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CEE 126B: Stanford Sustainable Living Lab II

This course introduces students to the concepts of sustainability economics, system optimization, and life cycle costing. In essence, students will be building the "business case" for various proposed sustainability efforts tied to an on-campus system. Examples of such systems are on an on-campus dormitory (.e.g Roble Hall), service provider (e.g. Axe and Palm Restaurant), or infrastructure system (e.g. campus water system). Students interested in CEE 126B do not need to have taken CEE 126B as a prerequisite. This course is an approved equivalent for CEE 146A/246A.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Lepech, M. (PI)

CEE 177S: Design for a Sustainable World (CEE 277S)

Technology-based problems faced by developing communities worldwide. Student groups partner with organizations abroad to work on concept, feasibility, design, implementation, and evaluation phases of various projects. Past projects include a water and health initiative, a green school design, seismic safety, and medical device. Admission based on written application and interview. See http://esw.stanford.edu for application. (Staff)
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Mitch, W. (PI)

CEE 177X: Current Topics in Sustainable Engineering (CEE 277X)

This course is the first half of a two quarter, project-based design course that addresses the cultural, political, organizational, technical, and business issues at the heart of implementing sustainable engineering projects in the developing world. Students will be placed into one of three project teams and tackle a real-world design challenge in partnership with social entrepreneurs and NGOs. In CEE 177X/277X, students will gain the background skills and context necessary to effectively design engineering projects in developing nations. (Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center). Instructor consent required.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Mitch, W. (PI)

CEE 224X: Sustainable Urban Systems Project (CEE 124X)

Sustainable Urban Systems (SUS) Project is a project-based learning experience being piloted for an upcoming new SUS M.S. Program within CEE. Students are placed in small interdisciplinary teams (engineers and non-engineers, undergraduate and graduate level) to work on complex design, engineering, and policy problems presented by external partners in a real urban setting. Multiple projects are offered throughout the academic year and may span multiple quarters. Students are expected to interact with professionals and community stakeholders, conduct independent team work outside of class sessions, and submit deliverables over a series of milestones. To view project descriptions and apply, visit http://sus.stanford.edu/courses/.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CEE 224Y: Sustainable Urban Systems Project (CEE 124Y)

Sustainable Urban Systems (SUS) Project is a project-based learning experience being piloted for an upcoming new SUS M.S. Program within CEE. Students are placed in small interdisciplinary teams (engineers and non-engineers, undergraduate and graduate level) to work on complex design, engineering, and policy problems presented by external partners in a real urban setting. Multiple projects are offered throughout the academic year and may span multiple quarters. Students are expected to interact with professionals and community stakeholders, conduct independent team work outside of class sessions, and submit deliverables over a series of milestones. To view project descriptions and apply, visit http://sus.stanford.edu/courses/.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CEE 224Z: Sustainable Urban Systems Project (CEE 124Z)

Sustainable Urban Systems (SUS) Project is a project-based learning experience being piloted for an upcoming new SUS M.S. Program within CEE. Students are placed in small interdisciplinary teams (engineers and non-engineers, undergraduate and graduate level) to work on complex design, engineering, and policy problems presented by external partners in a real urban setting. Multiple projects are offered throughout the academic year and may span multiple quarters. Students are expected to interact with professionals and community stakeholders, conduct independent team work outside of class sessions, and submit deliverables over a series of milestones. To view project descriptions and apply, visit http://sus.stanford.edu/courses/.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CEE 277S: Design for a Sustainable World (CEE 177S)

Technology-based problems faced by developing communities worldwide. Student groups partner with organizations abroad to work on concept, feasibility, design, implementation, and evaluation phases of various projects. Past projects include a water and health initiative, a green school design, seismic safety, and medical device. Admission based on written application and interview. See http://esw.stanford.edu for application. (Staff)
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Mitch, W. (PI)

CEE 277X: Current Topics in Sustainable Engineering (CEE 177X)

This course is the first half of a two quarter, project-based design course that addresses the cultural, political, organizational, technical, and business issues at the heart of implementing sustainable engineering projects in the developing world. Students will be placed into one of three project teams and tackle a real-world design challenge in partnership with social entrepreneurs and NGOs. In CEE 177X/277X, students will gain the background skills and context necessary to effectively design engineering projects in developing nations. (Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center). Instructor consent required.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Mitch, W. (PI)

CS 50: Using Tech for Good

Students in the class will work in small teams to implement high-impact projects for partner organizations. Taught by the CS+Social Good team, the aim of the class is to empower you to leverage technology for social good by inspiring action, facilitating collaboration, and forging pathways towards global change. Recommended: CS 106B, CS 42 or 142. Class is open to students of all years.May be repeat for credit
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Cain, J. (PI); Chopra, M. (PI)

CS 51: CS + Social Good Studio: Building Social Impact Projects for Change

Get real-world experience launching and developing your own social impact projects! Students will work in small teams to develop high-impact projects around problem domains provided by partner organizations, under the guidance and support of design/technical coaches from industry and nonprofit domain experts. The class aims to provide an outlet, along with the resources, for students to create social change through CS, while providing students with experience engaging in the full product development cycle on real-world projects. Prerequisite: CS 147, equivalent experience, or consent of instructors.
Terms: Win | Units: 2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

CS 377E: Designing Solutions to Global Grand Challenges

In this course we creatively apply information technologies to collectively attack Global Grand Challenges (e.g., global warming, rising healthcare costs and declining access, and ensuring quality education for all). Interdisciplinary student teams will carry out need-finding within a target domain, followed by brainstorming to propose a quarter long project. Teams will spend the rest of the quarter applying user-centered design methods to rapidly iterate through design, prototyping, and testing of their solutions. This course will interweave a weekly lecture with a weekly studio session where students apply the techniques hands-on in a small-scale, supportive environment.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Landay, J. (PI)

EE 46: Engineering For Good: Save the World and Have Fun Doing It

Projects that provide immediate and positive impact on the world. Focus is on global health by learning from experts in this field. Students work on real-world projects with help from members of NGOs and social entrepreneurial companies as part of the hand-on learning experience. Prerequisite: ENGR 40 or EE 122A or CS 106B or consent of instructor.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGR 110: Perspectives in Assistive Technology (ENGR 110) (ENGR 210)

Seminar and student project course. Explores the medical, social, ethical, and technical challenges surrounding the design, development, and use of technologies that improve the lives of people with disabilities and older adults. Guest lecturers include engineers, clinicians, and individuals with disabilities. Field trips to local facilities, an assistive technology faire, and a film screening. Students from any discipline are welcome to enroll. 3 units for students (juniors, seniors, and graduate students preferred) who pursue a team-based assistive technology project with a community partner - enrollment limited to 24. 1 unit for seminar attendance only (CR/NC) or individual project (letter grade). Total enrollment limited to classroom capacity of 50. Projects can be continued as independent study in Spring Quarter. See http://engr110.stanford.edu/. Designated a Cardinal Course by the Haas Center for Public Service.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Jaffe, D. (PI)

ENGR 119: Community Engagement Preparation Seminar (ENGR 219)

This seminar is designed for engineering students who have already committed to an experiential learning program working directly with a community partner on a project of mutual benefit. This seminar is targeted at students participating in the Summer Service Learning Program offered through Stanford¿s Global Engineering Program.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Credit/No Credit

ENGR 210: Perspectives in Assistive Technology (ENGR 110) (ENGR 110)

Seminar and student project course. Explores the medical, social, ethical, and technical challenges surrounding the design, development, and use of technologies that improve the lives of people with disabilities and older adults. Guest lecturers include engineers, clinicians, and individuals with disabilities. Field trips to local facilities, an assistive technology faire, and a film screening. Students from any discipline are welcome to enroll. 3 units for students (juniors, seniors, and graduate students preferred) who pursue a team-based assistive technology project with a community partner - enrollment limited to 24. 1 unit for seminar attendance only (CR/NC) or individual project (letter grade). Total enrollment limited to classroom capacity of 50. Projects can be continued as independent study in Spring Quarter. See http://engr110.stanford.edu/. Designated a Cardinal Course by the Haas Center for Public Service.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Jaffe, D. (PI)

ENGR 219: Community Engagement Preparation Seminar (ENGR 119)

This seminar is designed for engineering students who have already committed to an experiential learning program working directly with a community partner on a project of mutual benefit. This seminar is targeted at students participating in the Summer Service Learning Program offered through Stanford¿s Global Engineering Program.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Credit/No Credit

ME 105: Designing for Impact

This course will introduce the design thinking process and skills, and explore unique challenges of solving problems and initiating action for public good. Design skills such as need-finding, insight development, and prototyping will be learned through project work, with a particular emphasis on the elements required to be effective in the social sector. Prerequisite: ME101.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ME 177: Global Engineers' Education

A project based course for those who would like to use their engineering backgrounds to address real world challenges faced by underserved communities globally. In direct collaboration with an underserved community from a rural village in India, students will develop engineering solutions to the challenge of sanitation and hygiene. Focus will be on working with the community rather than for them. Concepts covered will include designing with what designers care about at the center, articulating and realizing individual and community aspirations, ethics of engaging with underserved communities, and methodology of working sustainably with an underserved community.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Hariharan, B. (PI)

MS&E 108: Senior Project

Restricted to MS&E majors in their senior year. Students carry out a major project in groups of four, applying techniques and concepts learned in the major. Project work includes problem identification and definition, data collection and synthesis, modeling, development of feasible solutions, and presentation of results. Service Learning Course (certified by Haas Center). Satisfies the WIM requirement for MS&E majors.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

MS&E 297: "Hacking for Defense": Solving National Security issues with the Lean Launchpad

In a crisis, national security initiatives move at the speed of a startup yet in peacetime they default to decades-long acquisition and procurement cycles. Startups operate with continual speed and urgency 24/7. Over the last few years they¿ve learned how to be not only fast, but extremely efficient with resources and time using lean startup methodologies. In this class student teams will take actual national security problems and learn how to apply ¿lean startup¿ principles, ("business model canvas," "customer development," and "agile engineering¿) to discover and validate customer needs and to continually build iterative prototypes to test whether they understood the problem and solution. Teams take a hands-on approach requiring close engagement with actual military, Department of Defense and other government agency end-users. Team applications required in February. Limited enrollment. Course builds on concepts introduced in MS&E 477.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

MS&E 330: Law, Order & Algorithms (SOC 279)

Data and algorithms are rapidly transforming law enforcement and criminal justice, including how police officers are deployed, how discrimination is detected, and how sentencing, probation, and parole terms are set. Modern computational and statistical methods offer the promise of greater efficiency, equity, and transparency, but their use also raises complex legal, social, and ethical questions. In this course, we analyze recent court decisions, discuss methods from machine learning and game theory, and examine the often subtle relationship between law, public policy, and statistics. The class is centered around several data-intensive projects in criminal justice that students work on in interdisciplinary teams. Students work closely with criminal justice agencies to carry out these projects, with the goal of producing research that impacts policy. Students with a background in statistics, computer science, law, and/or public policy are encouraged to participate. Enrollment is limited, and project teams will be selected during the first week of class.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Goel, S. (PI)

PUBLPOL 147: Ending Poverty with Technology (SOC 157)

There are growing worries that new technologies may eliminate work, increase inequality, and create a large dependent class subsisting on transfers. But can technology instead be turned against itself and used to end poverty? This class explores the sources of domestic poverty and then examines how new technologies might be developed to eliminate poverty completely. We first survey existing poverty-reducing products and then attempt to imagine new products that might end poverty by equalizing access to information, reducing transaction costs, or equalizing access to training. In a follow-up class in the spring quarter, students who choose to continue will select the most promising ideas, continue to develop them, and begin the design task within Stanford¿s new Poverty and Technology Lab.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Grusky, D. (PI)

PUBLPOL 148: Ending Poverty with Technology: A Practicum. (SOC 158)

Will robots, automation, and technology eliminate work and create a large poverty-sticken dependent class? Or will they eliminate poverty, free us from the tyranny of work, and usher in a new society defined by leisure and creative pursuits? This two-quarter class is dedicated to exploring new theories about poverty while at the same time incubating applied technology solutions. The first quarter is devoted to examining the theory of technology-based solutions to poverty, and the second quarter is devoted to planning a viable technology-based product that will reduce poverty. This product may then be built in a follow-up Using Tech for Good (Computer Science 50) class in the first quarter of 2018 (but class participants are not required to take that follow-up class). The course is premised on the view that innovative solutions to poverty will be based on new conversations and an authentic collaboration between Silicon Valley and leaders from education, government, and low-income communities
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

SOC 157: Ending Poverty with Technology (PUBLPOL 147)

There are growing worries that new technologies may eliminate work, increase inequality, and create a large dependent class subsisting on transfers. But can technology instead be turned against itself and used to end poverty? This class explores the sources of domestic poverty and then examines how new technologies might be developed to eliminate poverty completely. We first survey existing poverty-reducing products and then attempt to imagine new products that might end poverty by equalizing access to information, reducing transaction costs, or equalizing access to training. In a follow-up class in the spring quarter, students who choose to continue will select the most promising ideas, continue to develop them, and begin the design task within Stanford¿s new Poverty and Technology Lab.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Grusky, D. (PI)

SOC 158: Ending Poverty with Technology: A Practicum. (PUBLPOL 148)

Will robots, automation, and technology eliminate work and create a large poverty-sticken dependent class? Or will they eliminate poverty, free us from the tyranny of work, and usher in a new society defined by leisure and creative pursuits? This two-quarter class is dedicated to exploring new theories about poverty while at the same time incubating applied technology solutions. The first quarter is devoted to examining the theory of technology-based solutions to poverty, and the second quarter is devoted to planning a viable technology-based product that will reduce poverty. This product may then be built in a follow-up Using Tech for Good (Computer Science 50) class in the first quarter of 2018 (but class participants are not required to take that follow-up class). The course is premised on the view that innovative solutions to poverty will be based on new conversations and an authentic collaboration between Silicon Valley and leaders from education, government, and low-income communities
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
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