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ANTHRO 32: Theories in Race and Ethnicity: A Comparative Perspective (CSRE 32)

This undergraduate course employs an anthropological and historical perspective to introduce students to ideas and concepts of race and ethnicity that emerged primarily in Europe and the United States in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries and that continue to shape contemporary racial attitudes, interactions, and inequalities. Ideas about race and ethnicity forged outside the U.S. and case studies from other nations are presented to broaden students' understanding and to overcome the limitations of an exclusive focus on the U.S. This course is geared to sophomores and juniors who have already taken at least one course on race and ethnicity, anthropology, African American Studies, Asian American Studies, Chicana/o Studies, Jewish Studies or Native American Studies.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Yanagisako, S. (PI)

ANTHRO 82P: The Literature of Psychosis (HUMBIO 162L, PSYC 82, PSYC 282)

One of the great gifts of literature is its ability to give us insight into the internal worlds of others. This is particularly true of that state clinicians call "psychosis." But psychosis is a complex concept. It can be terrifying and devastating for patients and families, and yet shares characteristics with other, less pathological states, such as mysticism and creativity. How then can we begin to make sense of it? In this course, we will examine the first-hand experience of psychosis. We will approach it from multiple perspectives, including clinical descriptions, works of art, and texts by writers ranging from Shakespeare, to the science fiction writer Philip K. Dick, to patients attempting to describe their experience. This class is not only for students thinking of careers in medicine, psychology or anthropology, but also readers and writers interested exploring extraordinary texts. There are no prerequisites necessary; all that is needed is a love of language and a curiosity about the secrets of other minds.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: ; Mason, D. (PI)

ANTHRO 93: Prefield Research Seminar

For Anthropology majors only; non-majors register for 93B. Preparation for anthropological field research in other societies and the U.S. Data collection techniques include participant observation, interviewing, surveys, sampling procedures, life histories, ethnohistory, and the use of documentary materials. Strategies of successful entry into the community, research ethics, interpersonal dynamics, and the reflexive aspects of fieldwork. Prerequisites: two ANTHRO courses or consent of instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Tambar, K. (PI)

ANTHRO 93B: Prefield Research Seminar: Non-Majors

Preparation for anthropological field research in other societies and the U.S. Data collection techniques include participant observation, interviewing, surveys, sampling procedures, life histories, ethnohistory, and the use of documentary materials. Strategies for successful entry into the community, research ethics, interpersonal dynamics, and the reflexive aspects of fieldwork. Service Learning Course (certified by Haas Center).
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Fullwiley, D. (PI)

ANTHRO 95: Research in Anthropology

Independent research conducted under faculty supervision, normally taken junior or senior year in pursuit of a senior paper or an honors project. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ANTHRO 95B: Directed Study in Honors and Senior Papers

Taken in the final quarter before graduation. Independent study and work on senior paper for students admitted to the program. Prerequisite: consent of program adviser and instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-10 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ANTHRO 97: Internship in Anthropology

Opportunity for students to pursue their specialization in an institutional setting such as a laboratory, clinic, research institute, or government agency. May be repeated for credit. Service Learning Course (certified by Haas Center).
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ANTHRO 110: Environmental Archaeology (ANTHRO 210, ARCHLGY 110)

This course investigates the field of environmental archaeology. Its goals are twofold: 1) to critically consider the intellectual histories of environmental archaeology, and, 2) to survey the various techniques and methods by which archaeologists assess historical environmental conditions through material proxies. The course will include lab activities.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Bauer, A. (PI)

ANTHRO 112A: Archaeology of Human Rights (URBANST 147)

This introductory seminar provides a critical vantage point about human rights discourse from an archaeological perspective. The seminar is organized around four main questions: (1) Is cultural heritage a human right? (2) What are archaeologists learning about how the material and temporal dimensions of power and resistance? (3) How is archaeological evidence being used in investigations of human rights violations? (4) Can research about the past shape the politics of the present? Topics to be discussed include archaeological research on mass internment, colonialism, enslavement and coerced labor, ethnic cleansing, homelessness, gender discrimination, indigenous rights, and environmental justice.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Voss, B. (PI)

ANTHRO 116B: Anthropology of the Environment (ANTHRO 216B)

This seminar interrogates the history of anthropology's approach to the environment, beginning with early functionalist, structuralist, and Marxist accounts of human-environment relationships. It builds towards more recent developments in the field, focusing on nonhuman and relational ontologies as well as current projects on the intersections of nature, capital, politics, and landscape histories. At the end of this class, students will be familiar with the intellectual histories of environmental anthropology and contemporary debates and tensions around questions of ethics, agency, environment, and historical causality.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Bauer, A. (PI)

ANTHRO 128: Visual Studies

Drawing on anthropology, art history, cultural studies, and other fields, this course explores how and why one might want to think critically about the politics of visuality, social imagination, the politics of making and consuming images and things, iconophonia and iconophilia, the classification of people and things into ¿artists¿ and ¿art¿, and cultural production more generally.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Malkki, L. (PI)

ANTHRO 135: Cultural Studies (ANTHRO 235)

Identity, community, and culture; their interactions and formation.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Ebron, P. (PI)

ANTHRO 137: The Politics of Humanitarianism (ANTHRO 237)

What does it mean to want to help, to organize humanitarian aid, in times of crisis? At first glance, the impulse to help issue generis a good one. Helping is surely preferable to indifference and inaction. This does not mean that humanitarian interventions entail no ethical or political stakes or that they are beyond engaged critique. We need to critique precisely that which we value, and to ask some hard questions, among them these: What are the differences among humanitarianism, charity, and philanthropy? What of social obligations and solidarities? How does the neoliberal world order currently create structural inequalities that ensure the reproduction of poverty and violence? How does the current order of things resemble or differ from the colonial world order? This course examines the history of humanitarian sensibilities and the emergence of organized action in the ¿cause of humanity¿. In the early years of humanitarian intervention, political neutrality was a key principle; it has now come under ever greater analytical and political scrutiny. We will examine the reasons for the politicization and militarization of aid -- be it humanitarian aid in natural disasters or political crises; development programs in the impoverished south (¿the Third World¿), or peace-keeping. We will end with a critical exploration of the concept of human rights, humanity, and personhood. The overall methodological aim of the course is to demonstrate what insights an ethnographic approach to the politics, ethics, and aesthetics of humanitarianism can offer.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ANTHRO 138: Medical Ethics in a Global World: Examining Race, Difference and Power in the Research Enterprise (ANTHRO 238, CSRE 138)

This course will explore historical as well as current market transformations of medical ethics in different global contexts. We will examine various aspects of the research enterprise, its knowledge-generating and life-saving goals, as well as the societal, cultural, and political influences that make medical research a site of brokering in need of oversight and emergent ethics.nThis seminar will provide students with tools to explore and critically assess the various technical, social, and ethical positions of researchers, as well as the role of the state, the media, and certain publics in shaping scientific research agendas. We will also examine how structural violence, poverty, global standing, and issues of citizenship also influence issues of consent and just science and medicine.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-ER | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Fullwiley, D. (PI)

ANTHRO 156: Japanese Anthropology (ANTHRO 256)

This is an advanced reading seminar in the field of Japanses Anthropology. nIt will explore the historical development of the field and the contemporary issues and topics taken up by scholars of Japanese anthropology. Prior knowledge of Japanese language, history, and, society is required.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Inoue, M. (PI)

ANTHRO 159C: Ecological Humanities (ANTHRO 259C)

What sort of topics, research questions, approaches, theories and concepts lead to an integration of various kinds of knowledges? Ecological Humanities provides a conceptual platform for a merger of humanities and social sciences with earth and life sciences, soil science and forensic sciences. The course will discuss such selected topics as the Anthropocene, geologic/mineral and exhumed subjects/personae, bio- and geosocial collectives, symbiotic life-forms, non-human agencies, and forensic landscapes as examples of this merger.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Domanska, E. (PI)

ANTHRO 176: Cultures, Minds, and Medicine (ANTHRO 276)

This workshop aims to bring together scholars from the social sciences, humanities, medicine and bio-science and technology to explore the ways that health and illness are made through complex social forces. We aim for informal, interactive sessions, full of debate and good will. Dates of meetings will be listed in the notes section in the time schedule.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Luhrmann, T. (PI)

ANTHRO 179B: Culture of Disease: The Social History of Vaccines

This course will detail the history and develop of vaccines, specifically examining critical issues such as personal choice v. public health, the use of experimental subjects, population-wide medical trials, and the use of animal tissues in vaccine development.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Jain, S. (PI)

ANTHRO 182N: Smoke and Mirrors in Global Health

A few years ago, health experts began calling out tobacco as engendering a global health crisis, categorizing the cigarette as the world's greatest weapon of mass destruction. A "global health crisis"? What merits that title if not tobacco use? A hundred million people were killed by tobacco in the 20th century, and ten times that number ¿ a billion people ¿ are predicted to die prematurely from exposure to cigarette smoke over the next hundred years. How has tobacconcome to be labeled a global health crisis over the last decade and what has been the political response? From whence does activism and ongoing complacency regarding tobacco arise? How are they created in different cultural contexts?nnThis course aims to provide students conceptual tools to tackle two specific thought projects: (1) to understand how institutional actors compete to define a situation in the world today as a problem of global health, and (2) to understand the sociocultural means by which something highly dangerous to health such as the cigarette is made both politically contentious and inert. On both fronts, special attention will be given to the ways global health activism and complacency unfold in the U.S. and China.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ANTHRO 199: Senior and Master's Paper Writing Workshop (ANTHRO 299)

Techniques of interpreting data, organizing bibliographic materials, writing, editing and revising. Preparation of papers for conferences and publications in anthropology. Seniors register for 199; master's students register for 299.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Wetsel, M. (PI)

ANTHRO 210: Environmental Archaeology (ANTHRO 110, ARCHLGY 110)

This course investigates the field of environmental archaeology. Its goals are twofold: 1) to critically consider the intellectual histories of environmental archaeology, and, 2) to survey the various techniques and methods by which archaeologists assess historical environmental conditions through material proxies. The course will include lab activities.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Bauer, A. (PI)

ANTHRO 216B: Anthropology of the Environment (ANTHRO 116B)

This seminar interrogates the history of anthropology's approach to the environment, beginning with early functionalist, structuralist, and Marxist accounts of human-environment relationships. It builds towards more recent developments in the field, focusing on nonhuman and relational ontologies as well as current projects on the intersections of nature, capital, politics, and landscape histories. At the end of this class, students will be familiar with the intellectual histories of environmental anthropology and contemporary debates and tensions around questions of ethics, agency, environment, and historical causality.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ANTHRO 235: Cultural Studies (ANTHRO 135)

Identity, community, and culture; their interactions and formation.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Ebron, P. (PI)

ANTHRO 237: The Politics of Humanitarianism (ANTHRO 137)

What does it mean to want to help, to organize humanitarian aid, in times of crisis? At first glance, the impulse to help issue generis a good one. Helping is surely preferable to indifference and inaction. This does not mean that humanitarian interventions entail no ethical or political stakes or that they are beyond engaged critique. We need to critique precisely that which we value, and to ask some hard questions, among them these: What are the differences among humanitarianism, charity, and philanthropy? What of social obligations and solidarities? How does the neoliberal world order currently create structural inequalities that ensure the reproduction of poverty and violence? How does the current order of things resemble or differ from the colonial world order? This course examines the history of humanitarian sensibilities and the emergence of organized action in the ¿cause of humanity¿. In the early years of humanitarian intervention, political neutrality was a key principle; it has now come under ever greater analytical and political scrutiny. We will examine the reasons for the politicization and militarization of aid -- be it humanitarian aid in natural disasters or political crises; development programs in the impoverished south (¿the Third World¿), or peace-keeping. We will end with a critical exploration of the concept of human rights, humanity, and personhood. The overall methodological aim of the course is to demonstrate what insights an ethnographic approach to the politics, ethics, and aesthetics of humanitarianism can offer.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ANTHRO 238: Medical Ethics in a Global World: Examining Race, Difference and Power in the Research Enterprise (ANTHRO 138, CSRE 138)

This course will explore historical as well as current market transformations of medical ethics in different global contexts. We will examine various aspects of the research enterprise, its knowledge-generating and life-saving goals, as well as the societal, cultural, and political influences that make medical research a site of brokering in need of oversight and emergent ethics.nThis seminar will provide students with tools to explore and critically assess the various technical, social, and ethical positions of researchers, as well as the role of the state, the media, and certain publics in shaping scientific research agendas. We will also examine how structural violence, poverty, global standing, and issues of citizenship also influence issues of consent and just science and medicine.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Fullwiley, D. (PI)

ANTHRO 256: Japanese Anthropology (ANTHRO 156)

This is an advanced reading seminar in the field of Japanses Anthropology. nIt will explore the historical development of the field and the contemporary issues and topics taken up by scholars of Japanese anthropology. Prior knowledge of Japanese language, history, and, society is required.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Inoue, M. (PI)

ANTHRO 259C: Ecological Humanities (ANTHRO 159C)

What sort of topics, research questions, approaches, theories and concepts lead to an integration of various kinds of knowledges? Ecological Humanities provides a conceptual platform for a merger of humanities and social sciences with earth and life sciences, soil science and forensic sciences. The course will discuss such selected topics as the Anthropocene, geologic/mineral and exhumed subjects/personae, bio- and geosocial collectives, symbiotic life-forms, non-human agencies, and forensic landscapes as examples of this merger.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Domanska, E. (PI)

ANTHRO 276: Cultures, Minds, and Medicine (ANTHRO 176)

This workshop aims to bring together scholars from the social sciences, humanities, medicine and bio-science and technology to explore the ways that health and illness are made through complex social forces. We aim for informal, interactive sessions, full of debate and good will. Dates of meetings will be listed in the notes section in the time schedule.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Luhrmann, T. (PI)

ANTHRO 299: Senior and Master's Paper Writing Workshop (ANTHRO 199)

Techniques of interpreting data, organizing bibliographic materials, writing, editing and revising. Preparation of papers for conferences and publications in anthropology. Seniors register for 199; master's students register for 299.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Wetsel, M. (PI)

ANTHRO 300: Reading Theory Through Ethnography

Required of and restricted to first-year ANTHRO Ph.D. students. Focus is on contemporary ethnography and related cultural and social theories generated by texts. Topics include agency, resistance, and identity formation, and discourse analysis. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Tambar, K. (PI)

ANTHRO 308: Proposal Writing Seminar in Cultural and Social Anthropology

Required of second-year Ph.D. students in the culture and society track. The conceptualization of dissertation research problems, the theories behind them, and the methods for exploring them. Participants draft a research prospectus suitable for a dissertation proposal and research grant applications. Limited enrollment. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Fullwiley, D. (PI)

ANTHRO 308A: Proposal Writing Seminar in Archaeology

Required of second-year Ph.D. students in the archaeology track. The conceptualization of dissertation research problems, the theories behind them, and the methods for exploring them. Participants draft a research prospectus suitable for a dissertation proposal and research grant applications. Limited enrollment. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Meskell, L. (PI)

ANTHRO 308B: Interdisciplinary Research Proposals: Effective Presentation, Skills, and Styles

This seminar examines the diverse skills, methods, and styles required for the development and production of interdisciplinary dissertation and grant proposals. Topical focus centers primarily on proposals with both social science and natural science elements. Proposals may include a diverse suite of methods and analyses. Throughout this course, we critique examples, assess writing styles and presentation, evaluate budgets, assess data management plans, examine tables and figures, and discuss reviews and evaluations of research proposals. Students are expected to be either in the early stages of writing their dissertation proposal or preparing applications for grants and fellowships. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Curran, L. (PI)

ANTHRO 311G: Introduction to Culture and Society Graduate Studies in Anthropology

Required graduate seminar for CS track. The history of anthropological theory and key theoretical and methodological issues in cultural anthropology. Prerequistes: this course is open only to Ph.D. students in anthropology or by permission of the instructor.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Yanagisako, S. (PI)

ANTHRO 320A: Race, Ethnicity, and Language: Racial, Ethnic, and Linguistic Formations (CSRE 389A, EDUC 389A, LINGUIST 253)

Language, as a cultural resource for shaping our identities, is central to the concepts of race and ethnicity. This seminar explores the linguistic construction of race and ethnicity across a wide variety of contexts and communities. We begin with an examination of the concepts of race and ethnicity and what it means to be "doing race," both as scholarship and as part of our everyday lives. Throughout the course, we will take a comparative perspective and highlight how different racial/ethnic formations (Asian, Black, Latino, Native American, White, etc.) participate in similar, yet different, ways of drawing racial and ethnic distinctions. The seminar will draw heavily on scholarship in (linguistic) anthropology, sociolinguistics and education. We will explore how we talk and don't talk about race, how we both position ourselves and are positioned by others, how the way we talk can have real consequences on the trajectory of our lives, and how, despite this, we all participate in maintaining racial and ethnic hierarchies and inequality more generally, particularly in schools.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ANTHRO 324: Political Anthropology

An anthropological approach to politics through bringing anthropological ways of thinking and modes of analysis to bear on key presuppositions of modern Western political thought. Ideas of rights, the individual, society, liberty, democracy, equality, and solidarity; ethnographic accounts used to identify the limits of conventional analytical approaches and to document the forms of politics that such approaches either ignore or misunderstand. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Ferguson, J. (PI)

ANTHRO 326: Postcolonial and Indigenous Archaeologies

The role of postcolonial and Indigenous archaeologies as emergeant disciplinary activities within contemporary society. Community based archaeologies; the roles of oral history, landscape, and memory; archaeology as political action; and history in archaeological projects. The emergence of Indigenous archaeology within N. America in relation to limitations imposed by processual or new archaeology; and NAGPRA, Kennewick, essentialism, and terminal narratives within this context. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Wilcox, M. (PI)

ANTHRO 332: Anthropology of Ethics

Recent decades have witnessed what some scholars have termed an ethical turn in anthropology. This course explores the emergence of this field of study, asking the following questions: What has motivated a renewed anthropological interest in the subject of ethics? How has a focus on ethics enabled the development of new theoretical currents in the discipline? To what extent have anthropological studies of ethics provided new understandings of traditional topics, concerning social hierarchy, power relations, embodiment, and subject-formation?
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Tambar, K. (PI)

ANTHRO 348A: Health, Politics, and Culture of Modern China

One of the most generative regions for medical anthropology inquiry in recent years has been Asia. This seminar is designed to introduce upper division undergraduates and graduate students to the methodological hurdles, representational challenges, and intellectual rewards of investigating the intersections of health, politics, and culture in contemporary China.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Kohrman, M. (PI)

ANTHRO 367: The Anthropology of Science: Global Politics and Laboratory Life

Science and technology are important cultural products that often dramatically reorganize various aspects of human life. In this course we will explore how recent innovations in the life sciences and biomedicine may reconfigure crucial elements of social institutions, lend new structures to identity politics, and often change the way we interact with and conceive of nature. We will examine these issues in various global settings to explore how everyday politics shape politics of life in different locales.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Fullwiley, D. (PI)

ANTHRO 400: Cultural and Social Dissertation Writers Seminar

Required of fifth-year Ph.D. students returning from dissertation field research and in the process of writing dissertations and preparing for professional employment. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Jain, S. (PI); Malkki, L. (PI)

ANTHRO 401A: Qualifying Examination: Topic

Required of second- and third-year Ph.D. students writing the qualifying paper or the qualifying written examination. May be repeat for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 2-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

ANTHRO 401B: Qualifying Examination: Area

Required of second- and third-year Ph.D. students writing the qualifying paper or the qualifying written examination. May be repeated for credit one time.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 2-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

ANTHRO 441: Master's Research Thesis

Supervised work for terminal and coterminal master's students writing the master's project in the final quarter of the degree program.
Terms: Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-15 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ANTHRO 442: Reading Group

Graduate student reading group on a thematic topic of interest.nIntended for first or second-year cohort PhD students.nSections: Liisa Malkki, Sylvia Yanagisako, Thomas Hansen, Paulla Ebron, andnMiyako Inoue
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 2-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

ANTHRO 444: Anthropology Colloquium

Department Colloquia Lecture Series. Lectures presented on a variety of anthropological topics. Colloquium is intended for the Department of Anthropology's under graduate majors and graduate students. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

ANTHRO 445: Anthropology Brown Bag Series

Current topics and trends in cultural/social anthropology, archaeology, and environmental and ecological anthropology. Enrollment in this noon-time series is restricted to the Department of Anthropology Master¿s students and First and Second-year PhD students.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

ANTHRO 450: Research Apprenticeship

Supervised work on a research project with an individual faculty member. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-15 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ANTHRO 451: Directed Individual Study

Supervised work for a qualifying paper, examination, or project with an individual faculty member.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-15 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ANTHRO 452: Graduate Internship

Provides graduate students with the opportunity to pursue their area of specialization in an institutional setting such as a laboratory, clinic, research institute, or government agency.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 3-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
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