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CEE 273B: The Business of Water (LAW 2508)

One of the fastest growing economic sectors is the water field, and private water companies are playing an increasingly important role in improving water management around the world. In some cases, however, the involvement of private companies in the water sector has also proven controversial (e.g., when private companies have taken over public water supply systems in developing countries such as Bolivia). This course will look at established or emerging businesses in the water sector and the legal, economic, and social issues that they generate. These businesses include investor-owned water utilities, water technology companies (e.g., companies investing in new desalination or water recycling technologies), water-right funds (who directly buy and sell water rights), social impact funds, innovative agricultural operations, water concessionaires, and infrastructure construction companies and investors. Each week will focus on a different business and company. Company executives will attend the class session and discuss their business with the class. In most classes, we will examine (1) the viability and efficacy of the company's business plan, (2) the legal and/or social issues arising from the business' work, and (3) how the business might contribute to improved water management and policy. Each student will be expected to write (1) two short reflection papers during the course of the quarter on businesses that present to the class, and (2) a 15-page paper at the conclusion on the class on either a water company of the student's choice or a policy initiative that can improve the role that business plays in improving water management (either in a particular sector or more generally). Elements used in grading: Attendance, Class Participation, Written Assignments, Final Paper. Cross-listed with Civil & Environmental Engineering (CEE 273B).
Terms: Aut | Units: 2 | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail

GSBGEN 566: Ethics in Action - It's Never Black and White / Decisions Have Consequences

GSBGEN 566 is an elective course offered to 2nd-year MBA and MSx students. The goal of this course is to improve students' judgment in confronting ethical situations encountered in the normal course of business activities. Classes use the Socratic method to examine ethical questions and build analytical skills. The course aims to sharpen moral reasoning and build judgment without favoring a particular position. The course will be taught by Mark Leslie and Peter Levine, Lecturers.nnThe course, which is "vignette based, will involve revealing partial information about the situation during the class, interspersed with discussion as the vignette develops. Frequent student-to-student and student-to-instructor role-playing will be encouraged. Cases will be drawn from a wide selection of real business situations with protagontist as guests whenever available), including such topics as raising venture capital, managing major industrial customers, product distribution agreements, board of director fiduciary conflicts, developing financial instruments, senior management mutiny, work/life balance.. etc.nnThe class is extremely engaging - it is quite usual to find continuing discussion of the day's case outside the classroom among small groups of students.nnThis class is for two GSB credits and will be graded on a pass/fail basis. Sixty percent of the final grade will be derived from classroom performance; the remainder will be based on a final written assignment.
Units: 2 | Grading: GSB Pass/Fail

GSBGEN 576: Work and Family

This course examines the strategies that highly educated women and men use to combine work and family and the strategies that managers and policy makers can use to help others strike a balance. Topics include the tradeoffs in becoming a stay-at-home parent, the economic value of unpaid labor, the consequences of balancing two high-powered careers and children, the economics of marriage, fertility, child care, and elder care, the gendered division of labor in the home, time-management , workplace innovations, and policy initiatives. Guest speakers add their own perspectives on these issues and describe the roles their organizations play.
Units: 2 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded

LAW 2508: The Business of Water (CEE 273B)

One of the fastest growing economic sectors is the water field, and private water companies are playing an increasingly important role in improving water management around the world. In some cases, however, the involvement of private companies in the water sector has also proven controversial (e.g., when private companies have taken over public water supply systems in developing countries such as Bolivia). This course will look at established or emerging businesses in the water sector and the legal, economic, and social issues that they generate. These businesses include investor-owned water utilities, water technology companies (e.g., companies investing in new desalination or water recycling technologies), water-right funds (who directly buy and sell water rights), social impact funds, innovative agricultural operations, water concessionaires, and infrastructure construction companies and investors. Each week will focus on a different business and company. Company executives will attend the class session and discuss their business with the class. In most classes, we will examine (1) the viability and efficacy of the company's business plan, (2) the legal and/or social issues arising from the business' work, and (3) how the business might contribute to improved water management and policy. Each student will be expected to write (1) two short reflection papers during the course of the quarter on businesses that present to the class, and (2) a 15-page paper at the conclusion on the class on either a water company of the student's choice or a policy initiative that can improve the role that business plays in improving water management (either in a particular sector or more generally). Elements used in grading: Attendance, Class Participation, Written Assignments, Final Paper. Cross-listed with Civil & Environmental Engineering (CEE 273B).
Terms: Aut | Units: 2 | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail

MGTECON 327: Business and Public Policy Perspectives on U.S. Inequality

This class will analyze the growth in inequality in the US over the last several decades and how that trend is likely to continue or change in the future. We will ask if and how public policy can affect inequality. We will also focus on business's role -- what are the responsibilities of private sector companies, how does inequality affect them, and how should the growth in inequality affect their strategies? We will look at inequality in income, some of its potential sources, and its effects in other areas. Specifically, we will look at education, housing, the social safety net, migration, and the job market. The class will be very interactive and will be based on readings drawn from academic research, case studies, news, and opinion readings. We will also have guest speakers from industry, government, and non-profits. The class will be co-taught by a GSB labor economist and an advisor to policy makers with decades of business experience.nnLOGISTICAL NOTE: The class will not meet on May 23 or May 25. Instead, there will be a mandatory, all-day class field trip to explore inequality issues in depth and in person on Wednesday, May 24. If you have an academic-related reason you cannot make the trip, we will assign alternative work. However, the trip is required unless you have a conflicting class or academic obligation.
Units: 3 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded

OIT 273: Value Chain Innovations in Developing Economies

This course is about how to use entrepreneurship and innovations in the value chains to create values in developing economies. The course will cover important principles and ways in which the value chains can be re-engineered or new business models can be designed to create values. In addition to materials covering a diversity of industries and geographical regions, the course will also enable students to be exposed to some of the interventions that the Stanford Institute of Innovation in Developing Economies (SEED) is working on in West Africa. Work and exam requirements: Students are expected to develop a project report on either portfolio companies related to SEED or other enterprises to show how value chain innovations can be advanced.
Units: 2 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded

STRAMGT 519: Building Diverse and Inclusive Organizations

We will discuss effective strategies for building diverse and inclusive companies, and will address the barriers that can often exist. We'll study approaches to organizational design that limit unconscious bias and produce more objective decisions across the employee experience - from attracting and hiring candidates to developing and retaining employees. Finally, we'll look at how to create inclusive cultures, with a specific focus on feedback, belonging, and 'Radical Candor¿. The class will be taught by Fern Mandelbaum, Co-Founder and Managing Partner at Vista Venture Partners and Joelle Emerson, Founder and CEO of Paradigm. We will also hear from executives at companies that have successfully incorporated diversity and inclusion programs.
Units: 2 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded

STRAMGT 584: Assessing High Impact Business Models in Emerging Markets

In recent years, we've seen an explosion of innovative business models blazing new trails in emerging markets. Many of these models are achieving commercial success while transforming the lives of low-income populations. Using nine cases of both early-stage, entrepreneur-led ventures and later-stage, public or large-cap firms, this course will examine best practices for scaling new enterprises in emerging markets. It will do so primarily through the lens of a potential investor. It will also explore what is required to spark, nurture and scale entire sectors that serve rapidly growing, often low-income markets. What does it mean to work in markets with limited infrastructure? What common mistakes are made - whether in business model design, in supply chains, or in dealing with government - and how can we avoid them? Which are the best business models to serve markets that corporations have traditionally ignored, and in which government has failed to deliver? Who might be threatened by the success of these new businesses? The seminar is a good match for Stanford students interested in working or investing in emerging markets. It will be taught by Matt Bannick, who leads Omidyar Network (a $1 billion impact investing fund) and is the former President of eBay International and of PayPal.
Units: 2 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded
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