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AA 100: Introduction to Aeronautics and Astronautics

This class introduces the basics of aeronautics and astronautics through applied physics, hands-on activities, and real world examples. The principles of fluid flow, flight, and propulsion for aircraft will be illustrated, including the creation of lift and drag, aerodynamic performance including takeoff, climb, range, and landing. The principles of orbits, maneuvers, space environment, and propulsion for spacecraft will be illustrated. Students will be exposed to the history and challenges of aeronautics and astronautics.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

AA 115N: The Global Positioning System: Where on Earth are We, and What Time is It?

Preference to freshmen. Why people want to know where they are: answers include cross-Pacific trips of Polynesians, missile guidance, and distraught callers. How people determine where they are: navigation technology from dead-reckoning, sextants, and satellite navigation (GPS). Hands-on experience. How GPS works; when it does not work; possibilities for improving performance.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-AQR | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Enge, P. (PI)

AA 116Q: Electric Automobiles and Aircraft

Transportation accounts for nearly one-third of American energy use and greenhouse gas emissions and three-quarters of American oil consumption. It has crucial impacts on climate change, air pollution, resource depletion, and national security. Students wishing to address these issues reconsider how we move, finding sustainable transportation solutions. An introduction to the issue, covering the past and present of transportation and its impacts; examining alternative fuel proposals; and digging deeper into the most promising option: battery electric vehicles. Energy requirements of air, ground, and maritime transportation; design of electric motors, power control systems, drive trains, and batteries; and technologies for generating renewable energy. Two opportunities for hands-on experiences with electric cars. Prerequisites: Introduction to calculus and Physics AP or elementary mechanics.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ANTHRO 98B: Digital Methods in Archaeology (ANTHRO 298B, ARCHLGY 98B)

This is a course on digital technologies in archaeology used for documentation, visualization, and analysis of archaeological spaces and objects. Emphasizes hands-on approaches to image manipulation, virtual reality, GIS, CAD, and photogrammetry modeling methods.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

APPPHYS 77N: Functional Materials and Devices

Preference to freshmen. Exploration via case studies how functional materials have been developed and incorporated into modern devices. Particular emphasis is on magnetic and dielectric materials and devices. Recommended: high school physics course including electricity and magnetism.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Suzuki, Y. (PI)

APPPHYS 79Q: Energy Options for the 21st Century

Preference to sophomores.. Choices for meeting the future energy needs of the U.S. and the world. Basic physics of energy sources, technologies that might be employed, and related public policy issues. Trade-offs and societal impacts of different energy sources. Policy options for making rational choices for a sustainable world energy economy.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Fox, J. (PI)

ARCHLGY 98B: Digital Methods in Archaeology (ANTHRO 98B, ANTHRO 298B)

This is a course on digital technologies in archaeology used for documentation, visualization, and analysis of archaeological spaces and objects. Emphasizes hands-on approaches to image manipulation, virtual reality, GIS, CAD, and photogrammetry modeling methods.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

BIOE 10N: Form and Function of Animal Skeletons (ME 10N)

Preference to freshmen. The biomechanics and mechanobiology of the musculoskeletal system in human beings and other vertebrates on the level of the whole organism, organ systems, tissues, and cell biology. Field trips to labs.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

BIOE 80: Introduction to Bioengineering (Engineering Living Matter) (ENGR 80)

Students completing BIOE.80 should have a working understanding for how to approach the systematic engineering of living systems to benefit all people and the planet. Our main goals are (1) to help students learn ways of thinking about engineering living matter and (2) to empower students to explore the broader ramifications of engineering life. Specific concepts and skills covered include but are not limited to: capacities of natural life on Earth; scope of the existing human-directed bioeconomy; deconstructing complicated problems; reaction & diffusion systems; microbial human anatomy; conceptualizing the engineering of biology; how atoms can be organized to make molecules; how to print DNA from scratch; programming genetic sensors, logic, & actuators; biology beyond molecules (photons, electrons, etc.); what constraints limit what life can do?; what will be the major health challenges in 2030?; how does what we want shape bioengineering?; who should choose and realize various competing bioengineering futures?
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-FR | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CEE 31: Accessing Architecture Through Drawing

Preference to Architectural Design and CEE majors; others by consent of instructor. Drawing architecture to probe the intricacies and subtleties that characterize contemporary buildings. How to dissect buildings and appreciate the formal elements of a building, including scale, shape, proportion, colors and materials, and the problem solving reflected in the design. Students construct conventional architectural drawings, such as plans, elevations, and perspectives. Limited enrollment.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Wood, E. (PI); Lin, D. (GP)

CEE 31Q: Accessing Architecture Through Drawing

Preference to sophomores. Drawing architecture provides a deeper understanding of the intricacies and subtleties that characterize contemporary buildings. How to dissect buildings and appreciate the formal elements of a building, including scale, shape, proportion, colors and materials, and the problem solving reflected in the design. Students construct conventional architectural drawings, such as plans, elevations, and perspectives. Limited enrollment.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Barton, J. (PI); Lin, D. (GP)

CEE 70: Environmental Science and Technology (ENGR 90)

Introduction to environmental quality and the technical background necessary for understanding environmental issues, controlling environmental degradation, and preserving air and water quality. Material balance concepts for tracking substances in the environmental and engineering systems.
Terms: Win, Sum | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-AQR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Kopperud, R. (PI)

CEE 70N: Water, Public Health, and Engineering

Preference to frosh. Linkages between water, wastewater and public health, with an emphasis on engineering interventions. Topics include the history of water and wastewater infrastructure development in the U.S. and Europe; evolution of epidemiological approaches for water-related health challenges; biological and chemical contaminants in water and wastewater and their management; and current trends and challenges in access to water and sanitation around the world. Identifying ways in which freshwater contributes to human health; exposure routes for water- and sanitation-illness. Classifying illnesses by pathogen type and their geographic distribution. Identifying the health and economic consequences of water- and sanitation-related illnesses; costs and benefits of curative and preventative interventions. Interpreting data related to epidemiological and environmental concepts. No previous experience in engineering is required.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CEE 100: Managing Sustainable Building Projects

Managing the life cycle of buildings from the owner, designer, and contractor perspectives emphasizing sustainability goals; methods to define, communicate, coordinate, and manage multidisciplinary project objectives including scope, quality, life cycle cost and value, schedule, safety, energy, and social concerns; roles, responsibilities, and risks for project participants; virtual design and construction methods for product, organization, and process modeling; lifecycle assessment methods; individual writing assignment related to a real world project.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Fischer, M. (PI)

CEE 101A: Mechanics of Materials

Introduction to beam and column theory. Normal stress and strain in beams under various loading conditions; shear stress and shear flow; deflections of determinate and indeterminate beams; analysis of column buckling; structural loads in design; strength and serviceability criteria. Lab experiments. Prerequisites: ENGR 14.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Linder, C. (PI)

CEE 101B: Mechanics of Fluids

Physical properties of fluids and their effect on flow behavior; equations of motion for incompressible ideal flow, including the special case of hydrostatics; continuity, energy, and momentum principles; control volume analysis; laminar and turbulent flows; internal and external flows in specific engineering applications including pipes and open channels; elements of boundary-layer theory. The Tuesday lectures, which are preparation for the labs, will start at 12:30pm. Lab experiments will illustrate conservation principles and flows of real fluids, analysis of errors and modeling of simple fluid systems. Students seeking to take this course without the laboratory will need to enroll in CEE 162A but must get permission first from the instructor. Prerequisites: E14, Physics 41, Math 51, or CME 100.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Fong, D. (PI)

CEE 101C: Geotechnical Engineering

Introduction to the principles of soil mechanics. Soil classification, shear strength and stress-strain behavior of soils, consolidation theory, analysis and design of earth retaining structures, introduction to shallow and deep foundation design, slope stability. Lab projects. Prerequisite: ENGR 14. Recommended: 101A.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Borja, R. (PI)

CEE 107A: Understanding Energy (CEE 207A, EARTHSYS 103)

Energy is a fundamental driver of human development and opportunity. At the same time, our energy system has significant consequences for our society, political system, economy, and environment. For example, energy production and use is the number one source of greenhouse gas emissions. In taking this course, students will not only understand the fundamentals of each energy resource -- including significance and potential, conversion processes and technologies, drivers and barriers, policy and regulation, and social, economic, and environmental impacts -- students will also be able to put this in the context of the broader energy system and think critically about how and why society has chosen particular energy resources. Both depletable and renewable energy resources are covered, including oil, natural gas, coal, nuclear, biomass and biofuel, hydroelectric, wind, solar thermal and photovoltaics (PV), geothermal, and ocean energy, with cross-cutting topics including electricity, storage, climate change, sustainability, green buildings, energy efficiency, transportation, and the developing world. The course is 4 units, which includes lecture and in-class discussion, readings and videos, assignments, and two off-site field trips. Enroll for 5 units to also attend the Workshop, an interactive discussion section on cross-cutting topics that meets once per week for 80 minutes (timing TBD based on student schedules). The 3-unit option requires instructor approval - please contact Diana Ginnebaugh. Website: http://web.stanford.edu/class/cee207a/ Course was formerly called Energy Resources.nPrerequisites: Algebra. May not be taken for credit by students who have completed CEE 107S.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CEE 156: Building Systems (CEE 256)

HVAC, lighting, and envelope systems for commercial and institutional buildings, with a focus on energy efficient design. Knowledge and skills required in the development of low-energy buildings that provide high quality environment for occupants.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Kolderup, E. (PI)

CEE 162E: Rivers, Streams, and Canals (CEE 262E)

Formerly CEE 161A/264A. Introduction to the movement of water through natural and engineered channels, streams, and rivers. Basic equations and theory (mass, momentum, and energy equations) for steady and unsteady descriptions of the flow. Application of theory to the design of flood- control and canal systems. Flow controls such as weirs and sluice gates; gradually varied flow; Saint-Venant equations and flood waves; and method of characteristics. Open channel flow laboratory experiments: controls such as weirs and gates, gradually varied flow, and waves. Limited enrollment in lab section. Prerequisite: CEE 101B or CEE 162A.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Koseff, J. (PI)

CEE 166A: Watersheds and Wetlands (CEE 266A)

Introduction to the occurrence and movement of water in the natural environment and its role in creating and maintaining terrestrial, wetland, and aquatic habitat. Hydrologic processes, including precipitation, evaporation, transpiration, snowmelt, infiltration, subsurface flow, runoff, and streamflow. Rivers and lakes, springs and swamps. Emphasis is on observation and measurement, data analysis, modeling, and prediction. Prerequisite: CEE 101B or CEE 162A or equivalent. (Freyberg)
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CEE 166B: Floods and Droughts, Dams and Aqueducts (CEE 266B)

Sociotechnical systems associated with human use of water as a resource and the hazards posed by too much or too little water. Potable and non-potable water use and conservation. Irrigation, hydroelectric power generation, rural and urban water supply systems, storm water management, flood damage mitigation, and water law and institutions. Emphasis is on engineering design. Prerequisite: 166A or equivalent. (Freyberg)
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CEE 171: Environmental Planning Methods

Intended primarily for juniors and seniors; first year graduate students welcome. Course introduces key environmental policy design and implementation concepts and provides opportunities to work with a range of environmental planning methods. Environmental laws and regulations (e.g., US Clean Water Act and the US National Environmental Policy Act) are examined. Course demonstrates how firms have gone beyond regulatory compliance and introduced environmental sustainability issues into core business strategies. Course uses a simulated negotiation of a financial penalty between a student team representing the US EPA (and other government agencies) and a team representing a firm that is out of compliance with Clean Water Act regulations. Professionals with experience in such negotiations provide coaching for student teams. Prerequisites: MATH 51. Recommended: 70.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CEE 172: Air Quality Management

Quantitative introduction to the engineering methods used to study and seek solutions to current air quality problems. Topics: global atmospheric changes, urban sources of air pollution, indoor air quality problems, design and efficiencies of pollution control devices, and engineering strategies for managing air quality. Prerequisites: 70, MATH 51.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Kopperud, R. (PI)

CEE 176A: Energy Efficient Buildings

Quantitative evaluation of technologies and techniques for reducing energy demand of residential-scale buildings. Heating and cooling load calculations, financial analysis, passive-solar design techniques, water heating systems, photovoltaic system sizing for net-zero-energy all-electric homes. Offered for 3 or 4 units; the 4-unit option includes a lab.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Masters, G. (PI)

CEE 176B: Electric Power: Renewables and Efficiency

This course introduces analysis, sizing and performance estimations (electrical and financial) of renewable energy systems on both sides of the electric meter with an emphasis on photovoltaics and wind-power systems. Basic electric power generation, transmission and distribution, as well as distributed generation will be introduced. Optional Laboratory section for a 4th unit of credit.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CEE 177: Aquatic Chemistry and Biology

Introduction to chemical and biological processes in the aqueous environment. Basic aqueous equilibria; the structure, behavior, and fate of major classes of chemicals that dissolve in water; redox reactions; the biochemistry of aquatic microbial life; and biogeochemical processes that govern the fate of nutrients and metals in the environment and in engineered systems. Prerequisite: CHEM 31.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CEE 178: Introduction to Human Exposure Analysis (CEE 276)

(Graduate students register for 276.) Scientific and engineering issues involved in quantifying human exposure to toxic chemicals in the environment. Pollutant behavior, inhalation exposure, dermal exposure, and assessment tools. Overview of the complexities, uncertainties, and physical, chemical, and biological issues relevant to risk assessment. Lab projects. Recommended: MATH 51. Apply at first class for admission.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Kopperud, R. (PI)

CEE 180: Structural Analysis

Analysis of beams, trusses, frames; method of indeterminate analysis by consistent displacement, least work, superposition equations, moment distribution. Introduction to matrix methods and computer methods of structural analysis. Prerequisite: 101A and ENGR 14.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CEE 181: Design of Steel Structures

Concepts of the design of steel structures with a load and resistance factor design (LRFD) approach; types of loading; structural systems; design of tension members, compression members, beams, beam-columns, and connections; and design of trusses and frames. Prerequisite: 180.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Baker, J. (PI)

CEE 182: Design of Reinforced Concrete Structures

Properties of concrete and reinforcing steel; behavior of structural elements subject to bending moments, shear forces, torsion, axial loads, and combined actions; design of beams, slabs, columns and footings; strength design and serviceability requirements; design of simple structural systems for buildings. Prerequisite: 180.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CHEMENG 20: Introduction to Chemical Engineering (ENGR 20)

Overview of chemical engineering through discussion and engineering analysis of physical and chemical processes. Topics: overall staged separations, material and energy balances, concepts of rate processes, energy and mass transport, and kinetics of chemical reactions. Applications of these concepts to areas of current technological importance: biotechnology, energy, production of chemicals, materials processing, and purification. Prerequisite: CHEM 31.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CHEMENG 25B: Biotechnology (ENGR 25B)

Biology and chemistry fundamentals, genetic engineering, cell culture, protein production, pharmaceuticals, genomics, viruses, gene therapy, evolution, immunology, antibodies, vaccines, transgenic animals, cloning, stem cells, intellectual property, governmental regulations, and ethics. Prerequisites: CHEM 31 and MATH 20 or equivalent courage.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CHEMENG 25E: Energy: Chemical Transformations for Production, Storage, and Use (ENGR 25E)

An introduction and overview to the challenges and opportunities of energy supply and consumption. Emphasis on energy technologies where chemistry and engineering play key roles. Review of energy fundamentals along with historical energy perspectives and current energy production technologies. In depth analysises of solar thermal systems, biofuels, photovoltaics and electrochemical devices (batteries and fuel cells). Prerequisites: high school chemistry or equivalent.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CHEMENG 35N: Renewable Energy for a Sustainable World

Preference to freshmen. Organized to prepare a renewable energy plan for California. Energy concepts and quantitation approaches are learned, energy needs and natural resources are assessed, and renewable energy technologies are evaluated for economic performance and environmental impact. An investment plan is developed along with implementation and research recommendations. The same concepts are then applied to Mexico as a second model system.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CHEMENG 60Q: Environmental Regulation and Policy

Preference to sophomores. How environmental policy is formulated in the U.S. How and what type of scientific research is incorporated into decisions. How to determine acceptable risk, the public's right to know of chemical hazards, waste disposal and clean manufacturing, brownfield redevelopment, and new source review regulations. The proper use of science and engineering including media presentation and misrepresentation, public scientific and technical literacy, and emotional reactions. Alternative models to formulation of environmental policy. Political and economic forces, and stakeholder discussions.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-AQR | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Libicki, S. (PI)

CHEMENG 70Q: Masters of Disaster

Preference to sophomores. For students interested in science, engineering, politics, and the law. Learn from past disasters to avoid future ones. How disasters can be tracked to failures in the design process. The roles of engineers, artisans, politicians, lawyers, and scientists in the design of products. Failure as rooted in oversight in adhering to the design process. Student teams analyze real disasters and design new products presumably free from the potential for disastrous outcomes.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-AQR | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CHEMENG 80Q: Art, Chemistry, and Madness: The Science of Art Materials

Preference to sophomores. Chemistry of natural and synthetic pigments in five historical palettes: earth (paleolithic), classical (Egyptian, Greco-Roman), medieval European (Middle Ages), Renaissance (old masters), and synthetic (contemporary). Composite nature of paints using scanning electron microscopy images; analytical techniques used in art conservation, restoration, and determination of provenance; and inherent health hazards. Paintings as mechanical structures. Hands-on laboratory includes stretching canvas, applying gesso grounds, grinding pigments, preparing egg tempera paint, bamboo and quill pens, gilding and illumination, and papermaking.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CME 108: Introduction to Scientific Computing (MATH 114)

Introduction to Scientific Computing Numerical computation for mathematical, computational, physical sciences and engineering: error analysis, floating-point arithmetic, nonlinear equations, numerical solution of systems of algebraic equations, banded matrices, least squares, unconstrained optimization, polynomial interpolation, numerical differentiation and integration, numerical solution of ordinary differential equations, truncation error, numerical stability for time dependent problems and stiffness. Implementation of numerical methods in MATLAB programming assignments. Prerequisites: MATH 51, 52, 53; prior programming experience (MATLAB or other language at level of CS 106A or higher).
Terms: Win, Sum | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-FR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

COMM 113: Computational Methods in the Civic Sphere (COMM 213)

The widespread availability of public data provides a rich opportunity for those who can efficiently filter, interpret, and visualize information. Course develops necessary technical skills for data collection, analysis, and publication, including data mining and web visualization, with a focus on civic affairs and government accountability. Open to all majors and a range of technical skill levels. Involves tackling new tools and technical concepts in the pursuit of engaging, public-facing projects. (Graduate students enroll in 213). Prerequisite COMM 273D, CS 106A, or CS 106B.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Nguyen, D. (PI)

CS 54N: Great Ideas in Computer Science

Stanford Introductory Seminar. Preference to freshmen. Covers the intellectual tradition of computer science emphasizing ideas that reflect the most important milestones in the history of the discipline. No prior experience with programming is assumed. Topics include programming and problem solving; implementing computation in hardware; algorithmic efficiency; the theoretical limits of computation; cryptography and security; and the philosophy behind artificial intelligence.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CS 101: Introduction to Computing Principles

Introduces the essential ideas of computing: data representation, algorithms, programming "code", computer hardware, networking, security, and social issues. Students learn how computers work and what they can do through hands-on exercises. In particular, students will see the capabilities and weaknesses of computer systems so they are not mysterious or intimidating. Course features many small programming exercises, although no prior programming experience is assumed or required. CS101 is not a complete programming course such as CS106A. CS101 is effectively an alternative to CS105. A laptop computer is recommended for the in-class exercises.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-FR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CS 105: Introduction to Computers

For non-technical majors. What computers are and how they work. Practical experience in programming. Construction of computer programs and basic design techniques. A survey of Internet technology and the basics of computer hardware. Students in technical fields and students looking to acquire programming skills should take 106A or 106X. Students with prior computer science experience at the level of 106 or above require consent of instructor. Prerequisite: minimal math skills.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-FR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CS 106A: Programming Methodology (ENGR 70A)

Introduction to the engineering of computer applications emphasizing modern software engineering principles: object-oriented design, decomposition, encapsulation, abstraction, and testing. Emphasis is on good programming style and the built-in facilities of respective languages. No prior programming experience required. Summer quarter enrollment is limited. Alternative versions of CS106A are available which cover most of the same material but in different programming languages: Java [Fall, Win, Spr, or Sum qtr enroll in CS106A Section 1] Javascript [Fall qtr enroll in CS 106A Section 2] Python [Winter or Spring qtr enroll in CS 106A Section 3]
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-FR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CS 106B: Programming Abstractions (ENGR 70B)

Abstraction and its relation to programming. Software engineering principles of data abstraction and modularity. Object-oriented programming, fundamental data structures (such as stacks, queues, sets) and data-directed design. Recursion and recursive data structures (linked lists, trees, graphs). Introduction to time and space complexity analysis. Uses the programming language C++ covering its basic facilities. Prerequisite: 106A or equivalent. Summer quarter enrollment is limited.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-FR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CS 106X: Programming Abstractions (Accelerated) (ENGR 70X)

Intensive version of 106B for students with a strong programming background interested in a rigorous treatment of the topics at an accelerated pace. Additional advanced material and more challenging projects. Winter quarter assignments will be based in CS department research. Prerequisite: excellence in 106A or equivalent, or consent of instructor. Winter quarter enrollment limited to 30.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-FR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CS 107: Computer Organization and Systems

Introduction to the fundamental concepts of computer systems. Explores how computer systems execute programs and manipulate data, working from the C programming language down to the microprocessor. Topics covered include: the C programming language, data representation, machine-level code, computer arithmetic, elements of code compilation, memory organization and management, and performance evaluation and optimization. Prerequisites: 106B or X, or consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-FR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CS 108: Object-Oriented Systems Design

Software design and construction in the context of large OOP libraries. Taught in Java. Topics: OOP design, design patterns, testing, graphical user interface (GUI) OOP libraries, software engineering strategies, approaches to programming in teams. Prerequisite: 107.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CS 109: Introduction to Probability for Computer Scientists

Topics include: counting and combinatorics, random variables, conditional probability, independence, distributions, expectation, point estimation, and limit theorems. Applications of probability in computer science including machine learning and the use of probability in the analysis of algorithms. Prerequisites: 103, 106B or X, multivariate calculus at the level of MATH 51 or CME 100 or equivalent.
Terms: Aut, Spr, Sum | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-FR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CS 110: Principles of Computer Systems

Principles and practice of engineering of computer software and hardware systems. Topics include: techniques for controlling complexity; strong modularity using client-server design, virtual memory, and threads; networks; atomicity and coordination of parallel activities; security, and encryption; and performance optimizations. Prerequisite: 107.
Terms: Aut, Spr, Sum | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CS 140: Operating Systems and Systems Programming

Operating systems design and implementation. Basic structure; synchronization and communication mechanisms; implementation of processes, process management, scheduling, and protection; memory organization and management, including virtual memory; I/O device management, secondary storage, and file systems. Prerequisite: CS 110.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CS 143: Compilers

Principles and practices for design and implementation of compilers and interpreters. Topics: lexical analysis; parsing theory; symbol tables; type systems; scope; semantic analysis; intermediate representations; runtime environments; code generation; and basic program analysis and optimization. Students construct a compiler for a simple object-oriented language during course programming projects. Prerequisites: 103 or 103B, and 107.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CS 144: Introduction to Computer Networking

Principles and practice. Structure and components of computer networks, packet switching, layered architectures. Applications: web/http, voice-over-IP, p2p file sharing and socket programming. Reliable transport: TCP/IP, reliable transfer, flow control, and congestion control. The network layer: names and addresses, routing. Local area networks: ethernet and switches. Wireless networks and network security. Prerequisite: CS 110.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CS 145: Introduction to Databases

The course covers database design and the use of database management systems for applications. It includes extensive coverage of the relational model, relational algebra, and SQL.The course includes database design and relational design principles based on dependencies and normal forms. Many additional key database topics from the design and application-building perspective are also covered: indexes, views, transactions, authorization, integrity constraints, triggers, on-line analytical processing (OLAP), JSON, and emerging NoSQL systems. Class time will include guest speakers from industry and additional advanced topics as time and class interest permits. Prerequisites: 103 and 107 (or equivalent).
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CS 148: Introduction to Computer Graphics and Imaging

Introductory prerequisite course in the computer graphics sequence introducing students to the technical concepts behind creating synthetic computer generated images. Focuses on using OpenGL to create visual imagery, as well as an understanding of the underlying mathematical concepts including triangles, normals, interpolation, texture mapping, bump mapping, etc. Course will cover fundamental understanding of light and color, as well as how it impacts computer displays and printers. Class will discuss more thoroughly how light interacts with the environment, constructing engineering models such as the BRDF, plus various simplifications into more basic lighting and shading models. Also covers ray tracing technology for creating virtual images, while drawing parallels between ray tracers and real world cameras to illustrate various concepts. Anti-aliasing and acceleration structures are also discussed. The final class mini-project consists of building out a ray tracer to create visually compelling images. Starter codes and code bits will be provided to aid in development, but this class focuses on what you can do with the code as opposed to what the code itself looks like. Therefore grading is weighted toward in person "demos" of the code in action - creativity and the production of impressive visual imagery are highly encouraged. Prerequisites: CS 107, MATH 51.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CS 149: Parallel Computing

This course is an introduction to parallelism and parallel programming. Most new computer architectures are parallel; programming these machines requires knowledge of the basic issues of and techniques for writing parallel software. Topics: varieties of parallelism in current hardware (e.g., fast networks, multicore, accelerators such as GPUs, vector instruction sets), importance of locality, implicit vs. explicit parallelism, shared vs. non-shared memory, synchronization mechanisms (locking, atomicity, transactions, barriers), and parallel programming models (threads, data parallel/streaming, MapReduce, Apache Spark, SPMD, message passing, SIMT, transactions, and nested parallelism). Significant parallel programming assignments will be given as homework. The course is open to students who have completed the introductory CS course sequence through 110 and have taken CS 143.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CS 154: Introduction to Automata and Complexity Theory

This course provides a mathematical introduction to the following questions: What is computation? Given a computational model, what problems can we hope to solve in principle with this model? Besides those solvable in principle, what problems can we hope to efficiently solve? In many cases we can give completely rigorous answers; in other cases, these questions have become major open problems in computer science and mathematics. By the end of this course, students will be able to classify computational problems in terms of their computational complexity (Is the problem regular? Not regular? Decidable? Recognizable? Neither? Solvable in P? NP-complete? PSPACE-complete?, etc.). Students will gain a deeper appreciation for some of the fundamental issues in computing that are independent of trends of technology, such as the Church-Turing Thesis and the P versus NP problem. Prerequisites: CS 103 or 103B.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CS 155: Computer and Network Security

For seniors and first-year graduate students. Principles of computer systems security. Attack techniques and how to defend against them. Topics include: network attacks and defenses, operating system security, application security (web, apps, databases), malware, privacy, and security for mobile devices. Course projects focus on building reliable code. Prerequisite: 110. Recommended: basic Unix.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CS 157: Logic and Automated Reasoning

An elementary exposition from a computational point of view of propositional and predicate logic, axiomatic theories, and theories with equality and induction. Interpretations, models, validity, proof, strategies, and applications. Automated deduction: polarity, skolemization, unification, resolution, equality. Prerequisite: 103 or 103B.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CS 161: Design and Analysis of Algorithms

Worst and average case analysis. Recurrences and asymptotics. Efficient algorithms for sorting, searching, and selection. Data structures: binary search trees, heaps, hash tables. Algorithm design techniques: divide-and-conquer, dynamic programming, greedy algorithms, amortized analysis, randomization. Algorithms for fundamental graph problems: minimum-cost spanning tree, connected components, topological sort, and shortest paths. Possible additional topics: network flow, string searching. Prerequisite: 103 or 103B; 109 or STATS 116.
Terms: Aut, Win, Sum | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-FR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EARTHSYS 101: Energy and the Environment (ENERGY 101)

Energy use in modern society and the consequences of current and future energy use patterns. Case studies illustrate resource estimation, engineering analysis of energy systems, and options for managing carbon emissions. Focus is on energy definitions, use patterns, resource estimation, pollution. Recommended: MATH 21 or 42.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EARTHSYS 102: Fundamentals of Renewable Power (ENERGY 102)

Do you want a much better understanding of renewable power technologies? Did you know that wind and solar are the fastest growing forms of electricity generation? Are you interested in hearing about the most recent, and future, designs for green power? Do you want to understand what limits power extraction from renewable resources and how current designs could be improved? This course dives deep into these and related issues for wind, solar, biomass, geothermal, tidal and wave power technologies. We welcome all student, from non-majors to MBAs and grad students. If you are potentially interested in an energy or environmental related major, this course is particularly useful. Recommended: Math 21 or 42.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EARTHSYS 103: Understanding Energy (CEE 107A, CEE 207A)

Energy is a fundamental driver of human development and opportunity. At the same time, our energy system has significant consequences for our society, political system, economy, and environment. For example, energy production and use is the number one source of greenhouse gas emissions. In taking this course, students will not only understand the fundamentals of each energy resource -- including significance and potential, conversion processes and technologies, drivers and barriers, policy and regulation, and social, economic, and environmental impacts -- students will also be able to put this in the context of the broader energy system and think critically about how and why society has chosen particular energy resources. Both depletable and renewable energy resources are covered, including oil, natural gas, coal, nuclear, biomass and biofuel, hydroelectric, wind, solar thermal and photovoltaics (PV), geothermal, and ocean energy, with cross-cutting topics including electricity, storage, climate change, sustainability, green buildings, energy efficiency, transportation, and the developing world. The course is 4 units, which includes lecture and in-class discussion, readings and videos, assignments, and two off-site field trips. Enroll for 5 units to also attend the Workshop, an interactive discussion section on cross-cutting topics that meets once per week for 80 minutes (timing TBD based on student schedules). The 3-unit option requires instructor approval - please contact Diana Ginnebaugh. Website: http://web.stanford.edu/class/cee207a/ Course was formerly called Energy Resources.nPrerequisites: Algebra. May not be taken for credit by students who have completed CEE 107S.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EARTHSYS 113: Earthquakes and Volcanoes (GEOPHYS 90)

Is the "Big One" overdue in California? What kind of damage would that cause? What can we do to reduce the impact of such hazards in urban environments? Does "fracking" cause earthquakes and are we at risk? Is the United States vulnerable to a giant tsunami? The geologic record contains evidence of volcanic super eruptions throughout Earth's history. What causes these gigantic explosive eruptions, and can they be predicted in the future? This course will address these and related issues. For non-majors and potential Earth scientists. No prerequisites. More information at: https://stanford.box.com/s/zr8ar28efmuo5wtlj6gj2jbxle76r4lu
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EE 14N: Things about Stuff

Preference to freshmen. The stories behind disruptive inventions such as the telegraph, telephone, wireless, television, transistor, and chip are as important as the inventions themselves, for they elucidate broadly applicable scientific principles. Focus is on studying consumer devices; projects include building batteries, energy conversion devices and semiconductors from pocket change. Students may propose topics and projects of interest to them. The trajectory of the course is determined in large part by the students themselves.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Lee, T. (PI)

EE 15N: The Art and Science of Engineering Design

The goal of this seminar is to introduce freshmen to the design process associated with an engineering project. The seminar will consist of a series of lectures. The first part of each lecture will focus on the different design aspects of an engineering project, including formation of the design team, developing a project statement, generating design ideas and specifications, finalizing the design, and reporting the outcome. Students will form teams to follow these procedures in designing a term project of their choice over the quarter. The second part of each lecture will consist of outside speakers, including founders of some of the most exciting companies in Silicon Valley, who will share their experiences about engineering design. On-site visits to Silicon Valley companies to showcase their design processes will also be part of the course. The seminar serves three purposes: (1) it introduces students to the design process of turning an idea into a final design, (2) it presents the different functions that people play in a project, and (3) it gives students a chance to consider what role in a project would be best suited to their interests and skills.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

EE 17N: Engineering the Micro and Nano Worlds: From Chips to Genes

Preference to freshmen. The first part is hands-on micro- and nano-fabrication including the Stanford Nanofabrication Facility (SNF) and the Stanford Nanocharacterization Laboratory (SNL) and field trips to local companies and other research centers to illustrate the many applications; these include semiconductor integrated circuits ('chips'), DNA microarrays, microfluidic bio-sensors and microelectromechanical systems (MEMS). The second part is to create, design, propose and execute a project. Most of the grade will be based on the project. By the end of the course you will, of course, be able to read critically a New York Times article on nanotechnology. More importantly you will have experienced the challenge (and fun) of designing, carrying out and presenting your own experimental project. As a result you will be better equipped to choose your major. This course can complement (and differs from) the seminars offered by Profs Philip Wong and Hari Manoharan in that it emphasizes laboratory work and an experimental student-designed project. Prerequisites: high-school physics.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EE 21N: What is Nanotechnology?

Nanotechnology is an often used word and it means many things to different people. Scientists and Engineers have some notion of what nanotechnology is, societal perception may be entirely different. In this course, we start with the classic paper by Richard Feynman ("There's Plenty of Room at the Bottom"), which laid down the challenge to the nanotechnologists. Then we discuss two classic books that offer a glimpse of what nanotechnology is: Engines of Creation: The Coming Era of Nanotechnology by Eric Drexler, and Prey by Michael Crichton. Drexler's thesis sparked the imagination of what nano machinery might do, whereas Crichton's popular novel channeled the public's attention to this subject by portraying a disastrous scenario of a technology gone astray. We will use the scientific knowledge to analyze the assumptions and predictions of these classic works. We will draw upon the latest research advances to illustrate the possibilities and impossibilities of nanotechnology.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Wong, H. (PI)

EE 22N: Medical Imaging Systems

Preference to freshmen. The technology of major imaging modalities used for disease diagnosis: x-ray, ultrasound, and magnetic resonance; their history, societal impact, and clinical applications. Field trips to a medical center and an imaging research lab. Term paper and presentation. Prerequisites: high school physics and calculus.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EE 23N: Imaging: From the Atom to the Universe

Preference to freshmen. Forms of imaging including human and animal vision systems, atomic force microscope, microscope, digital camera, holography and three-dimensional imaging, telescope, synthetic aperture radar imaging, nuclear magnetic imaging, sonar and gravitational wave imaging, and the Hubble Space telescope. Physical principles and exposure to real imaging devices and systems.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

EE 42: Introduction to Electromagnetics and Its Applications (ENGR 42)

Electricity and magnetism and its essential role in modern electrical engineering devices and systems, such as sensors, displays, DVD players, and optical communication systems. The topics that will be covered include electrostatics, magnetostatics, Maxwell's equations, one-dimensional wave equation, electromagnetic waves, transmission lines, and one-dimensional resonators. Pre-requisites: MATH 42 or MATH 51 or CME 100 or equivalent.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

EE 60N: Man versus Nature: Coping with Disasters Using Space Technology (GEOPHYS 60N)

Preference to freshman. Natural hazards, earthquakes, volcanoes, floods, hurricanes, and fires, and how they affect people and society; great disasters such as asteroid impacts that periodically obliterate many species of life. Scientific issues, political and social consequences, costs of disaster mitigation, and how scientific knowledge affects policy. How spaceborne imaging technology makes it possible to respond quickly and mitigate consequences; how it is applied to natural disasters; and remote sensing data manipulation and analysis. GER:DB-EngrAppSci
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Zebker, H. (PI)

EE 65: Modern Physics for Engineers

This course introduces the core ideas of modern physics that enable applications ranging from solar energy and efficient lighting to the modern electronic and optical devices and nanotechnologies that sense, process, store, communicate and display all our information. Though the ideas have broad impact, the course is widely accessible to engineering and science students with only basic linear algebra and calculus through simple ordinary differential equations as mathematics background. Topics include the quantum mechanics of electrons and photons (Schrödinger's equation, atoms, electrons, energy levels and energy bands; absorption and emission of photons; quantum confinement in nanostructures), the statistical mechanics of particles (entropy, the Boltzmann factor, thermal distributions), the thermodynamics of light (thermal radiation, limits to light concentration, spontaneous and stimulated emission), and the physics of information (Maxwell¿s demon, reversibility, entropy and noise in physics and information theory). Pre-requisite: Physics 41. Pre- or co-requisite: Math 53 or CME 102.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

EE 101A: Circuits I

Introduction to circuit modeling and analysis. Topics include creating the models of typical components in electronic circuits and simplifying non-linear models for restricted ranges of operation (small signal model); and using network theory to solve linear and non-linear circuits under static and dynamic operations. Prerequisite: ENGR40 or ENGR40M is useful but not strictly required.
Terms: Win, Sum | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EE 101B: Circuits II

Continuation of EE101A. Introduction to circuit design for modern electronic systems. Modeling and analysis of analog gain stages, frequency response, feedback. Filtering and analog¿to¿digital conversion. Fundamentals of circuit simulation. Prerequisites: EE101A, EE102A. Recommended: CME102.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EE 102A: Signal Processing and Linear Systems I

Concepts and tools for continuous- and discrete-time signal and system analysis with applications in signal processing, communications, and control. Mathematical representation of signals and systems. Linearity and time invariance. System impulse and step responses. System frequency response. Frequency-domain representations: Fourier series and Fourier transforms. Filtering and signal distortion. Time/frequency sampling and interpolation. Continuous-discrete-time signal conversion and quantization. Discrete-time signal processing. Prerequisite: MATH 53 or CME 102.
Terms: Win, Sum | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-FR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EE 102B: Signal Processing and Linear Systems II

Continuation of EE 102A. Concepts and tools for continuous- and discrete-time signal and system analysis with applications in communications, signal processing and control. Analog and digital modulation and demodulation. Sampling, reconstruction, decimation and interpolation. Finite impulse response filter design. Discrete Fourier transforms, applications in convolution and spectral analysis. Laplace transforms, applications in circuits and feedback control. Z transforms, applications in infinite impulse response filter design. Prerequisite: EE 102A.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-FR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EE 108: Digital System Design

Digital circuit, logic, and system design. Digital representation of information. CMOS logic circuits. Combinational logic design. Logic building blocks, idioms, and structured design. Sequential logic design and timing analysis. Clocks and synchronization. Finite state machines. Microcode control. Digital system design. Control and datapath partitioning. Lab. *In Autumn, enrollment preference is given to EE majors. Any EE majors who must enroll in Autumn are invited to contact the instructor. Formerly EE 108A.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EE 114: Fundamentals of Analog Integrated Circuit Design (EE 214A)

Analysis and simulation of elementary transistor stages, current mirrors, supply- and temperature-independent bias, and reference circuits. Overview of integrated circuit technologies, circuit components, component variations and practical design paradigms. Differential circuits, frequency response, and feedback will also be covered. Performance evaluation using computer-aided design tools. Undergraduates must take EE 114 for 4 units. Prerequisite: 101B. GER:DB-EngrAppSci
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

EE 116: Semiconductor Devices for Energy and Electronics

The underpinnings of modern technology are the transistor (circuits), the capacitor (memory), and the solar cell (energy). EE 116 introduces the physics of their operation, their historical origins (including Nobel prize breakthroughs), and how they can be optimized for future applications. The class covers physical principles of semiconductors, including silicon and new material discoveries, quantum effects, band theory, operating principles, and device equations. Recommended (but not required) co-requisite: EE 65 or equivalent.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EE 134: Introduction to Photonics

Photonics, optical components, and fiber optics. Conceptual and mathematical tools for design and analysis of optical communication, sensor and imaging systems. Experimental characterization of semiconductor lasers, optical fibers, photodetectors, receiver circuitry, fiber optic links, optical amplifiers, and optical sensors. Class project on confocal microscopy or other method of sensing or analyzing biometric data. Laboratory experiments. Prerequisite: EE 102A and one of the following: EE 42, Physics 43, or Physics 63.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Bowden, A. (PI); Li, L. (TA)

EE 142: Engineering Electromagnetics

Introduction to electromagnetism and Maxwell's equations in static and dynamic regimes. Electrostatics and magnetostatics: Gauss's, Coulomb's, Faraday's, Ampere's, Biot-Savart's laws. Electric and magnetic potentials. Boundary conditions. Electric and magnetic field energy. Electrodynamics: Wave equation; Electromagnetic waves; Phasor form of Maxwell's equations.nSolution of the wave equation in 1D free space: Wavelength, wave-vector, forward and backward propagating plane waves.Poynting's theorem. Propagation in lossy media, skin depth. Reflection and refraction at planar boundaries, total internal reflection. Solutions of wave equation for various 1D-3D problems: Electromagnetic resonators, waveguides periodic media, transmission lines. Formerly EE 141. Pre-requisites: Phys 43 or EE 42, CME 100, CME 102 (recommended)
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-FR, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Fan, J. (PI); Phan, T. (TA)

EE 178: Probabilistic Systems Analysis

Introduction to probability and statistics and their role in modeling and analyzing real world phenomena. Events, sample space, and probability. Discrete random variables, probability mass functions, independence and conditional probability, expectation and conditional expectation. Continuous random variables, probability density functions, independence and expectation, derived densities. Transforms, moments, sums of independent random variables. Simple random processes. Limit theorems. Introduction to statistics: significance, estimation and detection. Prerequisites: basic calculus.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EE 180: Digital Systems Architecture

The design of processor-based digital systems. Instruction sets, addressing modes, data types. Assembly language programming, low-level data structures, introduction to operating systems and compilers. Processor microarchitecture, microprogramming, pipelining. Memory systems and caches. Input/output, interrupts, buses and DMA. System design implementation alternatives, software/hardware tradeoffs. Labs involve the design of processor subsystems and processor-based embedded systems. Formerly EE 108B. Prerequisite: CS107 (required) and EE108 (recommended but not required).
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENERGY 101: Energy and the Environment (EARTHSYS 101)

Energy use in modern society and the consequences of current and future energy use patterns. Case studies illustrate resource estimation, engineering analysis of energy systems, and options for managing carbon emissions. Focus is on energy definitions, use patterns, resource estimation, pollution. Recommended: MATH 21 or 42.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENERGY 102: Fundamentals of Renewable Power (EARTHSYS 102)

Do you want a much better understanding of renewable power technologies? Did you know that wind and solar are the fastest growing forms of electricity generation? Are you interested in hearing about the most recent, and future, designs for green power? Do you want to understand what limits power extraction from renewable resources and how current designs could be improved? This course dives deep into these and related issues for wind, solar, biomass, geothermal, tidal and wave power technologies. We welcome all student, from non-majors to MBAs and grad students. If you are potentially interested in an energy or environmental related major, this course is particularly useful. Recommended: Math 21 or 42.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENERGY 120: Fundamentals of Petroleum Engineering (ENGR 120)

Lectures, problems, field trip. Engineering topics in petroleum recovery; origin, discovery, and development of oil and gas. Chemical, physical, and thermodynamic properties of oil and natural gas. Material balance equations and reserve estimates using volumetric calculations. Gas laws. Single phase and multiphase flow through porous media.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-FR, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENERGY 121: Fundamentals of Multiphase Flow (ENERGY 221)

Multiphase flow in porous media. Wettability, capillary pressure, imbibition and drainage, Leverett J-function, transition zone, vertical equilibrium. Relative permeabilities, Darcy's law for multiphase flow, fractional flow equation, effects of gravity, Buckley-Leverett theory, recovery predictions, volumetric linear scaling, JBN and Jones-Rozelle determination of relative permeability. Frontal advance equation, Buckley-Leverett equation as frontal advance solution, tracers in multiphase flow, adsorption, three-phase relative permeabilities.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ENERGY 167: Engineering Valuation and Appraisal of Oil and Gas Wells, Facilities, and Properties (ENERGY 267)

Appraisal of development and remedial work on oil and gas wells; appraisal of producing properties; estimation of productive capacity, reserves; operating costs, depletion, and depreciation; value of future profits, taxation, fair market value; original or guided research problems on economic topics with report. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENERGY 180: Oil and Gas Production Engineering (ENERGY 280)

Design and analysis of production systems for oil and gas reservoirs. Topics: well completion, single-phase and multi-phase flow in wells and gathering systems, artificial lift and field processing, well stimulation, inflow performance. Prerequisite: 120.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ENGR 10: Introduction to Engineering Analysis

Integrated approach to the fundamental scientific principles that are the cornerstones of engineering analysis: conservation of mass, atomic species, charge, momentum, angular momentum, energy, production of entropy expressed in the form of balance equations on carefully defined systems, and incorporating simple physical models. Emphasis is on setting up analysis problems arising in engineering. Topics: simple analytical solutions, numerical solutions of linear algebraic equations, and laboratory experiences. Provides the foundation and tools for subsequent engineering courses. Prerequisite: AP Physics and AP Calculus or equivalent.
Terms: Spr, Sum | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ENGR 14: Intro to Solid Mechanics

Introduction to engineering analysis using the principles of engineering solid mechanics. Builds on the math and physical reasoning concepts in Physics 41 to develop skills in evaluation of engineered systems across a variety of fields. Foundational ideas for more advanced solid mechanics courses such as ME80 or CEE101A. Interactive lecture sessions focused on mathematical application of key concepts, with weekly complementary lab session on testing and designing systems that embody these concepts. Limited enrollment, subject to instructor approval. Pre-requisite: Physics 41.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ENGR 15: Dynamics

The application of Newton's Laws to solve 2-D and 3-D static and dynamic problems, particle and rigid body dynamics, freebody diagrams, and equations of motion, with application to mechanical, biomechanical, and aerospace systems. Computer numerical solution and dynamic response. Prerequisites: Calculus (differentiation and integration) such as MATH 41; and ENGR 14 (statics and strength) or a mechanics course in physics such as PHYSICS 41.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ENGR 20: Introduction to Chemical Engineering (CHEMENG 20)

Overview of chemical engineering through discussion and engineering analysis of physical and chemical processes. Topics: overall staged separations, material and energy balances, concepts of rate processes, energy and mass transport, and kinetics of chemical reactions. Applications of these concepts to areas of current technological importance: biotechnology, energy, production of chemicals, materials processing, and purification. Prerequisite: CHEM 31.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ENGR 25B: Biotechnology (CHEMENG 25B)

Biology and chemistry fundamentals, genetic engineering, cell culture, protein production, pharmaceuticals, genomics, viruses, gene therapy, evolution, immunology, antibodies, vaccines, transgenic animals, cloning, stem cells, intellectual property, governmental regulations, and ethics. Prerequisites: CHEM 31 and MATH 20 or equivalent courage.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGR 25E: Energy: Chemical Transformations for Production, Storage, and Use (CHEMENG 25E)

An introduction and overview to the challenges and opportunities of energy supply and consumption. Emphasis on energy technologies where chemistry and engineering play key roles. Review of energy fundamentals along with historical energy perspectives and current energy production technologies. In depth analysises of solar thermal systems, biofuels, photovoltaics and electrochemical devices (batteries and fuel cells). Prerequisites: high school chemistry or equivalent.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGR 40: Introductory Electronics

Not offered. Students wishing to complete the equivalent of ENGR 40 should enroll in both ENGR 40A and ENGR 40B.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ENGR 40A: Introductory Electronics

First portion of the former ENGR 40, for students not pursuing degree in Electrical Engineering. Instruction to be completed in the first seven weeks of the quarter. Students wishing to complete the equivalent of ENGR 40 should enroll in both ENGR 40A and ENGR 40B. Overview of electronic circuits and applications. Electrical quantities and their measurement, including operation of the oscilloscope. Basic models of electronic components including resistors, capacitors, inductors, and the operational amplifier. Lab. Lab assignments. Enrollment limited to 300.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ENGR 40M: An Intro to Making: What is EE

Is a hands-on class where students learn to make stuff. Through the process of building, you are introduced to the basic areas of EE. Students build a "useless box" and learn about circuits, feedback, and programming hardware, a light display for your desk and bike and learn about coding, transforms, and LEDs, a solar charger and an EKG machine and learn about power, noise, feedback, more circuits, and safety. And you get to keep the toys you build. Prerequisite: CS 106A.
Terms: Aut, Spr, Sum | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGR 42: Introduction to Electromagnetics and Its Applications (EE 42)

Electricity and magnetism and its essential role in modern electrical engineering devices and systems, such as sensors, displays, DVD players, and optical communication systems. The topics that will be covered include electrostatics, magnetostatics, Maxwell's equations, one-dimensional wave equation, electromagnetic waves, transmission lines, and one-dimensional resonators. Pre-requisites: MATH 42 or MATH 51 or CME 100 or equivalent.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ENGR 50: Introduction to Materials Science, Nanotechnology Emphasis

The structure, bonding, and atomic arrangements in materials leading to their properties and applications. Topics include electronic and mechanical behavior, emphasizing nanotechnology, solid state devices, and advanced structural and composite materials.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGR 50M: Introduction to Materials Science, Biomaterials Emphasis

Topics include: the relationship between atomic structure and macroscopic properties of man-made and natural materials; mechanical and thermodynamic behavior of surgical implants including alloys, ceramics, and polymers; and materials selection for biotechnology applications such as contact lenses, artificial joints, and cardiovascular stents. No prerequisite.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGR 62: Introduction to Optimization (MS&E 111, MS&E 211)

Formulation and computational analysis of linear, quadratic, and other convex optimization problems. Applications in machine learning, operations, marketing, finance, and economics. Prerequisite: CME 100 or MATH 51.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGR 70A: Programming Methodology (CS 106A)

Introduction to the engineering of computer applications emphasizing modern software engineering principles: object-oriented design, decomposition, encapsulation, abstraction, and testing. Emphasis is on good programming style and the built-in facilities of respective languages. No prior programming experience required. Summer quarter enrollment is limited. Alternative versions of CS106A are available which cover most of the same material but in different programming languages: Java [Fall, Win, Spr, or Sum qtr enroll in CS106A Section 1] Javascript [Fall qtr enroll in CS 106A Section 2] Python [Winter or Spring qtr enroll in CS 106A Section 3]
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-FR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGR 70B: Programming Abstractions (CS 106B)

Abstraction and its relation to programming. Software engineering principles of data abstraction and modularity. Object-oriented programming, fundamental data structures (such as stacks, queues, sets) and data-directed design. Recursion and recursive data structures (linked lists, trees, graphs). Introduction to time and space complexity analysis. Uses the programming language C++ covering its basic facilities. Prerequisite: 106A or equivalent. Summer quarter enrollment is limited.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-FR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGR 70X: Programming Abstractions (Accelerated) (CS 106X)

Intensive version of 106B for students with a strong programming background interested in a rigorous treatment of the topics at an accelerated pace. Additional advanced material and more challenging projects. Winter quarter assignments will be based in CS department research. Prerequisite: excellence in 106A or equivalent, or consent of instructor. Winter quarter enrollment limited to 30.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-FR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGR 80: Introduction to Bioengineering (Engineering Living Matter) (BIOE 80)

Students completing BIOE.80 should have a working understanding for how to approach the systematic engineering of living systems to benefit all people and the planet. Our main goals are (1) to help students learn ways of thinking about engineering living matter and (2) to empower students to explore the broader ramifications of engineering life. Specific concepts and skills covered include but are not limited to: capacities of natural life on Earth; scope of the existing human-directed bioeconomy; deconstructing complicated problems; reaction & diffusion systems; microbial human anatomy; conceptualizing the engineering of biology; how atoms can be organized to make molecules; how to print DNA from scratch; programming genetic sensors, logic, & actuators; biology beyond molecules (photons, electrons, etc.); what constraints limit what life can do?; what will be the major health challenges in 2030?; how does what we want shape bioengineering?; who should choose and realize various competing bioengineering futures?
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-FR | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ENGR 90: Environmental Science and Technology (CEE 70)

Introduction to environmental quality and the technical background necessary for understanding environmental issues, controlling environmental degradation, and preserving air and water quality. Material balance concepts for tracking substances in the environmental and engineering systems.
Terms: Win, Sum | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-AQR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Kopperud, R. (PI)

ENGR 105: Feedback Control Design

Design of linear feedback control systems for command-following error, stability, and dynamic response specifications. Root-locus and frequency response design techniques. Examples from a variety of fields. Some use of computer aided design with MATLAB. Prerequisite: EE 102B, CME 102 (Math 53) or ME 161.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGR 120: Fundamentals of Petroleum Engineering (ENERGY 120)

Lectures, problems, field trip. Engineering topics in petroleum recovery; origin, discovery, and development of oil and gas. Chemical, physical, and thermodynamic properties of oil and natural gas. Material balance equations and reserve estimates using volumetric calculations. Gas laws. Single phase and multiphase flow through porous media.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-FR, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

GEOPHYS 60N: Man versus Nature: Coping with Disasters Using Space Technology (EE 60N)

Preference to freshman. Natural hazards, earthquakes, volcanoes, floods, hurricanes, and fires, and how they affect people and society; great disasters such as asteroid impacts that periodically obliterate many species of life. Scientific issues, political and social consequences, costs of disaster mitigation, and how scientific knowledge affects policy. How spaceborne imaging technology makes it possible to respond quickly and mitigate consequences; how it is applied to natural disasters; and remote sensing data manipulation and analysis. GER:DB-EngrAppSci
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Zebker, H. (PI)

GEOPHYS 90: Earthquakes and Volcanoes (EARTHSYS 113)

Is the "Big One" overdue in California? What kind of damage would that cause? What can we do to reduce the impact of such hazards in urban environments? Does "fracking" cause earthquakes and are we at risk? Is the United States vulnerable to a giant tsunami? The geologic record contains evidence of volcanic super eruptions throughout Earth's history. What causes these gigantic explosive eruptions, and can they be predicted in the future? This course will address these and related issues. For non-majors and potential Earth scientists. No prerequisites. More information at: https://stanford.box.com/s/zr8ar28efmuo5wtlj6gj2jbxle76r4lu
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

GEOPHYS 190: Near-Surface Geophysics

Introduction to geophysical methods that can be used for imaging and characterizing groundwater systems; modeling and interpretation of the data. This Cardinal Class will be structured around solving a problem currently faced by a community in the Central Valley of California: How to select a site that can be used to recharge the groundwater? Where is there sand and gravel? clay? Where will the water go? We will review data from the area and develop a plan for the acquisition of geophysical data to image sediment texture in the subsurface. Data will be acquired during a weekend field trip to the community. Each week includes two hours of lectures; plus one 1.5-hour lab that involves acquisition of field data, or computer modeling/analysis of datanPre-requisite: CME 100 or Math 51, or co-registration in either.n(Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center)
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

LINGUIST 183: Programming and Algorithms for Natural Language Processing

Construction of computer programs for linguistic processes such as string search, morphological, syntactic, and semantic analysis and generation, and simple machine translation. Emphasis is on the algorithms that have proved most useful for solving such problems.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

MATH 114: Introduction to Scientific Computing (CME 108)

Introduction to Scientific Computing Numerical computation for mathematical, computational, physical sciences and engineering: error analysis, floating-point arithmetic, nonlinear equations, numerical solution of systems of algebraic equations, banded matrices, least squares, unconstrained optimization, polynomial interpolation, numerical differentiation and integration, numerical solution of ordinary differential equations, truncation error, numerical stability for time dependent problems and stiffness. Implementation of numerical methods in MATLAB programming assignments. Prerequisites: MATH 51, 52, 53; prior programming experience (MATLAB or other language at level of CS 106A or higher).
Terms: Win, Sum | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-FR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

MATSCI 81N: Bioengineering Materials to Heal the Body

Preference to freshmen. Real-world examples of materials developed for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine therapies. How scientists and engineers design new materials for surgeons to use in replacing body parts such as damaged heart or spinal cord tissue. How cells interact with implanted materials. Students identify a clinically important disease or injury that requires a better material, proposed research approaches to the problem, and debate possible engineering solutions.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Heilshorn, S. (PI)

MATSCI 142: Quantum Mechanics of Nanoscale Materials

Introduction to quantum mechanics and its application to the properties of materials. No prior background beyond a working knowledge of calculus and high school physics is presumed. Topics include: The Schrodinger equation and applications to understanding of the properties of quantum dots, semiconductor heterostructures, nanowires, and bulk solids. Tunneling processes and applications to nanoscale devices; the scanning tunneling microscope, and quantum cascade lasers. Simple models for the electronic properties and band structure of materials including semiconductors, insulators and metals and applications to semiconductor devices. Time-dependent perturbation theory and interaction of light with materials with applications to laser technology. Recommended: ENGR 50 or equivalent introductory materials science course. (Formerly 157)
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

MATSCI 143: Materials Structure and Characterization

Students will study the theory and application of characterization techniques used to examine the structure of materials at the nanoscale. Students will learn to classify the structure of materials such as semiconductors, ceramics, metals, and nanotubes according to the principles of crystallography. Methods used widely in academic and industrial research, including X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy, will be demonstrated along with their application to the analysis of nanostructures. Prerequisites: E-50 or equivalent introductory materials science course. (Formerly 153)
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Brock, R. (PI); Pian, K. (TA)

MATSCI 144: Thermodynamic Evaluation of Green Energy Technologies

Understand the thermodynamics and efficiency limits of modern green technologies such as carbon dioxide capture from air, fuel cells, batteries, and solar-thermal power. Recommended: ENGR 50 or equivalent introductory materials science course. (Formerly 154)
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Chueh, W. (PI); Jin, N. (TA)

MATSCI 145: Kinetics of Materials Synthesis

The science of synthesis of nanometer scale materials. Examples including solution phase synthesis of nanoparticles, the vapor-liquid-solid approach to growing nanowires, formation of mesoporous materials from block-copolymer solutions, and formation of photonic crystals. Relationship of the synthesis phenomena to the materials science driving forces and kinetic mechanisms. Materials science concepts including capillarity, Gibbs free energy, phase diagrams, and driving forces. Prerequisites: MatSci 144. (Formerly 155)
Terms: given next year | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

MATSCI 151: Microstructure and Mechanical Properties (MATSCI 251)

Primarily for students without a materials background. Mechanical properties and their dependence on microstructure in a range of engineering materials. Elementary deformation and fracture concepts, strengthening and toughening strategies in metals and ceramics. Topics: dislocation theory, mechanisms of hardening and toughening, fracture, fatigue, and high-temperature creep. Undergraduates register in 151 for 4 units; graduates register for 251 in 3 units.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

MATSCI 152: Electronic Materials Engineering

Materials science and engineering for electronic device applications. Kinetic molecular theory and thermally activated processes; band structure; electrical conductivity of metals and semiconductors; intrinsic and extrinsic semiconductors; elementary p-n junction theory; operating principles of light emitting diodes, solar cells, thermoelectric coolers, and transistors. Semiconductor processing including crystal growth, ion implantation, thin film deposition, etching, lithography, and nanomaterials synthesis.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Dionne, J. (PI); Dai, A. (TA)

MATSCI 156: Solar Cells, Fuel Cells, and Batteries: Materials for the Energy Solution (EE 293A, ENERGY 293A)

Operating principles and applications of emerging technological solutions to the energy demands of the world. The scale of global energy usage and requirements for possible solutions. Basic physics and chemistry of solar cells, fuel cells, and batteries. Performance issues, including economics, from the ideal device to the installed system. The promise of materials research for providing next generation solutions. Undergraduates register in 156 for 4 units; graduates register in 256 for 3 units. Prerequisites: MATSCI 145 and 152 or equivalent coursework in thermodynamics and electronic properties.
Terms: Win, Sum | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

MATSCI 160: Nanomaterials Laboratory

Preference to sophomores and juniors. Hands-on approach to synthesis and characterization of nanoscale materials. How to make, pattern, and analyze the latest nanotech materials, including nanoparticles, nanowires, and self-assembled monolayers. Techniques such as soft lithography, self-assembly, and surface functionalization. The VLS mechanism of nanowire growth, nanoparticle size control, self-assembly mechanisms, and surface energy considerations. Laboratory projects. Enrollment limited to 24.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

MATSCI 161: Energy Materials Laboratory (MATSCI 171)

A material that is currently being used in a cutting edge energy -related device such as a solar cell, battery or smart window will be thoroughly characterized throughout the quarter. Fabrication techniques could include electroplating, spin coating and thermal evaporation. There will be an emphasis in this course on characterization methods such as scanning electron microscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, optical microscopy, four-point probe measurements of conductivity, visible absorption and reflection spectroscopy and electrochemical measurements (cyclic voltammetry). Devices will be fabricated and their performance will be tested. In this Writing in the Major course, students will put together all of the data they collect during the quarter into a final paper. Undergraduates register for 161 for 4 units; graduates register for 171 for 3 units. Prerequisites: MATSCI 143 or equivalent course in materials characterization
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

MATSCI 162: X-Ray Diffraction Laboratory (MATSCI 172, PHOTON 172)

Experimental x-ray diffraction techniques for microstructural analysis of materials, emphasizing powder and single-crystal techniques. Diffraction from epitaxial and polycrystalline thin films, multilayers, and amorphorous materials using medium and high resolution configurations. Determination of phase purity, crystallinity, relaxation, stress, and texture in the materials. Advanced experimental x-ray diffraction techniques: reciprocal lattice mapping, reflectivity, and grazing incidence diffraction. Enrollment limited to 20. Undergraduates register for 162 for 4 units; graduates register for 172 for 3 units. Prerequisites: MATSCI 143 or equivalent course in materials characterization.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

MATSCI 163: Mechanical Behavior Laboratory (MATSCI 173)

Technologically relevant experimental techniques for the study of the mechanical behavior of engineering materials in bulk and thin film form, including tension testing, nanoindentation, and wafer curvature stress analysis. Metallic and polymeric systems. In addition to regularly scheduled lecture (M/W), this course includes a three-hour lab session every other week (T/W/Th). Register for lecture section in addition to one lab section. Undergraduates register for 163 in 4 units; graduates register in 173 for 3 units
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Brock, R. (PI); Chang, D. (TA)

MATSCI 164: Electronic and Photonic Materials and Devices Laboratory (MATSCI 174)

Lab course. Current electronic and photonic materials and devices. Device physics and micro-fabrication techniques. Students design, fabricate, and perform physical characterization on the devices they have fabricated. Established techniques and materials such as photolithography, metal evaporation, and Si technology; and novel ones such as soft lithography and organic semiconductors. Prerequisite: MATSCI 152 or 199 or consent of instructor. Undergraduates register in 164 for 4 units; graduates register in 174 for 3 units.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

MATSCI 190: Organic and Biological Materials (MATSCI 210)

Unique physical and chemical properties of organic materials and their uses. The relationship between structure and physical properties, and techniques to determine chemical structure and molecular ordering. Examples include liquid crystals, dendrimers, carbon nanotubes, hydrogels, and biopolymers such as lipids, protein, and DNA. Prerequisite: Thermodynamics and ENGR 50 or equivalent. Undergraduates register for 190 for 4 units; graduates register for 210 for 3 units.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

MATSCI 192: Materials Chemistry (MATSCI 202)

An introduction to the fundamental physical chemical principles underlying materials properties. Beginning from basic quantum chemistry, students will learn how the electronic configuration of molecules and solids impacts their structure, stability/reactivity, and spectra. Topics for the course include molecular symmetry, molecular orbital theory, solid-state chemistry, coordination compounds, and nanomaterials chemistry. Using both classroom lectures and journal discussions, students will gain an understanding of and be well-positioned to contribute to the frontiers of materials chemistry, ranging from solar-fuel generation to next-generation cancer treatments. Undergraduates register in 192 for 4 units; graduates register in 202 for 3 units.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

MATSCI 193: Atomic Arrangements in Solids (MATSCI 203)

Atomic arrangements in perfect and imperfect solids, especially important metals, ceramics, and semiconductors. Elements of formal crystallography, including development of point groups and space groups. Undergraduates register in 193 for 4 units; graduates register in 203 for 3 units.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

MATSCI 194: Thermodynamics and Phase Equilibria

The principles of heterogeneous equilibria and their application to phase diagrams. Thermodynamics of solutions; chemical reactions; non-stoichiometry in compounds; first order phase transitions and metastability; thermodynamics of surfaces, elastic solids, dielectrics, and magnetic solids. Undergraduates register for 194 for 4 units; graduates register for 204 for 3 units.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

MATSCI 195: Waves and Diffraction in Solids (MATSCI 205, PHOTON 205)

The elementary principals of x-ray, vibrational, and electron waves in solids. Basic wave behavior including Fourier analysis, interference, diffraction, and polarization. Examples of wave systems, including electromagnetic waves from Maxwell's equations. Diffracted intensity in reciprocal space and experimental techniques such as electron and x-ray diffraction. Lattice vibrations in solids, including vibrational modes, dispersion relationship, density of states, and thermal properties. Free electron model. Basic quantum mechanics and statistical mechanics including Fermi-Dirac and Bose-Einstein statistics. Prerequisite: MATSCI 193/203 or consent of instructor. Undergraduates register for 195 for 4 units; graduates register for 205 for 3 units.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Dionne, J. (PI); Dai, A. (TA)

MATSCI 196: Defects in Crystalline Solids (MATSCI 206)

Thermodynamic and kinetic behaviors of 0-D (point), 1-D (line), and 2-D (interface and surface) defects in crystalline solids. Influences of these defects on the macroscopic ionic, electronic, and catalytic properties of materials, such as batteries, fuel cells, catalysts, and memory-storage devices. Prerequisite: MATSCI 193/203. Undergraduates register for 196 for 4 units; graduates register for 206 for 3 units.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Chueh, W. (PI); Deng, D. (TA)

MATSCI 197: Rate Processes in Materials (MATSCI 207)

Diffusion and phase transformations in solids. Diffusion topics: Fick's laws, atomic theory of diffusion, and diffusion in alloys. Phase transformation topics: nucleation, growth, diffusional transformations, spinodal decomposition, and interface phenomena. Material builds on the mathematical, thermodynamic, and statistical mechanical foundations in the prerequisites. Prerequisites: MATSCI 194/204. Undergraduates register for 197 for 4 units; graduates register for 207 for 3 units.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

MATSCI 198: Mechanical Properties of Materials (MATSCI 208)

Introduction to the mechanical behavior of solids, emphasizing the relationships between microstructure and mechanical properties. Elastic, anelastic, and plastic properties of materials. The relations between stress, strain, strain rate, and temperature for plastically deformable solids. Application of dislocation theory to strengthening mechanisms in crystalline solids. The phenomena of creep, fracture, and fatigue and their controlling mechanisms. Prerequisites: MATSCI 193/203. Undergraduates register for 198 for 4 units; graduates register for 208 for 3 units.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

MATSCI 199: Electronic and Optical Properties of Solids (MATSCI 209)

The concepts of electronic energy bands and transports applied to metals, semiconductors, and insulators. The behavior of electronic and optical devices including p-n junctions, MOS-capacitors, MOSFETs, optical waveguides, quantum-well lasers, light amplifiers, and metallo-dielectric light guides. Emphasis is on relationships between structure and physical properties. Elementary quantum and statistical mechanics concepts are used. Prerequisite: MATSCI 195/205 or equivalent. Undergraduates register for 199 for 4 units; graduates register for 209 for 3 units.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ME 10N: Form and Function of Animal Skeletons (BIOE 10N)

Preference to freshmen. The biomechanics and mechanobiology of the musculoskeletal system in human beings and other vertebrates on the level of the whole organism, organ systems, tissues, and cell biology. Field trips to labs.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ME 12N: The Jet Engine

Preference to freshmen. This seminar describes how a jet engine works with examples given from modern commercial and military engines. We then explore the technologies and sciences required to understand them including thermodynamics, turbomachinery, combustion, advanced materials, cooling technologies, and testing methods. Visits to research laboratories, examination of a partially disassembled engine, and probable operation of a small jet engine. Prerequisites: high school physics and preferably calculus.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ME 14N: How Stuff Is Made

The design and engineering of products and processes, such as machining, fabric, food, and electrical goods. Tradeoffs in choice of materials, features, and process selection. Final project: students research and redesign the engineering and manufacturing aspects of a product and its processes with an eye toward sustainability. Includes several field trips to manufacturing facilities.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ME 21: Renaissance Machine Design

Technological innovations of the 1400s that accompanied the proliferation of monumental art and architecture by Brunelleschi, da Vinci, and others who designed machines and invented novel construction, fresco, and bronze-casting techniques. The social and political climate, from the perspective of a machine designer, that made possible and demanded engineering expertise from prominent artists. Hands-on projects to provide a physical understanding of Renaissance-era engineering challenges and introduce the pleasure of creative engineering design. Technical background not required.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ME 24N: Designing the Car of the Future

Preference to freshmen. Automotive design drawing from all areas of mechanical engineering. The state of the art in automotive design and the engineering principles to understand vehicle performance. Future technologies for vehicles. Topics include vehicle emissions and fuel consumption, possibilities of hydrogen, drive-by-wire systems, active safety and collision avoidance, and human-machine interface issues.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ME 70: Introductory Fluids Engineering

Elements of fluid mechanics as applied to engineering problems. Equations of motion for incompressible ideal flow. Hydrostatics. Control volume laws for mass, momentum, and energy. Bernoulli equation. Dimensional analysis and similarity. Flow in ducts. Boundary layer flows. Lift and drag. Lab experiment demonstrations. Prerequisites: ENGR 14 and 30.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ME 80: Mechanics of Materials

Mechanics of materials and deformation of structural members. Topics include stress and deformation analysis under axial loading, torsion and bending, column buckling and pressure vessels. Introduction to stress transformation and multiaxial loading. Prerequisite: ENGR 14.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ME 101: Visual Thinking

Lecture/lab. Visual thinking and language skills are developed and exercised in the context of solving design problems. Exercises for the mind's eye. Rapid visualization and prototyping with emphasis on fluent and flexible idea production. The relationship between visual thinking and the creative process. Limited enrollment, attendance at first class required.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ME 112: Mechanical Systems Design

Lecture/lab. Characteristics of machine elements including gears, bearings, and shafts. Design for fatigue life. Electric motor fundamentals. Transmission design for maximizing output power or efficiency. Mechanism types, linkage analysis and kinematic synthesis. Team-based design projects emphasizing the balance of physical with virtual prototyping based on engineering analysis. Lab for dissection of mechanical systems and project design reviews. Prerequisites: 80, 101. Recommended: 203, ENGR 15.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ME 113: Mechanical Engineering Design

Capstone course. Mechanical engineering design is experienced by students as they work on team projects. Prerequisites: 80, 101, 112, 203. Enrollment limited to ME majors. One of two available capstone design courses.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ME 115B: Product Design Methods

Problem-finding, problem-solving, intermediate creativity methods and effective techniques for researching human factors and presenting product concepts. Individual- and team-based design projects emphasizing advanced visual thinking and prototyping skills.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ME 131A: Heat Transfer

The principles of heat transfer by conduction, convection, and radiation with examples from the engineering of practical devices and systems. Topics include transient and steady conduction, conduction by extended surfaces, boundary layer theory for forced and natural convection, boiling, heat exchangers, and graybody radiative exchange. Prerequisites: 70, 30 (formerly listed at ENGR30). Recommended: intermediate calculus, ordinary differential equations.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ME 131B: Fluid Mechanics: Compressible Flow and Turbomachinery

Engineering applications involving compressible flow: aircraft and rocket propulsion, power generation; application of mass, momentum, energy and entropy balance to compressible flows; variable area isentropic flow, normal shock waves, adiabatic flow with friction, flow with heat addition. Operation of flow systems: the propulsion system. Turbomachinery: pumps, compressors, turbines. Angular momentum analysis of turbomachine performance, centrifugal and axial flow machines, effect of blade geometry, dimensionless performance of turbomachines; hydraulic turbines; steam turbines; wind turbines. Compressible flow turbomachinery: the aircraft engine. Prerequisites: 70, ENGR 30.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ME 140: Advanced Thermal Systems

Capstone course. Thermal analysis and engineering emphasizing integrating heat transfer, fluid mechanics, and thermodynamics into a unified approach to treating complex systems. Mixtures, humidity, chemical and phase equilibrium, and availability. Labs apply principles through hands-on experience with a turbojet engine, PEM fuel cell, and hybrid solid/oxygen rocket motor. Use of MATLAB as a computational tool. Prerequisites: ENGR 30, ME 70, and 131A,B.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ME 161: Dynamic Systems, Vibrations and Control (ME 261)

(Graduate students only enroll in 261.) Modeling, analysis, and measurement of mechanical and electromechanical systems. Numerical and closed form solutions of ordinary differential equations governing the behavior of single and multiple degree of freedom systems. Stability, resonance, amplification and attenuation, and control system design. Demonstrations and laboratory experiments. Prerequisite: Calculus (differentiation and integration), ordinary differential equations (e.g., CME 102 or MATH53), basic linear algebra (determinants and solving linear equations), and familiarity with basic dynamics (F=m*a) and electronics (v=i*R). ME undergraduates must enroll for 4 units with lab. All others should enroll for 3 units without lab.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

MS&E 93Q: Nuclear Weapons, Energy, Proliferation, and Terrorism

Preference to sophomores. At least 20 countries have built or considered building nuclear weapons. However, the paths these countries took in realizing their nuclear ambitions vary immensely. Why is this the case? How do the histories, cultures, national identities, and leadership of these countries affect the trajectory and success of their nuclear programs? This seminar will address these and other questions about nuclear weapons and their proliferation. Students will learn the fundamentals of nuclear technology, including nuclear weapons and nuclear energy, and be expected to use this knowledge in individual research projects on the nuclear weapons programs of individual countries. Case studies will include France, UK, China, India, Israel, Pakistan, North Korea, South Africa, Libya, Iraq, and Iran, among others. Please note any language skills in your application. Recommended: 193 or 293.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

MS&E 111: Introduction to Optimization (ENGR 62, MS&E 211)

Formulation and computational analysis of linear, quadratic, and other convex optimization problems. Applications in machine learning, operations, marketing, finance, and economics. Prerequisite: CME 100 or MATH 51.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

MS&E 120: Probabilistic Analysis

Concepts and tools for the analysis of problems under uncertainty, focusing on focusing on structuring, model building, and analysis. Examples from legal, social, medical, and physical problems. Topics include axioms of probability, probability trees, random variables, distributions, conditioning, expectation, change of variables, and limit theorems. Prerequisite: CME 100 or MATH 51.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-FR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

MS&E 121: Introduction to Stochastic Modeling

Stochastic processes and models in operations research. Discrete and continuous time parameter Markov chains. Queuing theory, inventory theory, simulation. Prerequisite: 120, 125, or equivalents.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

MS&E 130: Information Networks and Services

Architecture of the Internet and performance engineering of computer systems and networks. Switching, routing and shortest path algorithms. Congestion management and queueing networks. Peer-to-peer networking. Wireless and mobile networking. Information service engineering and management. Search engines and recommendation systems. Reputation systems and social networking technologies. Security and trust. Information markets. Select special topics and case studies. Prerequisites: 111, 120, and CS 106A.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

MS&E 152: Introduction to Decision Analysis

How to make good decisions in a complex, dynamic, and uncertain world. People often make decisions that on close examination they regard as wrong. Decision analysis uses a structured conversation based on actional thought to obtain clarity of action in a wide variety of domains. Topics: distinctions, possibilities and probabilities, relevance, value of information and experimentation, relevance and decision diagrams, risk attitude.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-FR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

MUSIC 150: Musical Acoustics

The physics of vibrating systems, waves, and wave motion. Time- and frequency-domain analysis of sound. Room acoustics, reverberation, and spatialization. The acoustics of musical instruments: voice, strings, and winds. Emphasis is on the practical aspects of acoustics in making music. Hands-on and computer-based lab. See http://ccrma.stanford.edu/courses/150/.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Rossing, T. (PI)

MUSIC 192A: Foundations of Sound-Recording Technology

For upper division undergraduates and graduate students; preference given to Music majors with MST specialization. Topics: elementary electronics; the physics of sound transduction and microphone operation, selection, and placement; mixing consoles; connectors and device interconnection; grounding and shielding; principles of analog magnetic recording; operation maintenance of recording equipment; and principles of recording engineering. Enrollment limited. Prerequisites: MUSIC 150, algebra, physics basics, and consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Kadis, J. (PI)

MUSIC 192B: Advanced Sound Recording Technology

Topics: noise reduction techniques; dynamics and time-delay audio effects; the principles of digital audio; disk- and tape-based digital recorders; digital audio workstations and editing; advanced multitrack techniques; SMPTE and MIDI time code and device synchronization; MIDI sequencing and synchronization. See http://ccrma.stanford.edu/courses/. Prerequisite: 192A.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Kadis, J. (PI)

OSPAUSTL 10: Coral Reef Ecosystems

Key organisms and processes, and the complexity of coral reef ecosystems. Students explore the Great Barrier Reef from the southern end which demonstrates the physical factors that limit coral reefs, to the northern reef systems which demonstrate key aspects of these high biodiversity ecosystems. Human-related changes. Emphasis is on research experiences and development of analytical skills. Two units only counted for the Biology major.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Arrigo, K. (PI)

OSPAUSTL 25: Freshwater Systems

Integrated water resource management and how this applies across the globe, comparing strategies and results in the developing and more developing world. Ethics, values and politics of water and the management of extremes such as drought and flood. Ecology and hydrology in an urban context, along with important current issues such as stormwater and water sensitive urban design. Construction of a well, a water tank, and a pit latrine. Community service working with a local catchment management group on riparian and wetland restoration work. Field work complements lectures.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Boyer, D. (GP)

OSPAUSTL 30: Coastal Forest Ecosystems

Prehistory of Australian rainforest and how rainforest structure and biodiversity change with altitude, latitude, and geology. Tropical coastal marine wetlands, mangrove forests, and the relationship between land- and sea-based biota. Biology and ecology of marine plants, mangroves, and tropical salt marsh. Introduction to specialized fields of marine plant biology and ecology including biogeography and evolution, aquatic plant ecophysiology, water quality and bioindicator techniques, pollution and eutrophication, and environmental control of marine plant distribution and productivity. Two units only counted for the Biology major.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Boyer, D. (GP)

OSPBER 50M: Introductory Science of Materials

Topics include: the relationship between atomic structure and macroscopic properties of man-made and natural materials; mechanical and thermodynamic behavior of surgical implants including alloys, ceramics, and polymers; and materials selection for biotechnology applications such as contact lenses, artificial joints, and cardiovascular stents. No prerequisite.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

OSPFLOR 50M: Introductory Science of Materials

Topics include: the relationship between atomic structure and macroscopic properties of man-made and natural materials; mechanical and thermodynamic behavior of surgical implants including alloys, ceramics, and polymers; and materials selection for biotechnology applications such as contact lenses, artificial joints, and cardiovascular stents. No prerequisite.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Heilshorn, S. (GP)

OSPPARIS 50M: Introductory Science of Materials

Topics include: the relationship between atomic structure and macroscopic properties of man-made and natural materials; mechanical and thermodynamic behavior of surgical implants including alloys, ceramics, and polymers; and materials selection for biotechnology applications such as contact lenses, artificial joints, and cardiovascular stents. No prerequisite.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Heilshorn, S. (GP)

OSPSANTG 58: Living Chile: A Land of Extremes

Physical, ecological, and human geography of Chile. Perceptions of the Chilean territory and technologies of study. Flora, fauna, and human adaptations to regional environments. Guest lectures; field trips; workshops.
Terms: Spr, Sum | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Reid, S. (PI); Jaksic, I. (GP)
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