applications. Human genomes in diverse populations. Original contributions from thought leaders in academia and industry and interaction between students and guest lecturers. Students with a major, minor or coterm in Biology: 109A/209A or 109B/209B may count toward degree program but not both.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

BIO 109B: The Human Genome and Disease: Genetic Diversity and Personalized Medicine (BIOC 109B)

Continuation of 109A/209A. Genetic drift: the path of human predecessors out of Africa to Europe and then either through Asia to Australia or through northern Russia to Alaska down to the W. Coast of the Americas. Support for this idea through the histocompatibility genes and genetic sequences that predispose people to diseases. Guest lectures from academia and pharmaceutical companies. Prerequisite: Biology or Human Biology core. Students with a major, minor or coterm in Biology: 109A/209A or 109B/209B may count toward degree program but not both.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

BIO 110: Chromatin Regulation of the Genome (BIO 210)

Maintenance of the genome is a prerequisite for life. In eukaryotes, all DNA-templated processes are tightly connected to chromatin structure and function. This course will explore epigenetic and chromatin regulation of cellular processes related to aging, cancer, stem cell pluripotency, metabolic homeostasis, and development. Course material integrates current literature with a foundational review of histone modifications and nucleosome composition in epigenetic inheritance, transcription, replication, cell division and DNA damage responses. Prerequisite: BIO 41 or consent of instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Morrison, A. (PI)

BIO 112: Human Physiology (HUMBIO 133)

Human physiology will be examined by organ systems: cardiovascular, respiratory, renal, gastrointestinal and endocrine. Molecular and cell biology and signaling principles that underlie organ development, pathophysiology and opportunities for regenerative medicine are discussed, as well as integrative control mechanisms and fetal development. Prerequisite: Human Biology core, Biology core, or equivalent, or consent of instructor.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Kao, P. (PI)

BIO 113: Fundamentals of Molecular Evolution (BIO 244)

The inference of key molecular evolutionary processes from DNA and protein sequences. Topics include random genetic drift, coalescent models, effects and tests of natural selection, combined effects of linkage and natural selection, codon bias and genome evolution. Satisfies Central Menu Areas 1 or 4. Prerequisites: Biology core or graduate standing in any department, and consent of instructor.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

BIO 116: Ecology of the Hawaiian Islands (EARTHSYS 116)

Terrestrial and marine ecology and conservation biology of the Hawaiian Archipelago. Taught in the field in Hawaii as part of quarter-long sequence of courses including Earth Sciences and Anthropology. Topics include ecological succession, plant-soil interactions, conservation biology, biological invasions and ecosystem consequences, and coral reef ecology. Restricted to students accepted into the Earth Systems of Hawaii Program.
Terms: alternate years, given next year | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

BIO 117: Biology and Global Change (EARTHSYS 111, ESS 111)

The biological causes and consequences of anthropogenic and natural changes in the atmosphere, oceans, and terrestrial and freshwater ecosystems. Topics: glacial cycles and marine circulation, greenhouse gases and climate change, tropical deforestation and species extinctions, and human population growth and resource use. Prerequisite: Biology or Human Biology core or graduate standing.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Arrigo, K. (PI)

BIO 118: Genetic Analysis of Biological Processes

Focus is on using mutations and genetic analysis to study biological and medical questions. The first portion of the course covers how the identification and analysis of mutations can be used in model systems to investigate biological processes such as development and metabolism. In the second portion of the course, we focus on the use of existing genetic variation in humans and other species to identify disease-associated genes as well as to investigate variation in morphological traits such as body size and shape. This course will be offered for a final time in Winter 2017-18 and then discontinued. Students who have taken BIO 82 may not enroll in BIO 118.
Terms: Win, offered once only | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Simon, M. (PI)

BIO 119: Evolution of Marine Ecosystems (EARTHSYS 122, GS 123, GS 223B)

Life originally evolved in the ocean. When, why, and how did the major transitions occur in the history of marine life? What triggered the rapid evolution and diversification of animals in the Cambrian, after more than 3.5 billion years of Earth's history? What caused Earth's major mass extinction events? How do ancient extinction events compare to current threats to marine ecosystems? How has the evolution of primary producers impacted animals, and how has animal evolution impacted primary producers? In this course, we will review the latest evidence regarding these major questions in the history of marine ecosystems. We will develop familiarity with the most common groups of marine animal fossils. We will also conduct original analyses of paleontological data, developing skills both in the framing and testing of scientific hypotheses and in data analysis and presentation.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Heim, N. (PI); Payne, J. (PI)

BIO 132: Advanced Imaging Lab in Biophysics (APPPHYS 232, BIO 232, BIOPHYS 232, GENE 232)

Laboratory and lectures. Advanced microscopy and imaging, emphasizing hands-on experience with state-of-the-art techniques. Students construct and operate working apparatus. Topics include microscope optics, Koehler illumination, contrast-generating mechanisms (bright/dark field, fluorescence, phase contrast, differential interference contrast), and resolution limits. Laboratory topics vary by year, but include single-molecule fluorescence, fluorescence resonance energy transfer, confocal microscopy, two-photon microscopy, microendoscopy, and optical trapping. Limited enrollment. Recommended: basic physics, Biology core or equivalent, and consent of instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

BIO 137: Plant Genetics

Gene analysis, mutagenesis, transposable elements; developmental genetics of flowering and embryo development; biochemical genetics of plant metabolism; scientific and societal lessons from transgenic plants. Satisfies Central Menu Area 2. Prerequisite: Biology core or consent of instructor. Satisfies WIM in Biology.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

BIO 144: Conservation Biology: A Latin American Perspective (BIO 234, HUMBIO 112)

Principles and application of the science of preserving biological diversity. Conceptually, this course is designed to explore 4 major components relevant to the conservation of biodiversity, as exemplified by the Latin American region. The conceptual frameworks and principles, however, should be generally applicable, and provide insights for all regions of the world, including those of lesser biodiversity. Satisfies Central Menu Area 4 for Bio majors. Prerequisite: BIO 101, or BIO 43 or HUMBIO 2A with consent of instructor. Graduate level students will be expected to conduct a literature research exercise leading to a written paper, addressing a topic of their choosing, derived from any of the themes discussed in class.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

BIO 145: Ecology and Evolution of Animal Behavior (BIO 245)

Ecological and evolutionary perspectives on animal behavior, with an emphasis on social and collective behavior. This is a project-based course in a lecture/seminar format. Seminars will be based on discussion of journal articles. Independent research projects on the behavior of animals on campus. Prerequisites: Biology or Human Biology core, Biology/ES 30. Recommended: statistics.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Gordon, D. (PI)

BIO 149: The Neurobiology of Sleep (BIO 249, HUMBIO 161)

Preference to seniors and graduate students. The neurochemistry and neurophysiology of changes in brain activity and conscious awareness associated with changes in the sleep/wake state. Behavioral and neurobiological phenomena including sleep regulation, sleep homeostasis, circadian rhythms, sleep disorders, sleep function, and the molecular biology of sleep. Enrollment limited to 16.
Terms: alternate years, given next year | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

BIO 150: Human Behavioral Biology (HUMBIO 160)

Multidisciplinary. How to approach complex normal and abnormal behaviors through biology. How to integrate disciplines including sociobiology, ethology, neuroscience, and endocrinology to examine behaviors such as aggression, sexual behavior, language use, and mental illness.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Sapolsky, R. (PI)

BIO 151: Mechanisms of Neuron Death

For Biology majors with background in neuroscience. Cell and molecular biology of neuron death during neurological disease. Topics: the amyloid diseases (Alzheimer's), prion diseases (kuru and Creutzfeldt-Jakob), oxygen radical diseases (Parkinson's and ALS), triplet repeat diseases (Huntington's), and AIDS-related dementia. Student presentations. Enrollment limited to 15; application required.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Sapolsky, R. (PI)

BIO 152: Imaging: Biological Light Microscopy (CSB 222, MCP 222)

This intensive laboratory and discussion course will provide participants with the theoretical and practical knowledge to utilize emerging imaging technologies based on light microscopy. Topics include microscope optics, resolution limits, Köhler illumination, confocal microscopy, fluorescence, two-photon, TIRF, FRET, photobleaching, super-resolution (SIM, STED, STORM/PALM), and live-cell imaging. Applications include using fluorescent probes to analyze subcellular localization and live cell-translocation dynamics. We will be using a ¿flipped¿ classroom for the course in that students will watch iBiology lectures before class, and class time will be used for engaging in extensive discussion. Lab portion involves extensive in-class use of microscopes in the Stanford Cell Sciences Imaging Facility (CSIF) and Neuroscience Microscopy Core (NMS) microscopy facilities. nnMonday/Wednesday 1:30-2:50PM, Friday 1:30-4:30PM for 6 weeks (Apr. 2 - May 9), 3 units
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

BIO 153: Cellular Neuroscience: Cell Signaling and Behavior (PSYCH 120)

Neural interactions underlying behavior. Prerequisites: PSYCH 1 or basic biology.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Wine, J. (PI); Tong, L. (TA)

BIO 154: Molecular and Cellular Neurobiology

For advanced undergraduate students. Cellular and molecular mechanisms in the organization and functions of the nervous system. Topics: wiring of the neuronal circuit, synapse structure and synaptic transmission, signal transduction in the nervous system, sensory systems, molecular basis of behavior including learning and memory, molecular pathogenesis of neurological diseases. Satisfies Central Menu Areas 2 or 3 for Bio majors. Prerequisite for undergraduates: Biology core or equivalent, or consent of instructors.
Terms: alternate years, given next year | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

BIO 157: Biochemistry and Molecular Biology of Plants (BIO 257)

Biochemical and molecular basis of plant growth and adaptation. Topics include: hormone signal transduction; photoreceptor chemistry and signaling; metabolite sensing and transport; dynamics of photosynthesis; plant innate immunity and symbiosis. Lectures and readings will emphasize research methods. Prerequisite: Biology core or equivalent, or consent of instructor.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

BIO 158: Developmental Neurobiology (BIO 258)

For advanced undergraduates and coterminal students. The principles of nervous system development from the molecular control of patterning, cell-cell interactions, and trophic factors to the level of neural systems and the role of experience in influencing brain structure and function. Topics: neural induction and patterning cell lineage, neurogenesis, neuronal migration, axonal pathfinding, synapse elimination, the role of activity, critical periods, and the development of behavior. Satisfies Central Menu Areas 2 or 3. Prerequisite: BIO 42 or equivalent.
Terms: alternate years, given next year | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

BIO 171: Principles of Cell Cycle Control (BIO 271, CSB 271)

Genetic analysis of the key regulatory circuits governing the control of cell division. Illustration of key principles that can be generalized to other synthetic and natural biological circuits. Focus on tractable model organisms; growth control; irreversible biochemical switches; chromosome duplication; mitosis; DNA damage checkpoints; MAPK pathway-cell cycle interface; oncogenesis. Analysis of classic and current primary literature. Satisfies Central Menu Area 2.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

BIO 174: Human Skeletal Anatomy (ANTHRO 175, ANTHRO 275, BIO 274, HUMBIO 180)

Study of the human skeleton (a. k. a. human osteology), as it bears on other disciplines, including medicine, forensics, archaeology, and paleoanthropology (human evolution). Basic bone biology, anatomy, and development, emphasizing hands-on examination and identification of human skeletal parts, their implications for determining an individual¿s age, sex, geographic origin, and health status, and for the evolutionary history of our species. Three hours of lecture and at least three hours of supervised and independent study in the lab each week.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Klein, R. (PI)

BIO 271: Principles of Cell Cycle Control (BIO 171, CSB 271)

Genetic analysis of the key regulatory circuits governing the control of cell division. Illustration of key principles that can be generalized to other synthetic and natural biological circuits. Focus on tractable model organisms; growth control; irreversible biochemical switches; chromosome duplication; mitosis; DNA damage checkpoints; MAPK pathway-cell cycle interface; oncogenesis. Analysis of classic and current primary literature. Satisfies Central Menu Area 2.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

BIOC 109A: The Human Genome and Disease (BIO 109A, BIOC 209A, HUMBIO 158)

The variability of the human genome and the role of genomic information in research, drug discovery, and human health. Concepts and interpretations of genomic markers in medical research and real life applications. Human genomes in diverse populations. Original contributions from thought leaders in academia and industry and interaction between students and guest lecturers. Students with a major, minor or coterm in Biology: 109A/209A or 109B/209B may count toward degree program but not both.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

BIOC 109B: The Human Genome and Disease: Genetic Diversity and Personalized Medicine (BIO 109B)

Continuation of 109A/209A. Genetic drift: the path of human predecessors out of Africa to Europe and then either through Asia to Australia or through northern Russia to Alaska down to the W. Coast of the Americas. Support for this idea through the histocompatibility genes and genetic sequences that predispose people to diseases. Guest lectures from academia and pharmaceutical companies. Prerequisite: Biology or Human Biology core. Students with a major, minor or coterm in Biology: 109A/209A or 109B/209B may count toward degree program but not both.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

BIOE 122: Biosecurity and Bioterrorism Response (EMED 122, EMED 222, PUBLPOL 122, PUBLPOL 222)

Overview of the most pressing biosecurity issues facing the world today. Guest lecturers have included former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice, former Special Assistant on BioSecurity to Presidents Clinton and Bush Jr. Dr. Ken Bernard, Chief Medical Officer of the Homeland Security Department Dr. Alex Garza, eminent scientists, innovators and physicians in the field, and leaders of relevant technology companies. How well the US and global healthcare systems are prepared to withstand a pandemic or a bioterrorism attack, how the medical/healthcare field, government, and the technology sectors are involved in biosecurity and pandemic or bioterrorism response and how they interface, the rise of synthetic biology with its promises and threats, global bio-surveillance, making the medical diagnosis, isolation, containment, hospital surge capacity, stockpiling and distribution of countermeasures, food and agriculture biosecurity, new promising technologies for detection of bio-threats and countermeasures. Open to medical, graduate, and undergraduate students. No prior background in biology necessary. 4 units for twice weekly attendance (Mon. and Wed.); additional 1 unit for writing a research paper for 5 units total maximum.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Trounce, M. (PI)

BIOHOPK 43: Plant Biology, Evolution, and Ecology

Introduction to biology in a marine context. Principles of plant biology: physiology, structure, diversity. Principles of evolution: macro and microevolution, population genetics. Ecology: the principles governing the distribution and abundance of organisms; population, community, and ecosystem ecology. Equivalent to BIO 43. Corequisite: BIOHOPK 47.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

BIOHOPK 47: Ecology and Ecological Physiology

This course is a field-based inquiry into rocky intertidal shores that introducesnstudents to ecology and environmental physiology and the research methods used to study them. Students will learn how to detect patterns quantitatively in nature through appropriate sampling methods & statistical analysis. Following exploration of appropriate background material in class and through exploration of the scientific literature, students will learn how to formulate testable hypotheses regarding the underlying causes of the patterns they discern. A variety of different aspects of ecology and physiology will be investigated cooperatively by the students during the quarter, culminating in development of an individual final paper in the form of a research proposal based on data collected during the course. The course will provide a broad conceptual introduction to the underlying biological principles that influence adaptation to the planet¿s dynamic habitats, as well as inquiry-based experience in how to explore and understand complex systems in nature. nThis course fulfills the same laboratory requirement as BIO 47. Satisfies WIM in Biology.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

BIOHOPK 161H: Invertebrate Zoology (BIOHOPK 261H)

(Graduate students register for 261H.) Survey of invertebrate diversity emphasizing form and function in a phylogenetic framework. Morphological diversity, life histories, physiology, and ecology of the major invertebrate groups, concentrating on local marine forms as examples. Current views on the phylogenetic relationships and evolution of the invertebrates. Lectures, lab, plus field trips. Satisfies Central Menu Area 3 for Bio majors.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Watanabe, J. (PI)

BIOHOPK 162H: Comparative Animal Physiology (BIOHOPK 262H)

(Graduate students register for 262H.) How animals work. Topics: physiology of respiration, circulation, energy metabolism, thermal regulation, osmotic regulation, muscle physiology, and locomotion. Evolutionary and ecological physiology. Lectures, lab, and field research. An option to combine the course work with a more intensive research focus, with more units, is available. Satisfies Central Menu Area 3 for Bio majors. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Block, B. (PI)

BIOHOPK 163H: Oceanic Biology (BIOHOPK 263H)

(Graduate students register for 263H.) How the physics and chemistry of the oceanic environment affect marine plants and animals. Topics: seawater and ocean circulation, separation of light and nutrients in the two-layered ocean, oceanic food webs and trophic interactions, oceanic environments, biogeography, and global change. Lectures, discussion, and field trips. Satisfies Central Menu Area 4 for Bio majors. Recommended: PHYSICS 21 or 51, CHEM 31, or consent of instructor.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

BIOHOPK 166H: Molecular Ecology (BIOHOPK 266H)

(Graduate students register for 266H.) How modern technologies in gene sequencing, detection of nuclear nucleotide polymorphisms, and other approaches are used to gather data on genetic variation that allow measurement of population structure, infer demographic histories, inform conservation efforts, and advance understanding of the ecology of diverse types of organisms.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

BIOHOPK 167H: Nerve, Muscle, and Synapse (BIOHOPK 267H)

(Graduate students register for 267H.) Fundamental aspects of membrane excitability, nerve conduction, synaptic transmission, and excitation-contraction coupling. Emphasis is on biophysical, molecular, and cellular level analyses of these processes in vertebrate and invertebrate systems. Labs on intra- and extracellular recording and patch clamp techniques. Lectures, discussions, and labs. Satisfies Central Menu Area 3 for Bio majors Prerequisites: PHYSICS 23, 28, 43, or equivalent; CHEM 31, calculus; or consent of instructor.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

BIOHOPK 172H: Marine Ecology: From Organisms to Ecosystems (BIOHOPK 272H)

(Graduate students register for 272H.) This course incorporates the approaches of experimental ecology, biomechanics (ecomechanics), and physiology to develop an integrated perspective on the factors that govern the structures of marine ecosystems and how environment change, including anthropogenic influences, affects ecosystems' species composition and health. Focus is on rocky intertidal, kelp forest, estuarine, and midwater ecosystems of Monterey Bay. Experimental projects done in the field offer experience in a variety of ecological techniques and in analysis of ecological data. Students will engage in presentation and debates of current topics in marine ecology and conservation. Satisfies Central Menu Area 4 for Bio majors. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Fulfills WIM in Biology.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Micheli, F. (PI)

BIOHOPK 174H: Experimental Design and Probability (BIOHOPK 274H)

(Graduate students register for 274H.) Variability is an integral part of biology. Introduction to probability and its use in designing experiments to address biological problems. Focus is on analysis of variance, when and how to use it, why it works, and how to interpret the results. Design of complex, but practical, asymmetrical experiments and environmental impact studies, and regression and analysis of covariance. Computer-based data analysis. Prerequisite: Biology core or consent of instructor.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, GER:DB-Math, WAY-AQR, WAY-FR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Watanabe, J. (PI)

BIOHOPK 182H: Stanford at Sea (BIOHOPK 323H, EARTHSYS 323, ESS 323)

(Graduate students register for 323H.) Five weeks of marine science including oceanography, marine physiology, policy, maritime studies, conservation, and nautical science at Hopkins Marine Station, followed by five weeks at sea aboard a sailing research vessel in the Pacific Ocean. Shore component comprised of three multidisciplinary courses meeting daily and continuing aboard ship. Students develop an independent research project plan while ashore, and carry out the research at sea. In collaboration with the Sea Education Association of Woods Hole, MA. Only 6 units may count towards the Biology major.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 16 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

BIOHOPK 184H: Holistic Biology (BIOHOPK 284H)

(Graduate students register for 284H.) For majors and non-majors. Complexity in natural systems is examined from complementary points of view, including scientific, historical, philosophical and literary. Lectures and discussions will focus on the writings of Ed Ricketts and John Steinbeck, poetry of Robinson Jeffers and on historical and contemporary works concerning marine and fresh-water systems, resource management and climate change. A group project with individual contributions will be carried out and presented at a symposium. This course will involve a significant amount of creative writing, and it satisfies the Writing in Major requirement for Biology. It is open to all majors and classes. Only 6 units may count towards the Biology major.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 16 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CEE 63: Weather and Storms (CEE 263C)

Daily and severe weather and global climate. Topics: structure and composition of the atmosphere, fog and cloud formation, rainfall, local winds, wind energy, global circulation, jet streams, high and low pressure systems, inversions, el Niño, la Niña, atmosphere/ocean interactions, fronts, cyclones, thunderstorms, lightning, tornadoes, hurricanes, pollutant transport, global climate and atmospheric optics.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CEE 64: Air Pollution and Global Warming: History, Science, and Solutions (CEE 263D)

Survey of Survey of air pollution and global warming and their renewable energy solutions. Topics: evolution of the Earth's atmosphere, history of discovery of chemicals in the air, bases and particles in urban smog, visibility, indoor air pollution, acid rain, stratospheric and Antarctic ozone loss, the historic climate record, causes and effects of global warming, impacts of energy systems on pollution and climate, renewable energy solutions to air pollution and global warming. UG Reqs: GER: DBNatSci
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Jacobson, M. (PI)

CEE 162D: Introduction to Physical Oceanography (CEE 262D, EARTHSYS 164, ESS 148)

Formerly CEE 164. The dynamic basis of oceanography. Topics: physical environment; conservation equations for salt, heat, and momentum; geostrophic flows; wind-driven flows; the Gulf Stream; equatorial dynamics and ENSO; thermohaline circulation of the deep oceans; and tides. Prerequisite: PHYSICS 41 (formerly 53).
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CEE 196: Engineering Geology and Global Change (GS 115)

The application of geology and global change to the planning, design, and operation of engineering projects. Case histories taught in a seminar setting and field trips emphasize the impact of geology and global change on both individual engineering works and the built environment by considering Quaternary history and tectonics, anthropogenic sea level rise, active geologic processes, engineering properties of geologic deposits, site exploration, and professional ethics. Prerequisite: GS 1 or consent of instructor.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CHEM 26N: The What, Why, How and Wow's of Nanotechnology

Preference to freshmen. Introduction to nanotechnology with discussion of basic science at the nanoscale, its difference from molecular and macroscopic scales, and implications and applications. Developments in nanotechnology in the past two decades, from imaging and moving single atoms on surfaces to killing cancer cells with nanoscale tools and gadgets.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Dai, H. (PI)

CHEM 31A: Chemical Principles I

For students with moderate or no background in chemistry. Stoichiometry; periodicity; electronic structure and bonding; gases; enthalpy; phase behavior. Emphasis is on skills to address structural and quantitative chemical questions; lab provides practice. Recitation.
Terms: Aut, Sum | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CHEM 31B: Chemical Principles II

Chemical equilibrium; acids and bases; oxidation and reduction reactions; chemical thermodynamics; kinetics. Lab. Prerequisite: CHEM 31A.
Terms: Win, Sum | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CHEM 31X: Chemical Principles Accelerated

Accelerated; for students with substantial chemistry background. Chemical equilibria concepts, equilibrium constants, acids and bases, chemical thermodynamics, quantum concepts, models of ionic and covalent bonding, atomic and molecular orbital theory, periodicity, and bonding properties of matter. Recitation. Prerequisites: AP chemistry score of 5 or passing score on chemistry placement test, and AP Calculus AB score of 4 or Math 20. Recommended: high school physics.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Cox, C. (PI); Moerner, W. (PI)

CHEM 33: Structure and Reactivity of Organic Molecules

Introduction to organic chemistry. Learn to relate three dimensional structure of organic molecules to their chemical and physical properties. Introduced to a variety of functional groups that exhibit patterns of reactivity and learn how to predict products of a reaction in the context of thermodynamics and kinetics. Two hour weekly lab section accompanies the course to introduce the techniques of separation and identification of organic compounds. Prerequisite: 31A,B, or 31X, or AP Chemistry score of 5.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CHEM 35: Organic Chemistry of Bioactive Molecules

Focuses on the structure and reactivity of natural and synthetic bioactive molecules. Covers fundamental concepts underlying chemical reactivity and the logic of chemical synthesis for an appreciation of the profound impact of organic chemistry on humankind in fields ranging from medicine to earth and planetary science. A three hour lab section provides hands on experience with modern chemical methods for preparative and analytical chemistry. Prerequisite: Chem 33.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CHEM 130: Organic Chemistry Laboratory

Intermediate organic chemistry laboratory, including synthesis and spectroscopy. Nobel prize winning reactions and characterization techniques, such as Diels-Alder and modified Wittig reactions, as well as IR, NMR, and GCMS; Biodiesel synthesis and lipid characterization. Prerequisite: Chem 35 taken in Aut 2014-15 or later, or Chem 35 and 36. Corequisite: 131.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Vollmer-Snarr, H. (PI)

CHEM 131: Organic Polyfunctional Compounds

Aromatic compounds, polysaccharides, amino acids, proteins, natural products, dyes, purines, pyrimidines, nucleic acids, and polymers. Prerequisite: 35.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Trost, B. (PI)

CHEM 132: Synthesis Laboratory

Focus is on longer syntheses with an emphasis upon using metal catalysts. Emphasis will be on complete characterization of final products using chromatographic and spectroscopic methods. Concludes with an individual synthesis project. Prerequisites: 35, 130.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Brennan, M. (PI)

CHEM 134: Analytical Chemistry Laboratory

Classical analysis methods, statistical analyses, chromatography, and spectroscopy will be covered with an emphasis upon quantitative measurements and data analysis. WIM course with full lab reports and oral communication. Concludes with student-developed quantitative project. Prerequisite: Chem 35
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Cox, C. (PI); Dai, H. (PI)

CHEM 137: Macromolecular and Supramolecular Chemistry

The course covers the design and synthesis of polymers and supramolecular complexes. Polymer chemistry is built on our understanding of reactive organic intermediates and catalysis; supramolecular chemistry is based on our understanding of non-covalent interactions. Thus, application of such understandings to the synthesis of covalent and supramolecular polymers is a central theme of this course. Modern developments in polymer chemistry have allowed the synthesis of polymers with controlled molecular weights, architectures, tacticity, and rich functionalities. Such synthetic controls in macromolecular structures lead to diverse and tunable properties and functions of the produced materials. Therefore, this course also covers basic properties and structure-property relationships of macromolecules for rational design of structures and selection of chemistry. Prerequisite CHEM 35 and 131.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Xia, Y. (PI)

CHEM 151: Inorganic Chemistry I

Theories of electronic structure, stereochemistry, and symmetry properties of inorganic molecules. Topics: ionic and covalent interactions, electron-deficient bonding, and molecular orbital theories. Emphasis is on the chemistry of the metallic elements. An introduction to the Gaussian program will be covered in the discussion sections, used for electronic calculations in the computer and problem set exercises. Prerequisites: 35.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Stack, D. (PI)

CHEM 153: Inorganic Chemistry II

The theoretical aspects of inorganic chemistry. Group theory; many-electron atomic theory; molecular orbital theory emphasizing general concepts and group theory; ligand field theory; application of physical methods to predict the geometry, magnetism, and electronic spectra of transition metal complexes. Prerequisites: 151, 173.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Solomon, E. (PI)

CHEM 171: Physical Chemistry I

Laws of thermodynamics, properties of gases, phase transitions and phase equilibrium, chemical equilibrium, chemical kinetics, reaction rate, thermal motion and energy barriers, kinetic molecular models. The MATLAB programming language with hands-on experiences will be introduced in discussion sections and used for simulations of chemical systems. Prerequisites: CHEM 33; PHYS 41; either CME 100 or MATH 51.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Cui, B. (PI)

CHEM 173: Physical Chemistry II

Introduction to quantum chemistry: the basic principles of wave mechanics, the harmonic oscillator, the rigid rotator, infrared and microwave spectroscopy, the hydrogen atom, atomic structure, molecular structure, valence theory. Prerequisites: CHEM 171; CME 102 and CME 104 or MATH 53 or consent from instructor; PHYSICS 41, 43.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Martinez, T. (PI)

CHEM 174: Electrochemical Measurements Lab (CHEM 274)

Introduction to modern electrochemical measurement in a hands-on, laboratory setting. Students assemble and use electrochemical cells including indicator, reference, working and counter electrodes, with macro, micro and ultramicro geometries, salt bridges, ion-selective membranes, electrometers, potentiostats, galvanostats, and stationary and rotated disk electrodes. The later portion of the course will involve a student-generated project to experimentally characterize some electrochemical system. Prerequisites: 134, 171, MATH 51, PHYSICS 44 or equivalent.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Chidsey, C. (PI)

CHEM 175: Physical Chemistry III

Molecular theory of kinetics and statistical mechanics: transport and reactions in gases and liquids, ensembles and the Boltzmann distribution law, partition functions, molecular simulation, structure and dynamics of liquids. Diffusion and activation limited reactions, potential energy surfaces, collision theory, transition-state theory and Marcus theory of reaction rates. Prerequisites: 171, 173.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Markland, T. (PI)

CHEM 176: Spectroscopy Laboratory

Use of spectroscopic instrumentation to obtain familiarity with important types of spectrometers and spectroscopic method and to apply them to study molecular properties and physical chemical time-dependent processes. Spectrometers include electronic ultraviolet/visible absorption, fluorescence, Raman, Fourier transform infrared, and nuclear magnetic resonance. Prerequisite: 173.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Fayer, M. (PI)

CHEM 181: Biochemistry I (CHEMENG 181, CHEMENG 281)

Structure and function of major classes of biomolecules, including proteins, carbohydrates and lipids. Mechanistic analysis of properties of proteins including catalysis, signal transduction and membrane transport. Students will also learn to critically analyze data from the primary biochemical literature. Satisfies Central Menu Area 1 for Bio majors. Prerequisites: CHEM 35 and 135 or 171.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Cegelski, L. (PI)

CHEM 183: Biochemistry II (CHEMENG 183, CHEMENG 283)

Focus on metabolic biochemistry: the study of chemical reactions that provide the cell with the energy and raw materials necessary for life. Topics include glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, the citric acid cycle, oxidative phosphorylation, photosynthesis, the pentose phosphate pathway, and the metabolism of glycogen, fatty acids, amino acids, and nucleotides as well as the macromolecular machines that synthesize RNA, DNA, and proteins. Medical relevance is emphasized throughout. Satisfies Central Menu Area 1 for Bio majors. Prerequisite: CHEM 181 or CHEM 143 or CHEMENG 181/281.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Dunn, A. (PI); Gupta, A. (TA)

CHEM 184: Biological Chemistry Laboratory

Modern techniques in biological chemistry including protein purification, characterization of enzyme kinetics, heterologous expression of His-tagged fluorescent proteins, site-directed mutagenesis, and single-molecule fluorescence microscopy. Prerequisite: 181.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Cegelski, L. (PI)

CHEM 185: Biophysical Chemistry

Primary literature based seminar/discussion course covering classical and contemporary papers in biophysical chemistry. Topics include: protein structure and stability, folding, single molecule fluorescence and force microscopy, simulations, ion channels, GPCRs, and ribosome structure/function. Course is restricted to undergraduates: required for majors on the Biological Chemistry track, but open to students from the regular track. Prerequisites: Chem 171, 173 and 181.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Boxer, S. (PI)

CHEMENG 181: Biochemistry I (CHEM 181, CHEMENG 281)

Structure and function of major classes of biomolecules, including proteins, carbohydrates and lipids. Mechanistic analysis of properties of proteins including catalysis, signal transduction and membrane transport. Students will also learn to critically analyze data from the primary biochemical literature. Satisfies Central Menu Area 1 for Bio majors. Prerequisites: CHEM 35 and 135 or 171.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Cegelski, L. (PI)

CHEMENG 183: Biochemistry II (CHEM 183, CHEMENG 283)

Focus on metabolic biochemistry: the study of chemical reactions that provide the cell with the energy and raw materials necessary for life. Topics include glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, the citric acid cycle, oxidative phosphorylation, photosynthesis, the pentose phosphate pathway, and the metabolism of glycogen, fatty acids, amino acids, and nucleotides as well as the macromolecular machines that synthesize RNA, DNA, and proteins. Medical relevance is emphasized throughout. Satisfies Central Menu Area 1 for Bio majors. Prerequisite: CHEM 181 or CHEM 143 or CHEMENG 181/281.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Dunn, A. (PI); Gupta, A. (TA)

COMPMED 81N: Comparative Anatomy and Physiology of Mammals

Preference to freshmen. Emphasis is on a comparative approach to anatomy and physiology of a wide range of mammals, the unique adaptations of each species in terms of its anatomical, and behavioral characteristics, and how these species interact with human beings and other animals. Dissection required. Class size is limited to 16.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Bouley, D. (PI)

COMPMED 87Q: Laboratory Mouse in Biomedical Research

Preference to sophomores. Focus is on the laboratory mouse, a widely used and important research model. Topics include the ethics of animal use in research; the natural history, origin and husbandry of the mouse; characteristics of key mouse strains; its anatomy and physiology; common diseases and their effects on research; coat color genetics relative to human diseases; immunodeficient mouse models; and genetic engineering of mice. The laboratory includes necropsy, handling, introduction to anesthesia and surgery, identification methods, and common research techniques using live and dead mice. Enrollment limited to 14 students.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Nagamine, C. (PI)

EARTHSYS 4: Coevolution of Earth and Life (GS 4)

Earth is the only planet in the universe currently known to harbor life. When and how did Earth become inhabited? How have biological activities altered the planet? How have environmental changes affected the evolution of life? Are we living in a sixth mass extinction? In this course, we will develop and use the tools of geology, paleontology, geochemistry, and modeling that allow us to reconstruct Earth¿s 4.5 billion year history and to reconstruct the interactions between life and its host planet over the past 4 billion years. We will also ask what this long history can tell us about life¿s likely future on Earth. We will also use One half-day field trip.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Payne, J. (PI)

EARTHSYS 10: Introduction to Earth Systems

For non-majors and prospective Earth Systems majors. Multidisciplinary approach using the principles of geology, biology, engineering, and economics to describe how the Earth operates as an interconnected, integrated system. Goal is to understand global change on all time scales. Focus is on sciences, technological principles, and sociopolitical approaches applied to solid earth, oceans, water, energy, and food and population. Case studies: environmental degradation, loss of biodiversity, and resource sustainability.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EARTHSYS 11: Introduction to Geology (GS 1)

Why are earthquakes, volcanoes, and natural resources located at specific spots on the Earth surface? Why are there rolling hills to the west behind Stanford, and soaring granite walls to the east in Yosemite? What was the Earth like in the past, and what will it be like in the future? Lectures, hands-on laboratories, in-class activities, and one field trip will help you see the Earth through the eyes of a geologist. Topics include plate tectonics, the cycling and formation of different types of rocks, and how geologists use rocks to understand Earth's history.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Sperling, E. (PI)

EARTHSYS 37N: Climate Change: Science & Society

Preference to freshmen. How and why do greenhouse gases cause climate to change? How will a changing climate affect humans and natural ecosystems? What can be done to prevent climate change and better adapt to the climate change that does occur? Focus is on developing quantitative understanding of these issues rooted in both the physical and social sciences. Exercises based on simple quantitative observations and calculations; algebra only, no calculus.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

EARTHSYS 38N: The Worst Journey in the World: The Science, Literature, and History of Polar Exploration (ESS 38N, GS 38N)

This course examines the motivations and experiences of polar explorers under the harshest conditions on Earth, as well as the chronicles of their explorations and hardships, dating to the 1500s for the Arctic and the 1700s for the Antarctic. Materials include The Worst Journey in the World by Aspley Cherry-Garrard who in 1911 participated in a midwinter Antarctic sledging trip to recover emperor penguin eggs. Optional field trip into the high Sierra in March.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Dunbar, R. (PI)

EARTHSYS 39N: The Carbon Cycle: Reducing Your Impact

Preference to freshmen. Changes in the long- and short-term carbon cycle and global climate through the burning of fossil fuels since the Industrial Revolution. How people can shrink their carbon footprints. Long-term sources and sinks of carbon and how they are controlled by tectonics and short-term sources and sinks and the interaction between the biosphere and ocean. How people can shrink their carbon footprints. Held at the Stanford Community Farm.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EARTHSYS 56Q: Changes in the Coastal Ocean: The View From Monterey and San Francisco Bays (ESS 56Q)

Preference to sophomores. Recent changes in the California current, using Monterey Bay as an example. Current literature introduces principles of oceanography. Visits from researchers from MBARI, Hopkins, and UCSC. Optional field trip to MBARI and Monterey Bay.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EARTHSYS 90: Introduction to Geochemistry (GS 90)

The chemistry of the solid earth and its atmosphere and oceans, emphasizing the processes that control the distribution of the elements in the earth over geological time and at present, and on the conceptual and analytical tools needed to explore these questions. The basics of geochemical thermodynamics and isotope geochemistry. The formation of the elements, crust, atmosphere and oceans, global geochemical cycles, and the interaction of geochemistry, biological evolution, and climate. Recommended: introductory chemistry.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Stebbins, J. (PI)

EARTHSYS 104: The Water Course (GEOPHYS 70)

The Central Valley of California provides a third of the produce grown in the U.S., but has a desert climate, thus raising concerns about both food and water security. The pathway that water takes rainfall to the irrigation of fields (the water course) determines the quantity and quality of the available water. Working with various data sources (remote sensing, gauges, wells) allows us to model the water budget in the valley and explore the way in which recent droughts and increasing demand are impacting freshwater supplies.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EARTHSYS 110: Introduction to the foundations of contemporary geophysics (GEOPHYS 110)

Introduction to the foundations of contemporary geophysics. Topics drawn from broad themes in: whole Earth geodynamics, geohazards, natural resources, and enviroment. In each case the focus is on how the interpretation of a variety of geophysical measurements (e.g., gravity, seismology, heat flow, electromagnetics, and remote sensing) can be used to provide fundamental insight into the behavior of the Earth. Prerequisite: CME 100 or MA TH 51, or co-registration in either.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EARTHSYS 111: Biology and Global Change (BIO 117, ESS 111)

The biological causes and consequences of anthropogenic and natural changes in the atmosphere, oceans, and terrestrial and freshwater ecosystems. Topics: glacial cycles and marine circulation, greenhouse gases and climate change, tropical deforestation and species extinctions, and human population growth and resource use. Prerequisite: Biology or Human Biology core or graduate standing.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Arrigo, K. (PI)

EARTHSYS 116: Ecology of the Hawaiian Islands (BIO 116)

Terrestrial and marine ecology and conservation biology of the Hawaiian Archipelago. Taught in the field in Hawaii as part of quarter-long sequence of courses including Earth Sciences and Anthropology. Topics include ecological succession, plant-soil interactions, conservation biology, biological invasions and ecosystem consequences, and coral reef ecology. Restricted to students accepted into the Earth Systems of Hawaii Program.
Terms: alternate years, given next year | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

EARTHSYS 122: Evolution of Marine Ecosystems (BIO 119, GS 123, GS 223B)

Life originally evolved in the ocean. When, why, and how did the major transitions occur in the history of marine life? What triggered the rapid evolution and diversification of animals in the Cambrian, after more than 3.5 billion years of Earth's history? What caused Earth's major mass extinction events? How do ancient extinction events compare to current threats to marine ecosystems? How has the evolution of primary producers impacted animals, and how has animal evolution impacted primary producers? In this course, we will review the latest evidence regarding these major questions in the history of marine ecosystems. We will develop familiarity with the most common groups of marine animal fossils. We will also conduct original analyses of paleontological data, developing skills both in the framing and testing of scientific hypotheses and in data analysis and presentation.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Heim, N. (PI); Payne, J. (PI)

EARTHSYS 141: Remote Sensing of the Oceans (EARTHSYS 241, ESS 141, ESS 241, GEOPHYS 141)

How to observe and interpret physical and biological changes in the oceans using satellite technologies. Topics: principles of satellite remote sensing, classes of satellite remote sensors, converting radiometric data into biological and physical quantities, sensor calibration and validation, interpreting large-scale oceanographic features.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-AQR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Arrigo, K. (PI)

EARTHSYS 144: Fundamentals of Geographic Information Science (GIS) (ESS 164)

Survey of geographic information including maps, satellite imagery, and census data, approaches to spatial data, and tools for integrating and examining spatially-explicit data. Emphasis is on fundamental concepts of geographic information science and associated technologies. Topics include geographic data structure, cartography, remotely sensed data, statistical analysis of geographic data, spatial analysis, map design, and geographic information system software. Computer lab assignments. All students are required to attend a weekly lab session.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EARTHSYS 155: Science of Soils (ESS 155)

Physical, chemical, and biological processes within soil systems. Emphasis is on factors governing nutrient availability, plant growth and production, land-resource management, and pollution within soils. How to classify soils and assess nutrient cycling and contaminant fate. Recommended: introductory chemistry and biology.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Fendorf, S. (PI)

EARTHSYS 164: Introduction to Physical Oceanography (CEE 162D, CEE 262D, ESS 148)

Formerly CEE 164. The dynamic basis of oceanography. Topics: physical environment; conservation equations for salt, heat, and momentum; geostrophic flows; wind-driven flows; the Gulf Stream; equatorial dynamics and ENSO; thermohaline circulation of the deep oceans; and tides. Prerequisite: PHYSICS 41 (formerly 53).
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

EARTHSYS 170: Environmental Geochemistry (GS 170, GS 270)

Solid, aqueous, and gaseous phases comprising the environment, their natural compositional variations, and chemical interactions. Contrast between natural sources of hazardous elements and compounds and types and sources of anthropogenic contaminants and pollutants. Chemical and physical processes of weathering and soil formation. Chemical factors that affect the stability of solids and aqueous species under earth surface conditions. The release, mobility, and fate of contaminants in natural waters and the roles that water and dissolved substances play in the physical behavior of rocks and soils. The impact of contaminants and design of remediation strategies. Case studies. Prerequisite: 90 or consent of instructor.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

EARTHSYS 180: Principles and Practices of Sustainable Agriculture (ESS 280)

Field-based training in ecologically sound agricultural practices at the Stanford Community Farm. Weekly lessons, field work, and group projects. Field trips to educational farms in the area. Topics include: soils, composting, irrigation techniques, IPM, basic plant anatomy and physiology, weeds, greenhouse management, and marketing.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Archie, P. (PI)

EARTHSYS 323: Stanford at Sea (BIOHOPK 182H, BIOHOPK 323H, ESS 323)

(Graduate students register for 323H.) Five weeks of marine science including oceanography, marine physiology, policy, maritime studies, conservation, and nautical science at Hopkins Marine Station, followed by five weeks at sea aboard a sailing research vessel in the Pacific Ocean. Shore component comprised of three multidisciplinary courses meeting daily and continuing aboard ship. Students develop an independent research project plan while ashore, and carry out the research at sea. In collaboration with the Sea Education Association of Woods Hole, MA. Only 6 units may count towards the Biology major.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 16 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ECON 155: Environmental Economics and Policy

Economic sources of environmental problems and alternative policies for dealing with them (technology standards, emissions taxes, and marketable pollution permits). Evaluation of policies addressing local air pollution, global climate change, and the use of renewable resources. Connections between population growth, economic output, environmental quality, sustainable development, and human welfare. Prerequisite: ECON 50. May be taken concurrently with consent of the instructor.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Goulder, L. (PI)

EE 65: Modern Physics for Engineers

This course introduces the core ideas of modern physics that enable applications ranging from solar energy and efficient lighting to the modern electronic and optical devices and nanotechnologies that sense, process, store, communicate and display all our information. Though the ideas have broad impact, the course is widely accessible to engineering and science students with only basic linear algebra and calculus through simple ordinary differential equations as mathematics background. Topics include the quantum mechanics of electrons and photons (Schrödinger's equation, atoms, electrons, energy levels and energy bands; absorption and emission of photons; quantum confinement in nanostructures), the statistical mechanics of particles (entropy, the Boltzmann factor, thermal distributions), the thermodynamics of light (thermal radiation, limits to light concentration, spontaneous and stimulated emission), and the physics of information (Maxwell¿s demon, reversibility, entropy and noise in physics and information theory). Pre-requisite: Physics 41. Pre- or co-requisite: Math 53 or CME 102.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Heinz, T. (PI)

EMED 122: Biosecurity and Bioterrorism Response (BIOE 122, EMED 222, PUBLPOL 122, PUBLPOL 222)

Overview of the most pressing biosecurity issues facing the world today. Guest lecturers have included former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice, former Special Assistant on BioSecurity to Presidents Clinton and Bush Jr. Dr. Ken Bernard, Chief Medical Officer of the Homeland Security Department Dr. Alex Garza, eminent scientists, innovators and physicians in the field, and leaders of relevant technology companies. How well the US and global healthcare systems are prepared to withstand a pandemic or a bioterrorism attack, how the medical/healthcare field, government, and the technology sectors are involved in biosecurity and pandemic or bioterrorism response and how they interface, the rise of synthetic biology with its promises and threats, global bio-surveillance, making the medical diagnosis, isolation, containment, hospital surge capacity, stockpiling and distribution of countermeasures, food and agriculture biosecurity, new promising technologies for detection of bio-threats and countermeasures. Open to medical, graduate, and undergraduate students. No prior background in biology necessary. 4 units for twice weekly attendance (Mon. and Wed.); additional 1 unit for writing a research paper for 5 units total maximum.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Trounce, M. (PI)

ESS 38N: The Worst Journey in the World: The Science, Literature, and History of Polar Exploration (EARTHSYS 38N, GS 38N)

This course examines the motivations and experiences of polar explorers under the harshest conditions on Earth, as well as the chronicles of their explorations and hardships, dating to the 1500s for the Arctic and the 1700s for the Antarctic. Materials include The Worst Journey in the World by Aspley Cherry-Garrard who in 1911 participated in a midwinter Antarctic sledging trip to recover emperor penguin eggs. Optional field trip into the high Sierra in March.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Dunbar, R. (PI)

ESS 56Q: Changes in the Coastal Ocean: The View From Monterey and San Francisco Bays (EARTHSYS 56Q)

Preference to sophomores. Recent changes in the California current, using Monterey Bay as an example. Current literature introduces principles of oceanography. Visits from researchers from MBARI, Hopkins, and UCSC. Optional field trip to MBARI and Monterey Bay.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ESS 111: Biology and Global Change (BIO 117, EARTHSYS 111)

The biological causes and consequences of anthropogenic and natural changes in the atmosphere, oceans, and terrestrial and freshwater ecosystems. Topics: glacial cycles and marine circulation, greenhouse gases and climate change, tropical deforestation and species extinctions, and human population growth and resource use. Prerequisite: Biology or Human Biology core or graduate standing.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Arrigo, K. (PI)

ESS 141: Remote Sensing of the Oceans (EARTHSYS 141, EARTHSYS 241, ESS 241, GEOPHYS 141)

How to observe and interpret physical and biological changes in the oceans using satellite technologies. Topics: principles of satellite remote sensing, classes of satellite remote sensors, converting radiometric data into biological and physical quantities, sensor calibration and validation, interpreting large-scale oceanographic features.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-AQR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Arrigo, K. (PI)

ESS 148: Introduction to Physical Oceanography (CEE 162D, CEE 262D, EARTHSYS 164)

Formerly CEE 164. The dynamic basis of oceanography. Topics: physical environment; conservation equations for salt, heat, and momentum; geostrophic flows; wind-driven flows; the Gulf Stream; equatorial dynamics and ENSO; thermohaline circulation of the deep oceans; and tides. Prerequisite: PHYSICS 41 (formerly 53).
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ESS 155: Science of Soils (EARTHSYS 155)

Physical, chemical, and biological processes within soil systems. Emphasis is on factors governing nutrient availability, plant growth and production, land-resource management, and pollution within soils. How to classify soils and assess nutrient cycling and contaminant fate. Recommended: introductory chemistry and biology.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Fendorf, S. (PI)

ESS 164: Fundamentals of Geographic Information Science (GIS) (EARTHSYS 144)

Survey of geographic information including maps, satellite imagery, and census data, approaches to spatial data, and tools for integrating and examining spatially-explicit data. Emphasis is on fundamental concepts of geographic information science and associated technologies. Topics include geographic data structure, cartography, remotely sensed data, statistical analysis of geographic data, spatial analysis, map design, and geographic information system software. Computer lab assignments. All students are required to attend a weekly lab session.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ESS 241: Remote Sensing of the Oceans (EARTHSYS 141, EARTHSYS 241, ESS 141, GEOPHYS 141)

How to observe and interpret physical and biological changes in the oceans using satellite technologies. Topics: principles of satellite remote sensing, classes of satellite remote sensors, converting radiometric data into biological and physical quantities, sensor calibration and validation, interpreting large-scale oceanographic features.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-AQR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Arrigo, K. (PI)

GEOPHYS 20N: Predicting Volcanic Eruptions

The physics and chemistry of volcanic processes and modern methods of volcano monitoring. Volcanoes as manifestations of the Earth's internal energy and hazards to society. How earth scientists better forecast eruptive activity by monitoring seismic activity, bulging of the ground surface, and the discharge of volcanic gases, and by studying deposits from past eruptions. Focus is on the interface between scientists and policy makers and the challenges of decision making with incomplete information. Field trip to Mt. St. Helens, site of the 1980 eruption.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Segall, P. (PI)

GEOPHYS 50N: Planetary Habitability, World View, and Sustainability

Sustainability lessons from the geological past Life on Earth has partially perished in sudden mass extinctions several time over the Earth's history. Threats include actions of our own volition, including fossil fuel burning as well as natural events, including the impact of large asteroids. The end Permian 250 million years ago and end Paleocene 55 million years ago extinctions involved natural burning of fossil fuels. The 65 million year ago end Cretaceous extinction involved the impact of and asteroid and possibly fossil fuel burning. Related sustainability topics in the popular press will be discussed as they arise. Student pairs lead discussions on topics on how humanity might avert these catastrophes. Offered occasionally.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

GEOPHYS 70: The Water Course (EARTHSYS 104)

The Central Valley of California provides a third of the produce grown in the U.S., but has a desert climate, thus raising concerns about both food and water security. The pathway that water takes rainfall to the irrigation of fields (the water course) determines the quantity and quality of the available water. Working with various data sources (remote sensing, gauges, wells) allows us to model the water budget in the valley and explore the way in which recent droughts and increasing demand are impacting freshwater supplies.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

GEOPHYS 110: Introduction to the foundations of contemporary geophysics (EARTHSYS 110)

Introduction to the foundations of contemporary geophysics. Topics drawn from broad themes in: whole Earth geodynamics, geohazards, natural resources, and enviroment. In each case the focus is on how the interpretation of a variety of geophysical measurements (e.g., gravity, seismology, heat flow, electromagnetics, and remote sensing) can be used to provide fundamental insight into the behavior of the Earth. Prerequisite: CME 100 or MA TH 51, or co-registration in either.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

GEOPHYS 120: Ice, Water, Fire (GEOPHYS 220)

Introductory application of continuum mechanics to ice sheets and glaciers, water waves and tsunamis, and volcanoes. Emphasis on physical processes and mathematical description using balance of mass and momentum, combined with constitutive equations for fluids and solids. Designed for undergraduates with no prior geophysics background; also appropriate for beginning graduate students. Prerequisites: CME 100 or MATH 52 and PHYSICS 41 (or equivalent).
Terms: given next year | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-FR, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

GEOPHYS 130: Introductory Seismology

Introduction to seismology including: elasticity and the wave equation, P, S, and surface waves, dispersion, ray theory, reflection and transmission of seismic waves, seismic imaging, large-scale Earth structure, earthquake location, earthquake statistics and forecasting, magnitude scales, seismic source theory.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

GEOPHYS 141: Remote Sensing of the Oceans (EARTHSYS 141, EARTHSYS 241, ESS 141, ESS 241)

How to observe and interpret physical and biological changes in the oceans using satellite technologies. Topics: principles of satellite remote sensing, classes of satellite remote sensors, converting radiometric data into biological and physical quantities, sensor calibration and validation, interpreting large-scale oceanographic features.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-AQR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Arrigo, K. (PI)

GEOPHYS 150: Geodynamics: Our Dynamic Earth (GEOPHYS 250)

What processes determine the large-scale structure and motion of Earth? How does convection deep within Earth drive plate tectonics and the formation of ocean basins and mountain ranges? Drawing from fundamental principles of mechanics and thermodynamics, we develop mathematical theories for heat flow, mantle convection, and the bending and breaking of Earth's brittle crust. Scaling arguments and dimensional analysis provide intuition that is refined through analytical and numerical solution (in MATLAB) of the governing equations and validated through comparison with observations. Prerequisites: differential equations (CME 104 or MATH 53); mechanics and thermodynamics (PHYSICS 41 and 45); prior programming experience (CME 192 or CS 106A) is recommended.
Terms: offered occasionally | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

GEOPHYS 182: Reflection Seismology (GEOPHYS 222)

The principles of seismic reflection profiling, focusing on methods of seismic data acquisition and seismic data processing for hydrocarbon exploration.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

GES 50Q: The Coastal Zone Environment

Preference to sophomores. The oceanographic, geological, and biological character of coastal zone environments, including continental shelves, estuaries, and coastal wetlands, with emphasis on San Francisco Bay. Five required field trips examine estuarine and coastal environments, and agencies and facilities that manage these resources. Students present original research. Prerequisite: beginning course in Biology such as BIOSCI 51, Chemistry such as CHEM 30 or 31, Earth Sciences such as GES 1 or 2, or Earth Systems such as EARTHSYS 10.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

GS 1: Introduction to Geology (EARTHSYS 11)

Why are earthquakes, volcanoes, and natural resources located at specific spots on the Earth surface? Why are there rolling hills to the west behind Stanford, and soaring granite walls to the east in Yosemite? What was the Earth like in the past, and what will it be like in the future? Lectures, hands-on laboratories, in-class activities, and one field trip will help you see the Earth through the eyes of a geologist. Topics include plate tectonics, the cycling and formation of different types of rocks, and how geologists use rocks to understand Earth's history.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Sperling, E. (PI)

GS 4: Coevolution of Earth and Life (EARTHSYS 4)

Earth is the only planet in the universe currently known to harbor life. When and how did Earth become inhabited? How have biological activities altered the planet? How have environmental changes affected the evolution of life? Are we living in a sixth mass extinction? In this course, we will develop and use the tools of geology, paleontology, geochemistry, and modeling that allow us to reconstruct Earth¿s 4.5 billion year history and to reconstruct the interactions between life and its host planet over the past 4 billion years. We will also ask what this long history can tell us about life¿s likely future on Earth. We will also use One half-day field trip.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Payne, J. (PI)

GS 8: Oceanography: An Introduction to the Marine Environment

For non-majors and earth science and environmental majors. Topics: topography and geology of the sea floor; evolution of ocean basins; circulation of ocean and atmosphere; nature of sea water, waves, and tides; and the history of the major ocean basins. The interface between continents and ocean basins, emphasizing estuaries, beaches, and continental shelves with California margin examples. Relationships among the distribution of inorganic constituents, ocean circulation, biologic productivity, and marine environments from deep sea to the coast. One-day field trip to measure and analyze waves and currents.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

GS 38N: The Worst Journey in the World: The Science, Literature, and History of Polar Exploration (EARTHSYS 38N, ESS 38N)

This course examines the motivations and experiences of polar explorers under the harshest conditions on Earth, as well as the chronicles of their explorations and hardships, dating to the 1500s for the Arctic and the 1700s for the Antarctic. Materials include The Worst Journey in the World by Aspley Cherry-Garrard who in 1911 participated in a midwinter Antarctic sledging trip to recover emperor penguin eggs. Optional field trip into the high Sierra in March.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Dunbar, R. (PI)

GS 40N: Diamonds

Preference to freshmen. Topics include the history of diamonds as gemstones, prospecting and mining, and their often tragic politics. How diamond samples provide clues for geologists to understand the Earth's deep interior and the origins of the solar system. Diamond's unique materials properties and efforts in synthesizing diamonds.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Mao, W. (PI)

GS 55Q: The California Gold Rush: Geologic Background and Environmental Impact

Preference to sophomores. Topics include: geologic processes that led to the concentration of gold in the river gravels and rocks of the Mother Lode region of California; and environmental impact of the Gold Rush due to population increase, mining operations, and high concentrations of arsenic and mercury in sediments from hard rock mining and milling operations. Recommended: introductory geology.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA, Writing 2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

GS 90: Introduction to Geochemistry (EARTHSYS 90)

The chemistry of the solid earth and its atmosphere and oceans, emphasizing the processes that control the distribution of the elements in the earth over geological time and at present, and on the conceptual and analytical tools needed to explore these questions. The basics of geochemical thermodynamics and isotope geochemistry. The formation of the elements, crust, atmosphere and oceans, global geochemical cycles, and the interaction of geochemistry, biological evolution, and climate. Recommended: introductory chemistry.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Stebbins, J. (PI)

GS 102: Earth Materials: Introduction to Mineralogy

The minerals and materials that comprise the earth and their uses in modern society. How to identify, classify, and interpret rock-forming minerals. Emphasis is on information provided by common minerals about the nature of the Earth's interior and processes such as magmatism and metamorphism that operate there, as well as the major processes of weathering and erosion that link plate tectonics to earth cycles. Required lab section. Prerequisite: introductory geology course. Recommended: introductory chemistry.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Brown, G. (PI); Mao, W. (PI)

GS 106: Sedimentary Geology and Depositional Systems

Topics: weathering, erosion and transportation, deposition, origins of sedimentary structures and textures, sediment composition, diagenesis, sedimentary facies, tectonics and sedimentation, and the characteristics of the major siliciclastic and carbonate depositional environments. Required Lab Section: methods of analysis of sediments in hand specimen and thin section. There is a required field problem trips to the field site(s) during the quarter, data collection and analysis, and preparation of a final written and oral report. Prerequisites: 1, 102, 103.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Graham, S. (PI); Lowe, D. (PI)

GS 110: Structural Geology and Tectonics (GS 294)

Theory, principles, and practical techniques to measure, describe, analyze, and interpret deformation-related structures on Earth. Collection of fault and fold data in the field followed by lab and computer analysis; interpretation of geologic maps and methods of cross-section construction; structural analysis of fault zone and metamorphic rocks; measuring deformation; regional structural styles and associated landforms related to plate tectonic convergence, rifting, and strike-slip faulting; the evolution of mountain belts and formation of sedimentary basins. Prerequisite: GS 1, calculus. Recommended: 102.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

GS 115: Engineering Geology and Global Change (CEE 196)

The application of geology and global change to the planning, design, and operation of engineering projects. Case histories taught in a seminar setting and field trips emphasize the impact of geology and global change on both individual engineering works and the built environment by considering Quaternary history and tectonics, anthropogenic sea level rise, active geologic processes, engineering properties of geologic deposits, site exploration, and professional ethics. Prerequisite: GS 1 or consent of instructor.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

GS 123: Evolution of Marine Ecosystems (BIO 119, EARTHSYS 122, GS 223B)

Life originally evolved in the ocean. When, why, and how did the major transitions occur in the history of marine life? What triggered the rapid evolution and diversification of animals in the Cambrian, after more than 3.5 billion years of Earth's history? What caused Earth's major mass extinction events? How do ancient extinction events compare to current threats to marine ecosystems? How has the evolution of primary producers impacted animals, and how has animal evolution impacted primary producers? In this course, we will review the latest evidence regarding these major questions in the history of marine ecosystems. We will develop familiarity with the most common groups of marine animal fossils. We will also conduct original analyses of paleontological data, developing skills both in the framing and testing of scientific hypotheses and in data analysis and presentation.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Heim, N. (PI); Payne, J. (PI)

GS 130: Soil Physics and Hydrology

The occurrence, distribution, circulation, and reaction of water at the surface and within the near surface. Topics: precipitation, evapotranspiration, infiltration and vadose zone, groundwater, surface water and streamflow generation, and water balance estimates. Current and classic theory in soil physics and hydrology. Urban, rangeland, and forested environments.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

GS 131: Hydrologically-Driven Landscape Evolution

Materials of the Earth and hydrologically driven landscape processes. Topics: hillslope hydrology, weathering of rocks and soils, erosion, flow failures, mass wasting, and conceptual models of landscape evolution. Current and classic theory in geomorphology.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

GS 170: Environmental Geochemistry (EARTHSYS 170, GS 270)

Solid, aqueous, and gaseous phases comprising the environment, their natural compositional variations, and chemical interactions. Contrast between natural sources of hazardous elements and compounds and types and sources of anthropogenic contaminants and pollutants. Chemical and physical processes of weathering and soil formation. Chemical factors that affect the stability of solids and aqueous species under earth surface conditions. The release, mobility, and fate of contaminants in natural waters and the roles that water and dissolved substances play in the physical behavior of rocks and soils. The impact of contaminants and design of remediation strategies. Case studies. Prerequisite: 90 or consent of instructor.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

GS 171: Geochemical Thermodynamics

Introduction to the application of chemical principles and concepts to geologic systems. The chemical behavior of fluids, minerals, and gases using simple equilibrium approaches to modeling the geochemical consequences of diagenetic, hydrothermal, metamorphic, and igneous processes. Topics: reversible thermodynamics, solution chemistry, mineral-solution equilibria, reaction kinetics, and the distribution and transport of elements by geologic processes. Prerequisite: GS 102.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

GS 185: Volcanology (GS 285A)

For juniors, seniors, and beginning graduate students. Eruptive processes that create volcanic deposits and landforms; shield, stratocone, and composite volcanoes, lava dome fields; calderas. Control of magma viscosity and water content on eruptive style. Fluid dynamic controls on the characteristics of lavas and pyroclastic flows. Submarine and subglacial eruptions and interaction of magma with groundwater. Rhyolitic supereruptions and flood basalts: effects on climate and atmospheric chemistry, relation to extinction events. Volcanic hazards and mitigating risk. Geophysical monitoring of active volcanoes. Volcanic-hosted geothermal systems and mineral resources. Those taking the class for 4 units will complete a 3-hour weekly lab that emphasizes recognizing types of lavas and products of explosive eruptions in hand specimen and thin section. Prerequisite: 1, for those taking the course for 3 units; 103 and 104 or equivalent for those taking the course for 4 units.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Mahood, G. (PI)

HUMBIO 2A: Genetics, Evolution, and Ecology

Introduction to the principles of classical and modern genetics, evolutionary theory, and population biology. Topics: micro- and macro-evolution, population and molecular genetics, biodiversity, and ecology, emphasizing the genetics and ecology of the evolutionary process and applications to human populations. HUMBIO 2A and HUMBIO 2B are designed to be taken concurrently and exams for both sides may include material from joint module lectures. Concurrent enrollment is strongly encouraged and is necessary for majors in order to meet declaration deadlines. Please note Human Biology majors are required to take the Human Biology Core Courses for a letter grade.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HUMBIO 3A: Cell and Developmental Biology

The principles of the biology of cells: principles of human developmental biology, biochemistry of energetics and metabolism, the nature of membranes and organelles, hormone action and signal transduction in normal and diseased states (diabetes, cancer, autoimmune diseases), drug discovery, immunology, and drug addiction. HUMBIO 3A and HUMBIO 3B are designed to be taken concurrently and exams for both sides may include material from joint module lectures. Concurrent enrollment is strongly encouraged and is necessary for majors in order to meet declaration deadlines. Please note Human Biology majors are required to take the Human Biology Core Courses for a letter grade. Prerequisite: college chemistry or completion of the HumBio Core on-line chemistry lecture series during the fall quarter.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HUMBIO 4A: The Human Organism

Integrative Physiology: Neurobiology, endocrinology, and organ system function, control, and regulation. HUMBIO 4A and HUMBIO 4B are designed to be taken concurrently and exams for both sides may include material from joint module lectures. Concurrent enrollment is strongly encouraged and is necessary for majors in order to meet declaration deadlines. Please note Human Biology majors are required to take the Human Biology Core Courses for a letter grade.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HUMBIO 6: Human Origins (ANTHRO 6, ANTHRO 206)

The human fossil record from the first non-human primates in the late Cretaceous or early Paleocene, 80-65 million years ago, to the anatomically modern people in the late Pleistocene, between 100,000 to 50,000 B.C.E. Emphasis is on broad evolutionary trends and the natural selective forces behind them.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HUMBIO 91Q: Neuroethology: The Neural Control of Behavior (BIO 32Q)

Preference to sophomores. Animal behavior offers insights about evolutionary adaptations and this seminar will discuss the origins of the study of animal behavior and its development to the present. How does the nervous system control behavior and how is it changed by behavior? We will analyze and discuss original research papers about the neural basis of behavior. The use and misuse of parallels between animal and human behavior. Possible field trip to observe animals in their natural habitat.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Fernald, R. (PI)

HUMBIO 112: Conservation Biology: A Latin American Perspective (BIO 144, BIO 234)

Principles and application of the science of preserving biological diversity. Conceptually, this course is designed to explore 4 major components relevant to the conservation of biodiversity, as exemplified by the Latin American region. The conceptual frameworks and principles, however, should be generally applicable, and provide insights for all regions of the world, including those of lesser biodiversity. Satisfies Central Menu Area 4 for Bio majors. Prerequisite: BIO 101, or BIO 43 or HUMBIO 2A with consent of instructor. Graduate level students will be expected to conduct a literature research exercise leading to a written paper, addressing a topic of their choosing, derived from any of the themes discussed in class.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HUMBIO 133: Human Physiology (BIO 112)

Human physiology will be examined by organ systems: cardiovascular, respiratory, renal, gastrointestinal and endocrine. Molecular and cell biology and signaling principles that underlie organ development, pathophysiology and opportunities for regenerative medicine are discussed, as well as integrative control mechanisms and fetal development. Prerequisite: Human Biology core, Biology core, or equivalent, or consent of instructor.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Kao, P. (PI)

HUMBIO 145L: The Biology and Evolution of Language (ANTHRO 171, ANTHRO 271)

Lecture course surveying the biology, linguistic functions, and evolution of the organs of speech and speech centers in the brain, language in animals and humans, the evolution of language itself, and the roles of innateness vs. culture in language. Suitable both for general education and as preparation for further studies in anthropology, biology, linguistics, medicine, psychology, and speech & language therapy. Anthropology concentration: CS, EE. No prerequisites.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

HUMBIO 158: The Human Genome and Disease (BIO 109A, BIOC 109A, BIOC 209A)

The variability of the human genome and the role of genomic information in research, drug discovery, and human health. Concepts and interpretations of genomic markers in medical research and real life applications. Human genomes in diverse populations. Original contributions from thought leaders in academia and industry and interaction between students and guest lecturers. Students with a major, minor or coterm in Biology: 109A/209A or 109B/209B may count toward degree program but not both.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HUMBIO 160: Human Behavioral Biology (BIO 150)

Multidisciplinary. How to approach complex normal and abnormal behaviors through biology. How to integrate disciplines including sociobiology, ethology, neuroscience, and endocrinology to examine behaviors such as aggression, sexual behavior, language use, and mental illness.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Sapolsky, R. (PI)

HUMBIO 161: The Neurobiology of Sleep (BIO 149, BIO 249)

Preference to seniors and graduate students. The neurochemistry and neurophysiology of changes in brain activity and conscious awareness associated with changes in the sleep/wake state. Behavioral and neurobiological phenomena including sleep regulation, sleep homeostasis, circadian rhythms, sleep disorders, sleep function, and the molecular biology of sleep. Enrollment limited to 16.
Terms: alternate years, given next year | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HUMBIO 163: Neural Systems and Behavior (BIO 263)

The field of neuroethology and its vertebrate and invertebrate model systems. Research-oriented. Readings include reviews and original papers. How animal brains compare; how neural circuits are adapted to species-typical behavior; and how the sensory worlds of different species represent the world. Lectures and required discussions. Satisfies Central Menu Area 3 for Bio majors. Prerequisites: BIO 42, HUMBIO 4A.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HUMBIO 167: The Art of Vision

This course is about eyes and art. We explore how eyes are built, how they process visual information, and how they are affected by disease. And we explore how fine art and famous artists (from all eras, ancient to modern) have depended upon vision, both normal and abnormal. There are short diversions into animal eyes and the role of vision in music, literature, and sports. Prerequisite: HumBio 4A or BIO 42 or consent of Instructor.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Marmor, M. (PI)

HUMBIO 180: Human Skeletal Anatomy (ANTHRO 175, ANTHRO 275, BIO 174, BIO 274)

Study of the human skeleton (a. k. a. human osteology), as it bears on other disciplines, including medicine, forensics, archaeology, and paleoanthropology (human evolution). Basic bone biology, anatomy, and development, emphasizing hands-on examination and identification of human skeletal parts, their implications for determining an individual¿s age, sex, geographic origin, and health status, and for the evolutionary history of our species. Three hours of lecture and at least three hours of supervised and independent study in the lab each week.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Klein, R. (PI)

PHYSICS 15: Stars and Planets in a Habitable Universe

Is the Earth unique in our galaxy? Students learn how stars and our galaxy have evolved and how this produces planets and the conditions suitable for life. Discussion of the motion of the night sky and how telescopes collect and analyze light. The life-cycle of stars from birth to death, and the end products of that life cycle -- from dense stellar corpses to supernova explosions. Course covers recent discoveries of extrasolar planets -- those orbiting stars beyond our sun -- and the ultimate quest for other Earths. Intended to be accessible to non-science majors, material is explored quantitatively with problem sets using basic algebra and numerical estimates. Sky observing exercise and observatory field trips supplement the classroom work.
Terms: Aut, Sum | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PHYSICS 16: The Origin and Development of the Cosmos

How did the present Universe come to be? The last few decades have seen remarkable progress in understanding this age-old question. Course will cover the history of the Universe from its earliest moments to the present day, and the physical laws that govern its evolution. The early Universe including inflation and the creation of matter and the elements. Recent discoveries in our understanding of the makeup of the cosmos, including dark matter and dark energy. Evolution of galaxies, clusters, and quasars, and the Universe as a whole. Implications of dark matter and dark energy for the future evolution of the cosmos. Intended to be accessible to non-science majors, material is explored quantitatively with problem sets using basic algebra and numerical estimates.
Terms: Win, Sum | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PHYSICS 17: Black Holes and Extreme Astrophysics

Black holes represent an extreme frontier of astrophysics. Course will explore the most fundamental and universal force -- gravity -- and how it controls the fate of astrophysical objects, leading in some cases to black holes. How we discover and determine the properties of black holes and their environment. How black holes and their event horizons are used to guide thinking about mysterious phenomena such as Hawking radiation, wormholes, and quantum entanglement. How black holes generate gravitational waves and powerful jets of particles and radiation. Other extreme objects such as pulsars. Relevant physics, including relativity, is introduced and treated at the algebraic level. No prior physics or calculus is required, although some deep thinking about space, time, and matter is important in working through assigned problems.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PHYSICS 18N: Frontiers in Theoretical Physics and Cosmology

Preference to freshmen. The course will begin with a description of the current standard models of gravitation, cosmology, and elementary particle physics. We will then focus on frontiers of current understanding including investigations of very early universe cosmology, string theory, and the physics of black holes.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Dimopoulos, S. (PI)

PHYSICS 19: How Things Work: An Introduction to Physics

Introduction to the principles of physics through familiar objects and phenomena, including airplanes, cameras, computers, engines, refrigerators, lightning, radio, microwave ovens, and fluorescent lights. Estimates of real quantities from simple calculations. Prerequisite: high school algebra and trigonometry.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PHYSICS 21: Mechanics, Fluids, and Heat

How are the motions of objects and the behavior of fluids and gases determined by the laws of physics? Students learn to describe the motion of objects (kinematics) and understand why objects move as they do (dynamics). Emphasis on how Newton's three laws of motion are applied to solids, liquids, and gases to describe phenomena as diverse as spinning gymnasts, blood flow, and sound waves. Understanding many-particle systems requires connecting macroscopic properties (e.g., temperature and pressure) to microscopic dynamics (collisions of particles). Laws of thermodynamics provide understanding of real-world phenomena such as energy conversion and performance limits of heat engines. Everyday examples are analyzed using tools of algebra and trigonometry. Problem-solving skills are developed, including verifying that derived results satisfy criteria for correctness, such as dimensional consistency and expected behavior in limiting cases. Physical understanding fostered by peer interaction and demonstrations in lecture, and interactive group problem solving in discussion sections. Prerequisite: high school algebra and trigonometry; calculus not required.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PHYSICS 21S: Mechanics, Fluids, and Heat with Laboratory

How are the motions of objects and the behavior of fluids and gases determined by the laws of physics? Students learn to describe the motion of objects (kinematics) and understand why objects move as they do (dynamics). Emphasis on how Newton's three laws of motion are applied to solids, liquids, and gases to describe phenomena as diverse as spinning gymnasts, blood flow, and sound waves. Understanding many-particle systems requires connecting macroscopic properties (e.g., temperature and pressure) to microscopic dynamics (collisions of particles). Laws of thermodynamics provide understanding of real-world phenomena such as energy conversion and performance limits of heat engines. Everyday examples are analyzed using tools of algebra and trigonometry. Problem-solving skills are developed, including verifying that derived results satisfy criteria for correctness, such as dimensional consistency and expected behavior in limiting cases. Physical understanding fostered by peer interaction and demonstrations in lecture, and interactive group problem solving in discussion sections. Labs are an integrated part of the summer course. Prerequisite: high school algebra and trigonometry; calculus not required.
Terms: Sum | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Betre, K. (PI)

PHYSICS 23: Electricity, Magnetism, and Optics

How are electric and magnetic fields generated by static and moving charges, and what are their applications? How is light related to electromagnetic waves? Students learn to represent and analyze electric and magnetic fields to understand electric circuits, motors, and generators. The wave nature of light is used to explain interference, diffraction, and polarization phenomena. Geometric optics is employed to understand how lenses and mirrors form images. These descriptions are combined to understand the workings and limitations of optical systems such as the eye, corrective vision, cameras, telescopes, and microscopes. Discussions based on the language of algebra and trigonometry. Physical understanding fostered by peer interaction and demonstrations in lecture, and interactive group problem solving in discussion sections. Prerequisite: PHYSICS 21 or PHYSICS 21S.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Linde, A. (PI)

PHYSICS 23S: Electricity, Magnetism, and Optics with Laboratory

How are electric and magnetic fields generated by static and moving charges, and what are their applications? How is light related to electromagnetic waves? Students learn to represent and analyze electric and magnetic fields to understand electric circuits, motors, and generators. The wave nature of light is used to explain interference, diffraction, and polarization phenomena. Geometric optics is employed to understand how lenses and mirrors form images. These descriptions are combined to understand the workings and limitations of optical systems such as the eye, corrective vision, cameras, telescopes, and microscopes. Discussions based on the language of algebra and trigonometry. Physical understanding fostered by peer interaction and demonstrations in lecture, and interactive group problem solving in discussion sections. Labs are an integrated part of the summer courses. Prerequisite: PHYSICS 21 or PHYSICS 21S.
Terms: Sum | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Wiser, T. (PI)

PHYSICS 25: Modern Physics

How do the discoveries since the dawn of the 20th century impact our understanding of 21st-century physics? This course introduces the foundations of modern physics: Einstein's theory of special relativity and quantum mechanics. Combining the language of physics with tools from algebra and trigonometry, students gain insights into how the universe works on both the smallest and largest scales. Topics may include atomic, molecular, and laser physics; semiconductors; elementary particles and the fundamental forces; nuclear physics (fission, fusion, and radioactivity); astrophysics and cosmology (the contents and evolution of the universe). Emphasis on applications of modern physics in everyday life, progress made in our understanding of the universe, and open questions that are the subject of active research. Physical understanding fostered by peer interaction and demonstrations in lecture, and interactive group problem solving in discussion sections. Prerequisite: PHYSICS 23 or PHYSICS 23S.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Irwin, K. (PI)

PHYSICS 41: Mechanics

How are motions of objects in the physical world determined by laws of physics? Students learn to describe the motion of objects (kinematics) and then understand why motions have the form they do (dynamics). Emphasis on how the important physical principles in mechanics, such as conservation of momentum and energy for translational and rotational motion, follow from just three laws of nature: Newton's laws of motion. Distinction made between fundamental laws of nature and empirical rules that are useful approximations for more complex physics. Problems drawn from examples of mechanics in everyday life. Skills developed in verifying that derived results satisfy criteria for correctness, such as dimensional consistency and expected behavior in limiting cases. Discussions based on language of mathematics, particularly vector representations and operations, and calculus. Physical understanding fostered by peer interaction and demonstrations in lecture, and discussion sections based on interactive group problem solving. Prerequisite: High school physics or concurrent enrollment in PHYSICS 41A. MATH 20 or MATH 51 or CME 100 or equivalent. Minimum corequisite: MATH 21 or equivalent.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Lee, Y. (PI)

PHYSICS 43: Electricity and Magnetism

What is electricity? What is magnetism? How are they related? How do these phenomena manifest themselves in the physical world? The theory of electricity and magnetism, as codified by Maxwell's equations, underlies much of the observable universe. Students develop both conceptual and quantitative knowledge of this theory. Topics include: electrostatics; magnetostatics; simple AC and DC circuits involving capacitors, inductors, and resistors; integral form of Maxwell's equations; electromagnetic waves. Principles illustrated in the context of modern technologies. Broader scientific questions addressed include: How do physical theories evolve? What is the interplay between basic physical theories and associated technologies? Discussions based on the language of mathematics, particularly differential and integral calculus, and vectors. Physical understanding fostered by peer interaction and demonstrations in lecture, and discussion sections based on interactive group problem solving. Prerequisite: PHYSICS 41 or equivalent. MATH 21 or MATH 51 or CME 100 or equivalent. Recommended corequisite: MATH 52 or CME 102.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Kasevich, M. (PI)

PHYSICS 45: Light and Heat

What is temperature? How do the elementary processes of mechanics, which are intrinsically reversible, result in phenomena that are clearly irreversible when applied to a very large number of particles, the ultimate example being life? In thermodynamics, students discover that the approach of classical mechanics is not sufficient to deal with the extremely large number of particles present in a macroscopic amount of gas. The paradigm of thermodynamics leads to a deeper understanding of real-world phenomena such as energy conversion and the performance limits of thermal engines. In optics, students see how a geometrical approach allows the design of optical systems based on reflection and refraction, while the wave nature of light leads to interference phenomena. The two approaches come together in understanding the diffraction limit of microscopes and telescopes. Discussions based on the language of mathematics, particularly calculus. Physical understanding fostered by peer interaction and demonstrations in lecture, and discussion sections based on interactive group problem solving. Prerequisite: PHYSICS 41 or equivalent. MATH 21 or MATH 51 or CME 100 or equivalent.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PHYSICS 50: Observational Astronomy Laboratory

Introduction to observational astronomy emphasizing the use of optical telescopes. Observations of stars, nebulae, and galaxies in laboratory sessions with telescopes at the Stanford Student Observatory. Meets at the observatory one evening per week from dusk until well after dark, in addition to day-time lectures each week. No previous physics required. Limited enrollment.
Terms: Aut, Sum | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Bailey, V. (PI); Kuo, C. (PI)

PHYSICS 61: Mechanics and Special Relativity

(First in a three-part advanced freshman physics series: PHYSICS 61, PHYSICS 63, PHYSICS 65.) This course covers Einstein's special theory of relativity and Newtonian mechanics at a level appropriate for students with a strong high school mathematics and physics background, who are contemplating a major in Physics or Engineering Physics, or are interested in a rigorous treatment of physics. Postulates of special relativity, simultaneity, time dilation, length contraction, the Lorentz transformation, causality, and relativistic mechanics. Central forces, contact forces, linear restoring forces. Momentum transport, work, energy, collisions. Angular momentum, torque, moment of inertia in three dimensions. Damped and forced harmonic oscillators. Uses the language of vectors and multivariable calculus. Recommended prerequisites: Mastery of mechanics at the level of AP Physics C and AP Calculus BC or equivalent. Corequisite: MATH 51 or MATH 61CM or MATH 61DM.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-FR, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PHYSICS 63: Electricity, Magnetism, and Waves

(Second in a three-part advanced freshman physics series: PHYSICS 61, PHYSICS 63, PHYSICS 65.) This course covers the foundations of electricity and magnetism for students with a strong high school mathematics and physics background, who are contemplating a major in Physics or Engineering Physics, or are interested in a rigorous treatment of physics. Electricity, magnetism, and waves with some description of optics. Electrostatics and Gauss' law. Electric potential, electric field, conductors, image charges. Electric currents, DC circuits. Moving charges, magnetic field, Ampere's law. Solenoids, transformers, induction, AC circuits, resonance. Relativistic point of view for moving charges. Displacement current, Maxwell's equations. Electromagnetic waves, dielectrics. Diffraction, interference, refraction, reflection, polarization. Prerequisite: PHYSICS 61 and MATH 51 or MATH 61CM or MATH 61DM. Pre- or corequisite: MATH 52 or MATH 62CM or MATH 62DM.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-FR, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Graham, P. (PI)

PHYSICS 65: Quantum and Thermal Physics

(Third in a three-part advanced freshman physics series: PHYSICS 61, PHYSICS 63, PHYSICS 65.) This course introduces the foundations of quantum and statistical mechanics for students with a strong high school mathematics and physics background, who are contemplating a major in Physics or Engineering Physics, or are interested in a rigorous treatment of physics. Quantum mechanics: atoms, electrons, nuclei. Quantization of light, Planck's constant. Photoelectric effect, Compton and Bragg scattering. Bohr model, atomic spectra. Matter waves, wave packets, interference. Fourier analysis and transforms, Heisenberg uncertainty relationships. Schrödinger equation, eigenfunctions and eigenvalues. Particle-in-a-box, simple harmonic oscillator, barrier penetration, tunneling, WKB and approximate solutions. Time-dependent and multi-dimensional solution concepts. Coulomb potential and hydrogen atom structure. Thermodynamics and statistical mechanics: ideal gas, equipartition, heat capacity. Probability, counting states, entropy, equilibrium, chemical potential. Laws of thermodynamics. Cycles, heat engines, free energy. Partition function, Boltzmann statistics, Maxwell speed distribution, ideal gas in a box, Einstein model. Quantum statistical mechanics: classical vs. quantum distribution functions, fermions vs. bosons. Prerequisites: PHYSICS 61 & PHYSICS 63. Pre- or corequisite: MATH 53 or MATH 63CM or MATH 63DM.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-FR, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Gratta, G. (PI)

PHYSICS 70: Foundations of Modern Physics

Required for Physics or Engineering Physics majors who completed the PHYSICS 40 series. Introduction to special relativity: reference frames, Michelson-Morley experiment. Postulates of relativity, simultaneity, time dilation. Length contraction, the Lorentz transformation, causality. Doppler effect. Relativistic mechanics and mass, energy, momentum relations. Introduction to quantum physics: atoms, electrons, nuclei. Quantization of light, Planck constant. Photoelectric effect, Compton and Bragg scattering. Bohr model, atomic spectra. Matter waves, wave packets, interference. Fourier analysis and transforms, Heisenberg uncertainty relationships. Schrödinger equation, eigenfunctions and eigenvalues. Particle-in-a-box, simple harmonic oscillator, barrier penetration, tunneling, WKB and approximate solutions. Time-dependent and multi-dimensional solution concepts. Coulomb potential and hydrogen atom structure. Prerequisites: PHYSICS 41, PHYSICS 43. Pre or corequisite: PHYSICS 45. Recommended: prior or concurrent registration in MATH 53.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PHYSICS 83N: Physics in the 21st Century

Preference to freshmen. Current topics at the frontier of modern physics. This course provides an in-depth examination of two of the biggest physics discoveries of the 21st century: that of the Higgs boson and Dark Energy. Through studying these discoveries we will explore the big questions driving modern particle physics, the study of nature's most fundamental pieces, and cosmology, the study of the evolution and nature of the universe. Questions such as: What is the universe made of? What are the most fundamental particles and how do they interact with each other? What can we learn about the history of the universe and what does it tell us about it's future? We will learn about the tools scientists use to study these questions such as the Large Hadron Collider and the Hubble Space Telescope. We will also learn to convey these complex topics in engaging and diverse terms to the general public through writing and reading assignments, oral presentations, and multimedia projects. The syllabus includes a tour of SLAC, the site of many major 20th century particle discoveries, and a virtual visit of the control room of the ATLAS experiment at CERN amongst other activities. No prior knowledge of physics is necessary; all voices are welcome to contribute to the discussion about these big ideas. Learning Goals: By the end of the quarter you will be able to explain the major questions that drive particle physics and cosmology to your friends and peers. You will understand how scientists study the impossibly small and impossibly large and be able to convey this knowledge in clear and concise terms.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Tompkins, L. (PI)

PHYSICS 100: Introduction to Observational Astrophysics

Designed for undergraduate physics majors but open to all students with a calculus-based physics background and some laboratory and coding experience. Students make and analyze observations using the telescopes at the Stanford Student Observatory. Topics covered include navigating the night sky, the physics of stars and galaxies, telescope instrumentation and operation, imaging and spectroscopic techniques, quantitative error analysis, and effective scientific communication. The course concludes with an independent project where student teams propose and execute an observational astronomy project of their choosing, using techniques learned in class to gather and analyze their data, and presenting their findings in the forms of professional-style oral presentations and research papers. Enrollment by permission. To get a permission number please complete form: http://web.stanford.edu/~elva/physics100prelim.fbn If you have not heard from us by the beginning of class, please come to the first class session.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Allen, S. (PI)

PHYSICS 105: Intermediate Physics Laboratory I: Analog Electronics

Analog electronics including Ohm's law, passive circuits and transistor and op amp circuits, emphasizing practical circuit design skills to prepare undergraduates for laboratory research. Short design project. Minimal use of math and physics, no electronics experience assumed beyond introductory physics. Prerequisite: PHYSICS 43 or PHYSICS 63.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Fox, J. (PI)

PHYSICS 110: Advanced Mechanics (PHYSICS 210)

Lagrangian and Hamiltonian mechanics. Principle of least action, Euler-Lagrange equations. Small oscillations and beyond. Symmetries, canonical transformations, Hamilton-Jacobi theory, action-angle variables. Introduction to classical field theory. Selected other topics, including nonlinear dynamical systems, attractors, chaotic motion. Undergraduates register for Physics 110 (4 units). Graduates register for Physics 210 (3 units). Prerequisites: MATH 131P or PHYSICS 111, and PHYSICS 112 or MATH elective 104 or higher. Recommended prerequisite: PHYSICS 130.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-FR, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Hartnoll, S. (PI)

PHYSICS 112: Mathematical Methods for Physics

This course will cover methods of mathematical physics that are pertinent to physics. Topics include: Complex analysis, group theory, calculus of variations. Emphasis will be on in-depth coverage of selected topics. Prerequisites: MATH 50 or 60 series
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-FR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Raghu, S. (PI)

PHYSICS 113: Computational Physics

Numerical methods for solving problems in mechanics, astrophysics, electromagnetism, quantum mechanics, and statistical mechanics. Methods include numerical integration; solutions of ordinary and partial differential equations; solutions of the diffusion equation, Laplace's equation and Poisson's equation with various methods; statistical methods including Monte Carlo techniques; matrix methods and eigenvalue problems. Short introduction to Python, used for class examples; class projects may be programmed in any language such as C, python or julia. No Prerequisites. Previous programming experience not required.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-FR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Cabrera, B. (PI)

PHYSICS 120: Intermediate Electricity and Magnetism I

Vector analysis. Electrostatic fields, including boundary-value problems and multipole expansion. Dielectrics, static and variable magnetic fields, magnetic materials. Maxwell's equations. Prerequisites: PHYSICS 43 or PHYS 63; MATH 52 and MATH 53. Pre- or corequisite: PHYS 111, MATH 131P or MATH 173. Recommended corequisite: PHYS 112.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-FR, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Hogan, J. (PI)

PHYSICS 130: Quantum Mechanics I

The origins of quantum mechanics and wave mechanics. Schrödinger equation and solutions for one-dimensional systems. Commutation relations. Generalized uncertainty principle. Time-energy uncertainty principle. Separation of variables and solutions for three-dimensional systems; application to hydrogen atom. Spherically symmetric potentials and angular momentum eigenstates. Spin angular momentum. Addition of angular momentum. Prerequisites: PHYSICS 65 or PHYSICS 70 and PHYSICS 111 or MATH 131P or MATH 173. MATH 173 can be taken concurrently. Pre- or corequisites: PHYSICS 120.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-FR, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Burchat, P. (PI)

PSYC 135: Sleep and Dreams (PSYC 235)

The course is designed to impart essential knowledge of the neuroscience of sleep and covers how sleep affects our daily lives-- both physical and mental functions of our well-being. The course covers the science of sleep, dreams, and the pathophysiology of highly prevalent sleep disorders such as sleep deprivation, biological rhythms, and focuses on the physiology of non-REM and REM sleep. Course content empowers students to make educated decisions concerning sleep and alertness for the rest of their lives and shapes students' attitudes about the importance of sleep. Learning about the science of sleep provides tangible reason to respect sleep as a member of what we term the triumvirate of health: good nutrition, physical fitness, and healthy sleep. Undergraduates must enroll in PSYC 135, while graduate students should enroll in PSYC 235
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

PSYCH 30: Introduction to Perception

Behavioral and neural aspects of perception focusing on visual and auditory perception. Topics include: scientific methods for studying perception, anatomy and physiology of the visual and auditiory systems, color vision, depth perception, motion perception, stereopsis, visual recognition, pitch and loudness perception, speech perception, and reorganization of the visual system in the blind.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SI, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Grill-Spector, K. (PI)

PSYCH 50: Introduction to Cognitive Neuroscience

Survey of topics relating brain activity to cognitive processes and behavior. The course begins with an overview of neurophysiology and techniques to measure brain activity. We then discuss perceptual and motor processes before investigating neural responses related to attention, memory, and cognitive control. The course concludes with a discussion of brain processes related to reward, decision making, and social cognition.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SI, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Gardner, J. (PI)

PSYCH 120: Cellular Neuroscience: Cell Signaling and Behavior (BIO 153)

Neural interactions underlying behavior. Prerequisites: PSYCH 1 or basic biology.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Wine, J. (PI); Tong, L. (TA)

PUBLPOL 122: Biosecurity and Bioterrorism Response (BIOE 122, EMED 122, EMED 222, PUBLPOL 222)

Overview of the most pressing biosecurity issues facing the world today. Guest lecturers have included former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice, former Special Assistant on BioSecurity to Presidents Clinton and Bush Jr. Dr. Ken Bernard, Chief Medical Officer of the Homeland Security Department Dr. Alex Garza, eminent scientists, innovators and physicians in the field, and leaders of relevant technology companies. How well the US and global healthcare systems are prepared to withstand a pandemic or a bioterrorism attack, how the medical/healthcare field, government, and the technology sectors are involved in biosecurity and pandemic or bioterrorism response and how they interface, the rise of synthetic biology with its promises and threats, global bio-surveillance, making the medical diagnosis, isolation, containment, hospital surge capacity, stockpiling and distribution of countermeasures, food and agriculture biosecurity, new promising technologies for detection of bio-threats and countermeasures. Open to medical, graduate, and undergraduate students. No prior background in biology necessary. 4 units for twice weekly attendance (Mon. and Wed.); additional 1 unit for writing a research paper for 5 units total maximum.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Trounce, M. (PI)

STATS 101: Data Science 101

http://web.stanford.edu/class/stats101/ . This course will provide a hands-on introduction to statistics and data science. Students will engage with the fundamental ideas in inferential and computational thinking. Each week, we will explore a core topic comprising three lectures and two labs (a module), in which students will manipulate real-world data and learn about statistical and computational tools. Students will engage in statistical computing and visualization with current data analytic software (Jupyter, R). The objectives of this course are to have students (1) be able to connect data to underlying phenomena and to think critically about conclusions drawn from data analysis, and (2) be knowledgeable about programming abstractions so that they can later design their own computational inferential procedures. No programming or statistical background is assumed. Freshmen and sophomores interested in data science, computing and statistics are encouraged to attend. Open to graduates as well.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-AQR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

UGXFER GER2A2: GER 2A SUBSTITUTION (2ND)

Units: 0 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Internal Transfer
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