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TAPS 1: Introduction to Theater and Performance Studies

TAPS 1 provides you with a solid foundation in Theater Studies and traces the development of the burgeoning field of Performance Studies. We will consider a range of canonical plays and emerging performance forms, and explore how performance can also function as an interpretive framework for analyzing a broad range of social behaviors, sites, and institutions. Through a series of close readings, discussions, written and practical exercises, and viewings of live performance, this course will help you achieve a richer understanding of the performances you see and the performances you may wish to make. This quarter, TAPS 1 will serve as the platform for the Theater & Performance Studies professionalization series. We will host several guest speakers (directors, actors, playwrights, and dance practitioners), who will give you some real connections in the theater world and will provide you with information and skills to help you build a career in the arts.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

TAPS 11Q: Art in the Metropolis (ARTSINST 11Q)

This seminar is offered in conjunction with the annual "Arts Immersion" trip to New York that takes place over the spring break and is organized by the Stanford Arts Institute (SAI). Participation in the trip is a requirement for taking part in the seminar (and vice versa). The trip is designed to provide a group of students with the opportunity to immerse themselves in the cultural life of New York City guided by faculty and the SAI programming director. Students will experience a broad range and variety of art forms (visual arts, theater, opera, dance, etc.) and will meet with prominent arts administrators and practitioners, some of whom are Stanford alumni. For further details and updates about the trip, see http://arts.stanford.edu.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Jenkins, N. (PI)

TAPS 21: StoryCraft

StoryCraft is a hands-on, experiential workshop offering participants the opportunity, structure and guidance to craft compelling personal stories to be shared in front of a live audience. The class will focus on several areas of storytelling: Mining (how do you find your stories and extract the richest details?); Crafting (how do you structure the content and shape the language?); and Performing (how do you share your stories with presence, authenticity and connection?)
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 2 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Darby, M. (PI); Klein, D. (PI)

TAPS 21T: StoryCraft: On Sexuality (FEMGEN 21T)

What is "sexuality education", and what could it be? How do I tell a compelling story? In this class, students will learn about sexuality and storytelling from the inside out. We will explore various perspectives on sexuality that illuminate different aspects of our lives and then dive into our own stories to discover the richness and vibrancy of human sexuality. Due to the personal nature of the topic, we will emphasize safety, trust, and confidentiality throughout. The class offers the structure and guidance to 1) mine your life for stories, 2) craft the structure and shape of your stories, and 3) perform with presence, authenticity, and connection. Students will be selected from this class to tell their stories in Beyond Sex Ed: Consent & Sexuality at Stanford during NSO 2018. Before enrolling, ensure that you will be on campus Sept 20-22, 2018 for rehearsal and performance. Email the TA, Eisa, with any questions, eqalshamma@stanford.edu. Class will be held in KINGSCOTE Gardens First Floor Conference Room.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Booth, B. (PI)

TAPS 22: Scene Work

For actors who complete substantial scene work with graduate directors in the graduate workshop.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

TAPS 29: Theater Performance: Acting

Students cast in department productions receive credit for their participation as actors; 1-2 units for graduate directing workshop projects and 1-3 units for major productions (units determined by instructor). May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

TAPS 39: Theater Crew

For students working backstage, on run crew, or in the theater shops on TAPS department productions. Night and weekend time required. Pre-approval from Jane Casamajor (janecasa@stanford.edu) is required for enrollment.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

TAPS 103: Beginning Improvising

The improvisational theater techniques that teach spontaneity, cooperation, team building, and rapid problem solving, emphasizing common sense, attention to reality, and helping your partner. Based on TheatreSports by Keith Johnstone. Readings, papers, and attendance at performances of improvisational theater. Limited enrollment. Improv, Improvisation, creativity and creative expression. All who sign up are placed on a waitlist. Official enrollment will be determined after the first day of class. Attendance at the first class session is mandatory to be considered for enrollment in the course.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

TAPS 104: Intermediate Improvisation

This class is the continued study of improvisational theater with a focus on stage skills, short and long form performance formats, and offstage applications of collaborative creativity. It is open to any students who have taken TAPS 103 or have previous onstage improv experience AND consent of the instructor. May be repeat for credit.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Klein, D. (PI)

TAPS 108: Introduction to Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies (AMSTUD 107, CSRE 108, FEMGEN 101)

Introduction to interdisciplinary approaches to gender, sexuality, queer, trans and feminist studies. Topics include the emergence of sexuality studies in the academy, social justice and new subjects, science and technology, art and activism, history, film and memory, the documentation and performance of difference, and relevant socio-economic and political formations such as work and the family. Students learn to think critically about race, gender, and sexuality from local and global perspectives.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Daub, A. (PI); Jarvis, C. (PI)

TAPS 115: Musical Theater (MUSIC 183D)

In this workshop we will traverse the landscape of world of Musical Theater. It will serve as an introduction for the beginning actor and singer, and expand the more experienced performer's range in this genre. The world of Musical Theater is filled with stories of love, passion, joy, violence, heartbreak and rage. The class will include an introduction to vocal and movement skills for musical theater, beginning with exercises to build an ensemble and encourage a sense of play and relaxation in supportive environment. Our class must be a place where everyone feels safe. As ensemble members, we will be responsible for each other in this environment. nStudents will choose one solo song, and perform in a group number from this exciting discipline. The instructor will work with the actors on technique, utilization of action, specificity of language, personalization, and emotional truth. A professional coach from the theater community will conduct vocal coaching. Physical warm-ups and choreography will be suited for both the dancer and non-dancer.nThe class will culminate in the last week with live performance for friends and family.nSTUDENTS ARE ENCOURAGED TO BRING THEIR OWN SUGGESTIONS. (Isn't there a role you've always wanted to sing?)nRequired text: Broadway Musicals Show by Show: Sixth Edition - Stanley Green; Paperback
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

TAPS 120B: Acting II: Advanced Acting

Learn how to expand character work, beyond what is immediately familiar. Continuing basic practices from the first part of the sequence, in this quarter they will look beyond the strictly contemporary, and may begin to approach roles drawn from more challenging dramatic texts. This might include plays chosen from mid-century American classics, World Theater, or other works with specific historic or cultural requirements. Actors begin to learn how a performing artist researches and how that research can be used to enrich and deepen performance. Prerequisite: 120A or consent of instructor. Priority given to TAPS majors and minors.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Freed, A. (PI)

TAPS 124D: Acting for Non-Majors

Formerly TAPS 20. Creative play, ensemble work in a supportive environment. Designed for the student to experience a range of new creative skills, from group improvisation to partner work. Introductory work on freeing the natural voice and physical relaxation. Emphasis on rediscovering imaginative and creative impulses. Movement improvisation, listening exercises, and theater games release the energy, playfulness and willingness to take risks that is the essence of free and powerful performance. Course culminates with work on dramatic text.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE, way_ce | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Amarotico, K. (PI)

TAPS 125C: Acting Chekhov

Playwright Anton Chekhov helped revolutionize the theater with his naturalistic representation of life onstage. In this course, students will explore the creation of character and ensemble by doing scenes from Chekhov's plays with a particular focus on relationship, subtext, sensory life, and Russian history and culture in 1900. Students will practice the improvisational technique of Active Analysis to connect with and embody characters and events, as well as exploring various exercises of Michael Chekhov's such as the Psychological Gesture, and exercises involving tempo-rhythm, physical centers, and archetypes. Prerequisite: Acting 120A. Priority given to TAPS majors and minors.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Hunt, S. (PI)

TAPS 127W: Introduction to Clown

This course is an introduction to the world and play of the theatrical clown, constructed for actors to explore truth in size, vulnerability, and a personal sense of humor. Students will develop their ability to play with the audience, a greater capacity for freedom and abandon onstage, and a healthier relationship to failure and human idiocy. Areas of study include partnership and status play, comic rhythm and timing, the structure and development of comic material, and the beginnings of a personal eccentric Clown character. All coursework will be experiential and practical. Some stage experience is recommended but not required. Some outside rehearsal/investigation time required.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Chapman, M. (PI)

TAPS 132: Costume Design

This course introduces the goals, directives and techniques of designing costumes for performance. From the first reading of the script to opening night, all aspects will be covered including director/designer relationships, design approach, research, rendering, fabric selection, procurement or construction of costumes, fittings and final dress rehearsals. Each student will work on, or be assigned one main project of their choice. This class can coincide or be taken in advance of a student¿s involvement in a campus show, utilizing the campus project as their main project in the class. Smaller exercises will be given throughout the quarter to emphasize principles and invigorate design discussions. All students will be required to attend the performances of their peers¿ projects. One field trip to a professional theater may be planned.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Strayer, C. (PI)

TAPS 133T: Transgender Performance and Performativity (FEMGEN 133)

This course examines theater, performance art, dance, and embodied practice by transgender artists. Students will learn the history and politics of transgender performance while considering the creative processes and formal aesthetics trans artists use to make art. We will analyze creative work in conversation with critical and theoretical texts from the fields of performance studies, art history, and queer studies.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Crandall, M. (PI)

TAPS 134: Stage Management Project

For students stage managing a production in the Department of Theater and Performance Studies.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 3-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Kumaran, L. (PI)

TAPS 135C: Theory & Craft of the Scenographic Model

Students learn studio techniques for constructing dimensional models for stage designs. Students will work with their hands using common materials such as cardboard, paint and wood. Use of Stanford's Product Realization Lab encouraged for specialty items such as miniature furniture depending on departmental coordination.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

TAPS 140: Introduction to Projects in Theatrical Production

A seminar course for students performing significant production work on Theater and Performance Studies Department or other Stanford University student theater projects. Students serving as producers, directors, designers or stage managers, who wish mentorship and credit for their production work sign up for this course and contact the instructor, Laxmi Kumaran. nPrerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Kumaran, L. (PI)

TAPS 150G: Performing Race, Gender, and Sexuality (CSRE 150G, FEMGEN 150G)

This theory and practice-based course will examine performances by and scholarly texts about artists who critically and mindfully engage race, gender, and sexuality. Students will cultivate their skills as artist-scholars through written assignments and the creation of performance-based works in response to the assigned material. Attendance and written reflection on the TAPS Vital Signs: Performance Art in the 21st Century performance art series are required. The practical component of the class will also incorporate meditation into the process of preparing for, making, and critiquing performance. We will approach mindfulness as method and theory in our own practice, as well in relation to the works studied, while attending to the ethics and current debates concerning its use. Examples of artists studied include James Luna, Nao Bustamante, William Pope.L, Yoko Ono, Cassils, Adrian Piper, Guillermo Gomez-Peña, Nikki S. Lee, and Ana Mendieta.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Otalvaro, G. (PI)

TAPS 151: Dramaturgy (TAPS 315)

In this seminar, we will take the conventional idea of dramaturgy for narrative performance as developed in Western European theater since the enlightenment, and investigate its relation to non-narrative forms of performance in 20th and 21st (performance art, conceptual dance). Further, we will use dramaturgical procedures to explore the ideological content of performance and position of art institutions in our society. Finally, the students will get acquainted with production dramaturgy and get necessary tools to take the role of dramaturgs in actual performance productions.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Jakovljevic, B. (PI)

TAPS 154G: Black Magic: Ethnicity, Race, and Identity in Performance Cultures (AFRICAAM 154G, CSRE 154D, FEMGEN 154G)

In 2013, CaShawn Thompson devised a Twitter hashtag, #blackgirlmagic, to celebrate the beauty and intelligence of black women. Twitter users quickly adopted the slogan, using the hashtag to celebrate everyday moments of beauty, accomplishment, and magic. In contrast, #blackmagic is used to describe everything from the uncanny to the personal. This course examines the discursive phenomenon of "black magic" and its permutations throughout Anglo-American histories. We will investigate the binaries of black/dark, white/light magic that has entered our contemporary lexicon, reading material on religion, magic performance, and theater.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Robinson, A. (PI)

TAPS 155: Social Sculpture (ARTSTUDI 155)

This course investigates the immediacy of the body as material and sculpture in order to investigate private and social spaces. Actions are often used to understand or question the function and psychological aspects of a space and are documented for the perpetuation of these ideas. Throughout the quarter we will investigate the body as material and develop site specific performances enacted for: Private/Domestic and Public Space; Constructed Space & Physical Space; ecological systems; and generate both Individual & Collaborative based Actions, Interventions, & Events."
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Cassils, C. (PI)

TAPS 156V: Vital Signs: Performance in the 21st Century (ARTSTUDI 256V, TAPS 256V)

The first decade and a half of the 21st century have been transformative for performance art. On the one hand, it brought an unprecedented cultural acceptance of this art form, which is now featured in most prestigious museums and art festivals; on the other, the most recent generation of performance artists is showing a great awareness of the historicity and complexity of this form. In this class, we will try to recognize and investigate these and other prominent features of performance art produced since the turn of the millennium. We will use as our primary case studies performances that will be featured in the series Vital Signs: Contemporary Performance Art Series, hosted by TAPS in 2017-2018. The primary objective of the series is to highlight and showcase underrepresented performance forms such as experimental performance art, durational art, and body art, among others, by artists from communities that remain invisible or underrepresented in mainstream performing arts. The series is curated by the Los Angeles-based artist Cassils, who has been listed by the Huffington Post as 'one of ten transgender artists who are changing the landscape of contemporary art' and has achieved international recognition for a rigorous engagement with the body as a form of social sculpture. Cassils's curatorial vision is to present established performance artists alongside emerging artists. Each quarter, a pair of artists will visit Stanford for two days (Thursday-Friday). On day one of their visit they will offer a workshop or a public performance, and on the second day they will engage in a public dialogue. The class will meet each quarter for three weeks: before, during, and after the artists' visit. This way, the students will have an opportunity to prepare for the visit, engage with the visiting artists, and reflect on their work. They will receive their grades upon completion of the class, in the spring of 2018.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

TAPS 157: World Drama and Performance (TAPS 357)

This course takes up a geographically expansive conversation by looking at modern and contemporary drama from nations including Ghana, Egypt, India, Argentina, among others. Considering influential texts from the Global South will also enable us to explore a range of themes and methodologies that are radically re-shaping the field of Performance Studies. We will examine the relationship between colonialism and globalization, empire and capital, cosmopolitanism and neoliberalism. Re-situating our perspective from the Global South and the non-western world, we will ¿provincialize Europe¿ and probe the limits of its universalizing discourses.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Menon, J. (PI)

TAPS 160M: Introduction to Representations of the Middle East in Dance, Performance, & Popular Culture (CSRE 160M, DANCE 160M, FEMGEN 160M)

This course will introduce students to the ways in which the Middle East has been represented and performed by/in the 'West' through dance, performance, and popular culture in both historical and contemporary contexts. A brief look through today's media sources exposes a wide range of racialized and gendered representations of the Middle East that shape the way the world imagines the Middle East to be. As postcolonial theorist Edward Said explains, the framework we call Orientalism establishes the ontological character of the Orient and the Oriental as inherently `Other'. Starting with 19th century colonialism and continuing into the post-9/11 era, this course will trace the Western production, circulation, and consumption of representations of the Middle East as 'Other' in relation to global geopolitics. We will further examine dance forms produced in mid-twentieth century Iran and Egypt, with particular attention to nation-state building and constructions of gender. Finally, we will examine artistic productions and practices from the Middle East and Middle Eastern diasporic communities that respond to colonialism, war, displacement, secularism, and Euro-American Empire. Using dance studies, postcolonial feminist, and critical race theoretical frameworks, we will consider the gender, racial, political, and cultural implications of selected performance works and practices in order to analyze how bodies produce meaning in dance, performance art, theater, film, photography, and new media. Students will engage in multiple modes of learning; the course will include lectures, engaged group discussions, viewing of live and recorded performance, embodied participation in dance practice, student oral presentations, and a variety of writing exercises. Course assignments will culminate in a final research project related to class themes and methods.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

TAPS 175T: Collaborative Theater-Making (TAPS 275T)

Instructor Young Jean Lee is a playwright and director who will have two plays premiering on Broadway in 2018-2019. In this workshop, students will collaborate on the creation of one of these plays, which explores the intersection of class and race. The point of this class will be to replicate as closely as possible Lee's process for developing a new play in a professional setting. Students will "learn by doing" as they serve as actors, assistant directors, and dramaturgs in the same way that her actual actors, assistant directors, and dramaturgs would do. Please note that this is not designed to be an acting class with lots of fun moving around. There is no guarantee that every student will have a chance to perform. Also, Lee's new play development process is challenging, slow, and often requires sitting around a table having gruelingly intense conversations for hours at a time. This class is designed to teach students skills they need to succeed in a professional theater environment. Please contact the instructor ASAP at yjl@stanford.edu for an application, which will be be due on March 1, with notifications being sent out on March 15. If you find out about this class after the application deadline and send the instructor an email asking her to allow you to apply late, you must present a convincing explanation for why an exception should be made in your case. Nobody who misses the first class will be permitted to take the course.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Lee, Y. (PI)

TAPS 178D: Editing a Full-Length Play (TAPS 278D)

To participate in this workshop, students must bring in a draft of a full length straight play for revision, which was written in part one of this course, WRITING A FULL-LENGTH PLAY. In conjunction with a variety of other editing techniques, students will focus on editing in collaboration with others. They will learn how to edit in response to hearing their plays read aloud; how to give and solicit the most useful kinds of feedback; how to cope with harsh criticism; what to do when people are offended by what they have written; how to know which notes to pay attention to and which notes to ignore; and how to let go of ideas and text that are not working. Other topics to be discussed: getting your work produced vs. self-producing; directing your own work vs. working with a director; and starting your own theater company. Enrollment for this course is closed.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Lee, Y. (PI)

TAPS 180Q: Noam Chomsky: The Drama of Resistance

Preference to sophomores. Chomsky's ideas and work which challenge the political and economic paradigms governing the U.S. Topics include his model for linguistics; cold war U.S. involvements in S.E. Asia, the Middle East, Central and S. America, the Caribbean, and Indonesia and E. Timor; the media, terrorism, ideology, and culture; student and popular movements; and the role of resistance.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-ER, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Rehm, R. (PI)

TAPS 190: Special Research

Individual project on the work of a playwright, period, or genre. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

TAPS 191: Independent Study

Individual research with a faculty member. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-18 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

TAPS 192: Nitery Board Practicum (TAPS 292)

Credit given for student board members of the Experimental Nitery Studio. Undergraduate students should enroll in TAPS 192. Ph.D. students should enroll in TAPS 292.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Hill, L. (PI); Looser, D. (PI)

TAPS 200: Senior Project

All TAPS Majors must complete a Senior Project that represents significant work in any area of theater and/or performance. The project must be an original contribution and can consist of any of the following: devising a performance, choreographing a dance, stage managing a production, designing a large theater work, performing a major role, writing a play, directing a show, or researching and writing a senior essay. Work for this project normally begins in Spring Quarter of the junior year and must be completed by the end of the senior year. Students receive credit for senior projects through TAPS 200. A minimum of 4 units is required, but additional units are available for larger projects. Students pursuing senior projects must submit a two-page proposal to a faculty advisor of their choice, which must be approved by the Undergraduate Advisor and the department faculty no later than the end of Spring Quarter of the junior year.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 2-9 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

TAPS 202: Honors Thesis

An advanced written project to fulfill the requirements for the Honors degree in TAPS. There are two ways to undertake an honors thesis. The first is to write a 40-50 page essay, which presents research on an important issue or subject of the student¿s choice. The second option is a 30-page essay that takes the student¿s capstone project as a case study and critically analyzes the creative work. Students are expected to work consistently throughout the year with their advisor, whom they identify at the time of application. Advisors can be selected from Academic Council faculty or artists-in-residence. Students should enroll in TAPS 202 each quarter during the senior year (1 unit in Autumn; 1 unit in Winter; 2 units in Spring).
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

TAPS 231: Advanced Stage Lighting Design

Individually structured class in lighting mechanics and design through experimentation, discussions, and written reports. Prerequisite: 131 or consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Shayne, T. (PI)

TAPS 232: Advanced Costume Design

Individually structured tutorial for costume designers. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: 132 or consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

TAPS 233: Advanced Scene Design

Individually structured workshop. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: 133 or consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

TAPS 234: Advanced Stage Management Project

For students stage managing a Department of Drama production. Prerequisite: 134.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 2-9 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Kumaran, L. (PI)

TAPS 252: Objects and Things: Theater, Performance, and Material Culture

Objects, devices, machines, technologies--how do we engage with the material things that come across our research, into our performances, and out of our lives? This course examines how various scholars, theorists, and practitioners have defined and engaged with material culture. We will read popular theories of thing-ness including but not limited to object-oriented ontology (Bill Brown and Jane Bennett), commodity things (Arjun Appadurai), actor-network theory (Bruno Latour), scriptive things (Robin Bernstein), and prop theory (Andrew Sofer). The course will use their theories as lenses on the objects of our own research, countering the Western historiography through case studies, alternative readings, and in-class presentations. New work from performance studies (Uri McMillian etc.) will also provide current case studies in scholarship. Focusing on theater and performance studies, this class will also draw on sociology, anthropology, the history of technology, and art history.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Robinson, A. (PI)

TAPS 253T: Virtual Realities: Art, Technology, Performance

Contemporary virtual reality extends a long-standing quest to create a fully immersive, multisensory environment, a quest that may go back to the earliest cave paintings and includes such projects as cathedrals, operas, panoramas, theme parks, video games, and multimedia "happenings." What is VR's relation to this long and varied history? What are the ethics, aesthetics, promises, and perils of this new medium? What is meant by "immersion," "interactivity," and "presence," and how is VR changing those terms? How might VR relate to contemporary immersive theater and installation art - as well as to the mediatization of society more generally?
Terms: Spr | Units: 2-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Smith, M. (PI)

TAPS 256V: Vital Signs: Performance in the 21st Century (ARTSTUDI 256V, TAPS 156V)

The first decade and a half of the 21st century have been transformative for performance art. On the one hand, it brought an unprecedented cultural acceptance of this art form, which is now featured in most prestigious museums and art festivals; on the other, the most recent generation of performance artists is showing a great awareness of the historicity and complexity of this form. In this class, we will try to recognize and investigate these and other prominent features of performance art produced since the turn of the millennium. We will use as our primary case studies performances that will be featured in the series Vital Signs: Contemporary Performance Art Series, hosted by TAPS in 2017-2018. The primary objective of the series is to highlight and showcase underrepresented performance forms such as experimental performance art, durational art, and body art, among others, by artists from communities that remain invisible or underrepresented in mainstream performing arts. The series is curated by the Los Angeles-based artist Cassils, who has been listed by the Huffington Post as 'one of ten transgender artists who are changing the landscape of contemporary art' and has achieved international recognition for a rigorous engagement with the body as a form of social sculpture. Cassils's curatorial vision is to present established performance artists alongside emerging artists. Each quarter, a pair of artists will visit Stanford for two days (Thursday-Friday). On day one of their visit they will offer a workshop or a public performance, and on the second day they will engage in a public dialogue. The class will meet each quarter for three weeks: before, during, and after the artists' visit. This way, the students will have an opportunity to prepare for the visit, engage with the visiting artists, and reflect on their work. They will receive their grades upon completion of the class, in the spring of 2018.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

TAPS 275T: Collaborative Theater-Making (TAPS 175T)

Instructor Young Jean Lee is a playwright and director who will have two plays premiering on Broadway in 2018-2019. In this workshop, students will collaborate on the creation of one of these plays, which explores the intersection of class and race. The point of this class will be to replicate as closely as possible Lee's process for developing a new play in a professional setting. Students will "learn by doing" as they serve as actors, assistant directors, and dramaturgs in the same way that her actual actors, assistant directors, and dramaturgs would do. Please note that this is not designed to be an acting class with lots of fun moving around. There is no guarantee that every student will have a chance to perform. Also, Lee's new play development process is challenging, slow, and often requires sitting around a table having gruelingly intense conversations for hours at a time. This class is designed to teach students skills they need to succeed in a professional theater environment. Please contact the instructor ASAP at yjl@stanford.edu for an application, which will be be due on March 1, with notifications being sent out on March 15. If you find out about this class after the application deadline and send the instructor an email asking her to allow you to apply late, you must present a convincing explanation for why an exception should be made in your case. Nobody who misses the first class will be permitted to take the course.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Lee, Y. (PI)

TAPS 278D: Editing a Full-Length Play (TAPS 178D)

To participate in this workshop, students must bring in a draft of a full length straight play for revision, which was written in part one of this course, WRITING A FULL-LENGTH PLAY. In conjunction with a variety of other editing techniques, students will focus on editing in collaboration with others. They will learn how to edit in response to hearing their plays read aloud; how to give and solicit the most useful kinds of feedback; how to cope with harsh criticism; what to do when people are offended by what they have written; how to know which notes to pay attention to and which notes to ignore; and how to let go of ideas and text that are not working. Other topics to be discussed: getting your work produced vs. self-producing; directing your own work vs. working with a director; and starting your own theater company. Enrollment for this course is closed.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Lee, Y. (PI)

TAPS 290: Special Research

Individual project on the work of a playwright, period, or genre.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

TAPS 292: Nitery Board Practicum (TAPS 192)

Credit given for student board members of the Experimental Nitery Studio. Undergraduate students should enroll in TAPS 192. Ph.D. students should enroll in TAPS 292.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Hill, L. (PI); Smith, M. (PI)

TAPS 314: Performing Identities (FEMGEN 314)

This course examines claims and counter-claims of identity, a heated political and cultural concept over the past few decades. We will consider the ways in which theories of performance have offered generative discursive frameworks for the study of identities, variously shaped by vectors of race, gender, sexuality, religion, class, nation, ethnicity, among others. How is identity as a social category different from identity as a unique and personal attribute of selfhood? Throughout the course we will focus on the inter-locking ways in which certain dimensions of identity become salient at particular historical conjunctures. In addition, we will consider the complex discourses of identity within transnational and historical frameworks. Readings include Robin Bernstein, Ann Pellegrini, Tavia Nyong¿o, Jose Munoz, Michael Taussig, Wendy Brown, Talal Asad, Jasbir Puar, among others.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Brody, J. (PI)

TAPS 315: Dramaturgy (TAPS 151)

In this seminar, we will take the conventional idea of dramaturgy for narrative performance as developed in Western European theater since the enlightenment, and investigate its relation to non-narrative forms of performance in 20th and 21st (performance art, conceptual dance). Further, we will use dramaturgical procedures to explore the ideological content of performance and position of art institutions in our society. Finally, the students will get acquainted with production dramaturgy and get necessary tools to take the role of dramaturgs in actual performance productions.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Jakovljevic, B. (PI)

TAPS 335: Introduction to Graduate Production

This course introduces first-year TAPS PhD student to the TAPS production process and resources. Meetings will be scheduled ad hoc.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Sunderman, E. (PI)

TAPS 356T: Intro to Psychoanalysis as a Critical Method (ENGLISH 356T)

Primary reading in Freud, Lacan, Laplanche, Irigaray and Kristeva. Secondary readings in film theory (Mulvey to Silverman), art history (Bryson, Bersani) and poststructuralism (Derrida, Foucault, Butler).
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Phelan, P. (PI)

TAPS 357: World Drama and Performance (TAPS 157)

This course takes up a geographically expansive conversation by looking at modern and contemporary drama from nations including Ghana, Egypt, India, Argentina, among others. Considering influential texts from the Global South will also enable us to explore a range of themes and methodologies that are radically re-shaping the field of Performance Studies. We will examine the relationship between colonialism and globalization, empire and capital, cosmopolitanism and neoliberalism. Re-situating our perspective from the Global South and the non-western world, we will ¿provincialize Europe¿ and probe the limits of its universalizing discourses.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Menon, J. (PI)

TAPS 377: Graduate Directors' Staged Reading Project

Presentation of a new or newly adapted work for the stage, in a mode employed in professional theater for the development of new plays. Two to four rehearsals. Public performance.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

TAPS 390: Directed Reading

Students may take directing reading only with the permission of their dissertation advisor. Might be repeatable for credit twice for 6 units total.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-6 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

TAPS 802: TGR Dissertation

(Staff)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 0 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: TGR
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