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TAPS 1: Introduction to Theater and Performance Studies

TAPS 1 provides you with a solid foundation in Theater Studies and traces the development of the burgeoning field of Performance Studies. We will consider a range of canonical plays and emerging performance forms, and explore how performance can also function as an interpretive framework for analyzing a broad range of social behaviors, sites, and institutions. Through a series of close readings, discussions, written and practical exercises, and viewings of live performance, this course will help you achieve a richer understanding of the performances you see and the performances you may wish to make. This quarter, TAPS 1 will serve as the platform for the Theater & Performance Studies professionalization series. We will host several guest speakers (directors, actors, playwrights, and dance practitioners), who will give you some real connections in the theater world and will provide you with information and skills to help you build a career in the arts.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Robinson, A. (PI)

TAPS 11Q: Art in the Metropolis (ARTSINST 11Q)

This seminar is offered in conjunction with the annual "Arts Immersion" trip to New York that takes place over the spring break and is organized by the Stanford Arts Institute (SAI). Participation in the trip is a requirement for taking part in the seminar (and vice versa). The trip is designed to provide a group of students with the opportunity to immerse themselves in the cultural life of New York City guided by faculty and the SAI programming director. Students will experience a broad range and variety of art forms (visual arts, theater, opera, dance, etc.) and will meet with prominent arts administrators and practitioners, some of whom are Stanford alumni. For further details and updates about the trip, see http://arts.stanford.edu.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Phelan, P. (PI)

TAPS 20N: Prisons and Performance

Preference to Freshmen. This seminar starts with the unlikely question of what can the performing arts, particularly dance and theater, illuminate about the situation of mass incarceration in America. Part seminar, part immersive context building, students will read and view a cross-section of dance and theater works where the subject, performers, choreographers or authors, belong to part of the 2.4 million people currently behind bars in US prisons. Class includes conversations with formerly incarcerated youth, prison staff, juvenile justice lawyers and artists working in juvenile and adult prisons as well as those who are part of the 7.3 million people currently on parole or probation. Using performance as our lens we will investigate the unique kinds of understanding the arts make possible as well as the growing use of theater and dance to affect social change and personal transformation among prison inmates. Class trips will include visits to locked facilities and meetings with artists and inmates working behind bars.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Ross, J. (PI)

TAPS 22: Scene Work

For actors who complete substantial scene work with graduate directors in the graduate workshop.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

TAPS 29: Theater Performance: Acting

Students cast in department productions receive credit for their participation as actors; 1-2 units for graduate directing workshop projects and 1-3 units for major productions (units determined by instructor). May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

TAPS 39: Theater Crew

For students working backstage, on run crew, or in the theater shops on TAPS department productions. Night and weekend time required. Pre-approval from Jane Casamajor (janecasa@stanford.edu) is required for enrollment.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

TAPS 60: Singing: How it's done, how to learn to do it, and how to work with people who do it. (MUSIC 60)

A weekly lecture course for singers, pianists, directors, conductors, and anyone who is interested in the art and craft of the voice. Students will learn about the vocal instrument, how to use it efficiently and keep it healthy, how to lead and participate in vocal productions and ensembles of all periods and styles. Ability to sing and/or read music is not required; this is not a voice class. Required readings. Taught by Music Department Faculty; coordinated by Wendy Hillhouse.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Hillhouse, W. (PI)

TAPS 101P: Theater and Performance Making (TAPS 371P)

A creative workshop offering a range of generative exercises and techniques in order to devise, compose and perform original works. Students will explore a variety of texts (plays, poems, short stories, paintings) and work with the body, object and site. nnStudents will be encouraged to think critically about various compositional themes and ideas including: the relationship between form and content, aesthetics, space, proximity, and audience. Students will work independently and collaboratively creating original performances.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

TAPS 103: Beginning Improvising

The improvisational theater techniques that teach spontaneity, cooperation, team building, and rapid problem solving, emphasizing common sense, attention to reality, and helping your partner. Based on TheatreSports by Keith Johnstone. Readings, papers, and attendance at performances of improvisational theater. Limited enrollment. Improv, Improvisation, creativity and creative expression. All who sign up are placed on a waitlist. Official enrollment will be determined after the first day of class. Attendance at the first class session is mandatory to be considered for enrollment in the course.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

TAPS 104: Intermediate Improvisation

This class is the continued study of improvisational theater with a focus on stage skills, short and long form performance formats, and offstage applications of collaborative creativity. It is open to any students who have taken TAPS 103 or have previous onstage improv experience AND consent of the instructor. May be repeat for credit.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Klein, D. (PI)

TAPS 120B: Acting II: Advanced Acting

Learn how to expand character work, beyond what is immediately familiar. Continuing basic practices from the first part of the sequence, in this quarter they will look beyond the strictly contemporary, and may begin to approach roles drawn from more challenging dramatic texts. This might include plays chosen from mid-century American classics, World Theater, or other works with specific historic or cultural requirements. Actors begin to learn how a performing artist researches and how that research can be used to enrich and deepen performance. Prerequisite: 120A or consent of instructor. Priority given to TAPS majors and minors.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Hunt, S. (PI)

TAPS 124D: Acting for Non-Majors

Formerly TAPS 20. Creative play, ensemble work in a supportive environment. Designed for the student to experience a range of new creative skills, from group improvisation to partner work. Introductory work on freeing the natural voice and physical relaxation. Emphasis on rediscovering imaginative and creative impulses. Movement improvisation, listening exercises, and theater games release the energy, playfulness and willingness to take risks that is the essence of free and powerful performance. Course culminates with work on dramatic text.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE, way_ce | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Amarotico, K. (PI)

TAPS 132: Costume Design

This course introduces the goals, directives and techniques of designing costumes for performance. From the first reading of the script to opening night, all aspects will be covered including director/designer relationships, design approach, research, rendering, fabric selection, procurement or construction of costumes, fittings and final dress rehearsals. Each student will work on, or be assigned one main project of their choice. This class can coincide or be taken in advance of a student¿s involvement in a campus show, utilizing the campus project as their main project in the class. Smaller exercises will be given throughout the quarter to emphasize principles and invigorate design discussions. All students will be required to attend the performances of their peers¿ projects. One field trip to a professional theater may be planned.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Strayer, C. (PI)

TAPS 134: Stage Management Project

For students stage managing a production in the Department of Theater and Performance Studies.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 3-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Kumaran, L. (PI)

TAPS 140: Introduction to Projects in Theatrical Production

A seminar course for students performing significant production work on Theater and Performance Studies Department or other Stanford University student theater projects. Students serving as producers, directors, designers or stage managers, who wish mentorship and credit for their production work sign up for this course and contact the instructor, Laxmi Kumaran. nPrerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Kumaran, L. (PI)

TAPS 151T: Great Books: Dramatic Traditions (TAPS 351)

The most influential and enduring texts in the dramatic canon from Sophocles to Shakespeare, Chekhov to Soyinka. Their historical and geopolitical contexts. Questions about the power dynamics involved in the formation of canons. This course counts as a Writing in the Major course for TAPS in 2016-17.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Menon, J. (PI)

TAPS 155: Social Sculpture (ARTSTUDI 155)

This course investigates the immediacy of the body as material and sculpture in order to investigate private and social spaces. Actions are often used to understand or question the function and psychological aspects of a space and are documented for the perpetuation of these ideas. Throughout the quarter we will investigate the body as material and develop site specific performances enacted for: Private/Domestic and Public Space; Constructed Space & Physical Space; ecological systems; and generate both Individual & Collaborative based Actions, Interventions, & Events."
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Yanez, V. (PI)

TAPS 175T: Collaborative Theater-Making (TAPS 275T)

Instructor Young Jean Lee is a playwright and director who will have two plays premiering on Broadway in 2018-2019. In this workshop, students will collaborate on the creation of one of these plays, which explores the intersection of class and race. The point of this class will be to replicate as closely as possible Lee's process for developing a new play in a professional setting. Students will "learn by doing" as they serve as actors, assistant directors, and dramaturgs in the same way that her actual actors, assistant directors, and dramaturgs would do. Please note that this is not designed to be an acting class with lots of fun moving around. There is no guarantee that every student will have a chance to perform. Also, Lee's new play development process is challenging, slow, and often requires sitting around a table having gruelingly intense conversations for hours at a time. This class is designed to teach students skills they need to succeed in a professional theater environment. Please contact the instructor ASAP at yjl@stanford.edu for an application, which will be be due on March 1, with notifications being sent out on March 15. If you find out about this class after the application deadline and send the instructor an email asking her to allow you to apply late, you must present a convincing explanation for why an exception should be made in your case. Nobody who misses the first class will be permitted to take the course.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Lee, Y. (PI)

TAPS 177: Dramatic Writing: The Fundamentals (CSRE 177, FEMGEN 177, TAPS 277)

Course introduces students to the basic elements of playwriting and creative experimentation for the stage. Topics include: character development, conflict and plot construction, staging and setting, and play structure. Script analysis of works by contemporary playwrights may include: Marsha Norman, Patrick Shanley, August Wilson, Suzan-Lori Parks, Paula Vogel, Octavio Solis and others. Table readings of one-act length work required by quarter's end.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Freed, A. (PI)

TAPS 178D: Editing a Full-Length Play (TAPS 278D)

To participate in this workshop, students must bring in a draft of a full length straight play for revision, which was written in part one of this course, WRITING A FULL-LENGTH PLAY. In conjunction with a variety of other editing techniques, students will focus on editing in collaboration with others. They will learn how to edit in response to hearing their plays read aloud; how to give and solicit the most useful kinds of feedback; how to cope with harsh criticism; what to do when people are offended by what they have written; how to know which notes to pay attention to and which notes to ignore; and how to let go of ideas and text that are not working. Other topics to be discussed: getting your work produced vs. self-producing; directing your own work vs. working with a director; and starting your own theater company. Enrollment for this course is closed.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Lee, Y. (PI)

TAPS 190: Special Research

Individual project on the work of a playwright, period, or genre. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

TAPS 191: Independent Study

Individual research with a faculty member. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-18 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

TAPS 192: Nitery Board Practicum (TAPS 292)

Credit given for student board members of the Experimental Nitery Studio. Undergraduate students should enroll in TAPS 192. Ph.D. students should enroll in TAPS 292.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

TAPS 200: Senior Project

All TAPS Majors must complete a Senior Project that represents significant work in any area of theater and/or performance. The project must be an original contribution and can consist of any of the following: devising a performance, choreographing a dance, stage managing a production, designing a large theater work, performing a major role, writing a play, directing a show, or researching and writing a senior essay. Work for this project normally begins in Spring Quarter of the junior year and must be completed by the end of the senior year. Students receive credit for senior projects through TAPS 200. A minimum of 4 units is required, but additional units are available for larger projects. Students pursuing senior projects must submit a two-page proposal to a faculty advisor of their choice, which must be approved by the Undergraduate Advisor and the department faculty no later than the end of Spring Quarter of the junior year.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 2-9 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

TAPS 202: Honors Thesis

An advanced written project to fulfill the requirements for the Honors degree in TAPS. There are two ways to undertake an honors thesis. The first is to write a 40-50 page essay, which presents research on an important issue or subject of the student¿s choice. The second option is a 30-page essay that takes the student¿s capstone project as a case study and critically analyzes the creative work. Students are expected to work consistently throughout the year with their advisor, whom they identify at the time of application. Advisors can be selected from Academic Council faculty or artists-in-residence. Students should enroll in TAPS 202 each quarter during the senior year (1 unit in Autumn; 1 unit in Winter; 2 units in Spring).
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

TAPS 231: Advanced Stage Lighting Design

Individually structured class in lighting mechanics and design through experimentation, discussions, and written reports. Prerequisite: 131 or consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

TAPS 232: Advanced Costume Design

Individually structured tutorial for costume designers. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: 132 or consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

TAPS 233: Advanced Scene Design

Individually structured workshop. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: 133 or consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

TAPS 234: Advanced Stage Management Project

For students stage managing a Department of Drama production. Prerequisite: 134.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 2-9 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Kumaran, L. (PI)

TAPS 275T: Collaborative Theater-Making (TAPS 175T)

Instructor Young Jean Lee is a playwright and director who will have two plays premiering on Broadway in 2018-2019. In this workshop, students will collaborate on the creation of one of these plays, which explores the intersection of class and race. The point of this class will be to replicate as closely as possible Lee's process for developing a new play in a professional setting. Students will "learn by doing" as they serve as actors, assistant directors, and dramaturgs in the same way that her actual actors, assistant directors, and dramaturgs would do. Please note that this is not designed to be an acting class with lots of fun moving around. There is no guarantee that every student will have a chance to perform. Also, Lee's new play development process is challenging, slow, and often requires sitting around a table having gruelingly intense conversations for hours at a time. This class is designed to teach students skills they need to succeed in a professional theater environment. Please contact the instructor ASAP at yjl@stanford.edu for an application, which will be be due on March 1, with notifications being sent out on March 15. If you find out about this class after the application deadline and send the instructor an email asking her to allow you to apply late, you must present a convincing explanation for why an exception should be made in your case. Nobody who misses the first class will be permitted to take the course.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Lee, Y. (PI)

TAPS 277: Dramatic Writing: The Fundamentals (CSRE 177, FEMGEN 177, TAPS 177)

Course introduces students to the basic elements of playwriting and creative experimentation for the stage. Topics include: character development, conflict and plot construction, staging and setting, and play structure. Script analysis of works by contemporary playwrights may include: Marsha Norman, Patrick Shanley, August Wilson, Suzan-Lori Parks, Paula Vogel, Octavio Solis and others. Table readings of one-act length work required by quarter's end.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Freed, A. (PI)

TAPS 278D: Editing a Full-Length Play (TAPS 178D)

To participate in this workshop, students must bring in a draft of a full length straight play for revision, which was written in part one of this course, WRITING A FULL-LENGTH PLAY. In conjunction with a variety of other editing techniques, students will focus on editing in collaboration with others. They will learn how to edit in response to hearing their plays read aloud; how to give and solicit the most useful kinds of feedback; how to cope with harsh criticism; what to do when people are offended by what they have written; how to know which notes to pay attention to and which notes to ignore; and how to let go of ideas and text that are not working. Other topics to be discussed: getting your work produced vs. self-producing; directing your own work vs. working with a director; and starting your own theater company. Enrollment for this course is closed.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Lee, Y. (PI)

TAPS 290: Special Research

Individual project on the work of a playwright, period, or genre.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

TAPS 292: Nitery Board Practicum (TAPS 192)

Credit given for student board members of the Experimental Nitery Studio. Undergraduate students should enroll in TAPS 192. Ph.D. students should enroll in TAPS 292.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

TAPS 314: Performing Identities (FEMGEN 314)

This course examines claims and counter-claims of identity, a heated political and cultural concept over the past few decades. We will consider the ways in which theories of performance have offered generative discursive frameworks for the study of identities, variously shaped by vectors of race, gender, sexuality, religion, class, nation, ethnicity, among others. How is identity as a social category different from identity as a unique and personal attribute of selfhood? Throughout the course we will focus on the inter-locking ways in which certain dimensions of identity become salient at particular historical conjunctures. In addition, we will consider the complex discourses of identity within transnational and historical frameworks. Readings include Robin Bernstein, Ann Pellegrini, Tavia Nyong¿o, Jose Munoz, Michael Taussig, Wendy Brown, Talal Asad, Jasbir Puar, among others.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Brody, J. (PI)

TAPS 335: Introduction to Graduate Production

This course introduces first-year TAPS PhD student to the TAPS production process and resources. Meetings will be scheduled ad hoc.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Sunderman, E. (PI)

TAPS 351: Great Books: Dramatic Traditions (TAPS 151T)

The most influential and enduring texts in the dramatic canon from Sophocles to Shakespeare, Chekhov to Soyinka. Their historical and geopolitical contexts. Questions about the power dynamics involved in the formation of canons. This course counts as a Writing in the Major course for TAPS in 2016-17.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Menon, J. (PI)

TAPS 356T: Intro to Psychoanalysis as a Critical Method (ENGLISH 356T)

Primary reading in Freud, Lacan, Laplanche, Irigaray and Kristeva. Secondary readings in film theory (Mulvey to Silverman), art history (Bryson, Bersani) and poststructuralism (Derrida, Foucault, Butler).
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Phelan, P. (PI)

TAPS 371P: Theater and Performance Making (TAPS 101P)

A creative workshop offering a range of generative exercises and techniques in order to devise, compose and perform original works. Students will explore a variety of texts (plays, poems, short stories, paintings) and work with the body, object and site. nnStudents will be encouraged to think critically about various compositional themes and ideas including: the relationship between form and content, aesthetics, space, proximity, and audience. Students will work independently and collaboratively creating original performances.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

TAPS 377: Graduate Directors' Staged Reading Project

Presentation of a new or newly adapted work for the stage, in a mode employed in professional theater for the development of new plays. Two to four rehearsals. Public performance.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

TAPS 390: Directed Reading

Students may take directing reading only with the permission of their dissertation advisor. Might be repeatable for credit twice for 6 units total.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-6 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

TAPS 802: TGR Dissertation

(Staff)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 0 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: TGR
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