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AFRICAST 135: Designing Research-Based Interventions to Solve Global Health Problems (AFRICAST 235, EDUC 135, EDUC 335, HRP 235, HUMBIO 26, MED 235)

The excitement around social innovation and entrepreneurship has spawned numerous startups focused on tackling world problems, particularly in the fields of education and health. The best social ventures are launched with careful consideration paid to research, design, and efficacy. This course offers students insights into understanding how to effectively develop, evaluate, and scale social ventures. Using TeachAIDS (an award-winning nonprofit educational technology social venture used in 78 countries) as a primary case study, students will be given an in-depth look into how the entity was founded and scaled globally. Guest speakers will include world-class experts and entrepreneurs in Philanthropy, Medicine, Communications, Education, and Technology. Open to both undergraduate and graduate students.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

AFRICAST 141A: Science, Technology, and Medicine in Africa (ANTHRO 141A)

Africa is often depicted as a place simply in need of science, technology, andnmedicine. This class will introduce students to the culture and politics of science innsub-Saharan Africa: to the diverse and rich traditions, histories and contemporarynpredicaments of knowledge practices on the continent. We will consider the rolenof science in the colonial period, covering the expansion of European empires intonAfrica and the forms of technical knowledge that colonial governments encountered, especially as they relate to health and the environment. We will examine the role of science at African independence and in international development work. Finally, we will discuss the techno-politics of medical training and research, resource extraction, and the internet in contemporary Africa. This course will provide some important background for those with an applied interest in Africa as well as provide an introduction to a growing area of scholarship. Course materials include historical and ethnographic works, as well as primary sources and films emphasizing scientific practice in the context of geopolitical relations of power and inequality.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

AFRICAST 151: AIDS in Africa

Medical, social, and political aspects of the HIV epidemic in sub-Saharan Africa including: biology, transmission, diagnosis,and treatment of HIV; mother-to-child transmission and breastfeeding; vaccines; community and activist responses to the HIV epidemic; economics of HIV treatment; governance and health; ethics in research and program implementation.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

AFRICAST 235: Designing Research-Based Interventions to Solve Global Health Problems (AFRICAST 135, EDUC 135, EDUC 335, HRP 235, HUMBIO 26, MED 235)

The excitement around social innovation and entrepreneurship has spawned numerous startups focused on tackling world problems, particularly in the fields of education and health. The best social ventures are launched with careful consideration paid to research, design, and efficacy. This course offers students insights into understanding how to effectively develop, evaluate, and scale social ventures. Using TeachAIDS (an award-winning nonprofit educational technology social venture used in 78 countries) as a primary case study, students will be given an in-depth look into how the entity was founded and scaled globally. Guest speakers will include world-class experts and entrepreneurs in Philanthropy, Medicine, Communications, Education, and Technology. Open to both undergraduate and graduate students.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

ANES 207: Medical Acupuncture

Acupuncture is part of a comprehensive system of traditional Chinese Medicine developed over the past two millennia. This course reviews the history and theoretical basis of acupuncture for the treatment of various diseases as well as for the alleviation of pain. Issues related to the incorporation of acupuncture into the current health care system and the efficacy of acupuncture in treating various diseases are addressed. Includes practical, hands-on sections.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Golianu, B. (PI)

ANTHRO 137A: Traditional Medicine in the Modern World

This class considers "traditional medicine" in contemporary times. We will survey major systems of traditional medicine while considering their broader social, cultural, and political contexts. The class will study the symbolic uses of traditional medicine, the role of traditional medicines in early modern medical knowledge, the place of indigenous knowledge in bioprospecting, health-seeking behavior and medical pluralism, and the WHO's approach to traditional medicine and how it has affected government health policies. The class emphasizes a critical approach to the concepts of tradition and modernity, and an understanding of traditional medicine as a changing, flexible, and globalized category of healing.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ANTHRO 141A: Science, Technology, and Medicine in Africa (AFRICAST 141A)

Africa is often depicted as a place simply in need of science, technology, andnmedicine. This class will introduce students to the culture and politics of science innsub-Saharan Africa: to the diverse and rich traditions, histories and contemporarynpredicaments of knowledge practices on the continent. We will consider the rolenof science in the colonial period, covering the expansion of European empires intonAfrica and the forms of technical knowledge that colonial governments encountered, especially as they relate to health and the environment. We will examine the role of science at African independence and in international development work. Finally, we will discuss the techno-politics of medical training and research, resource extraction, and the internet in contemporary Africa. This course will provide some important background for those with an applied interest in Africa as well as provide an introduction to a growing area of scholarship. Course materials include historical and ethnographic works, as well as primary sources and films emphasizing scientific practice in the context of geopolitical relations of power and inequality.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ANTHRO 148: Health, Politics, and Culture of Modern China (ANTHRO 248)

One of the most generative regions for medical anthropology inquiry in recent years has been Asia. This seminar is designed to introduce upper division undergraduates and graduate students to the methodological hurdles, representational challenges, and intellectual rewards of investigating the intersections of health, politics, and culture in contemporary China.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ANTHRO 176: Cultures, Minds, and Medicine (ANTHRO 276)

This workshop aims to bring together scholars from the social sciences, humanities, medicine and bio-science and technology to explore the ways that health and illness are made through complex social forces. We aim for informal, interactive sessions, full of debate and good will. Dates of meetings will be listed in the notes section in the time schedule.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Luhrmann, T. (PI)

ANTHRO 178A: Culture, Narrative, and Medicine (HUMBIO 177C)

This course examines the ways in which medicine is practiced in diverse cultural contexts with narrative skills of recognizing, interpreting and being moved by the stories of illness. It is an examination of the human experience of illness and healing through narratives as presented in literature, film, and storytelling. We explore how cultural resources enable and empower healing and how narrative medicine can guide the practice of culturally competent medical care.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-CE, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ANTHRO 179: Cultures of Disease: Cancer and HIV/AIDS (ENGLISH 179)

History, politics, science, and anthropology of cancer; political and economic issues of disease and health care in the U.S., including the ethics and economics of health care provision, the pharmaceutical industry, carcinogen production, and research priorities.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ANTHRO 179A: Health, Illness, and Healing in South Asia (ANTHRO 279A)

This course has three related goals pertinent to medicine and healing in South Asia. The first is to understand the experiences of illness, and therapy in ordinary South Asian communities. How do social and economic inequality, religious commitments, available healing traditions, and community and family contexts shape the experience of illness and healing? The second goal is to think about South Asian medical systems using a broad historical perspective. How had biomedicine been used during the colonial period to manage the health of native populations? What is the legacy of this colonial history on current practices? What happens when South Asian medical traditions (such as Ayurveda) become global? Third, we will explore crucial health problems in South Asia from the perspective of medical anthropology. Possible topics for the third portion of the course include: child birth and maternal health, sex-selection technologies, malnutrition, metabolic diseases, the selling of organs, medical tourism, tuberculosis, HIV, suicide, and schizophrenia.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ANTHRO 182A: Down and Out: Marginal Lives and Institutional Technologies (ANTHRO 282A)

This course examines the neglect and management of socially marginalized persons including the mentally ill, youth runaways, child wards of the state, drug addicts and prisoners. In this course, we will approach the concept of marginality by investigating the spaces and institutions of decay, neglect and rehabilitation to which unwanted and indigent individuals are relegated. Readings are focused on qualitative research conducted within institutions of health, welfare, and reform. There will be two comparative public mental health sections in this course: one focused on South Asia and the second on Africa. This course is relevant for students interested in medical anthropology, applied anthropology, public health policy, or clinical careers in medicine, psychology, or social work.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ANTHRO 182N: Smoke and Mirrors in Global Health

A few years ago, health experts began calling out tobacco as engendering a global health crisis, categorizing the cigarette as the world's greatest weapon of mass destruction. A "global health crisis"? What merits that title if not tobacco use? A hundred million people were killed by tobacco in the 20th century, and ten times that number ¿ a billion people ¿ are predicted to die prematurely from exposure to cigarette smoke over the next hundred years. How has tobacconcome to be labeled a global health crisis over the last decade and what has been the political response? From whence does activism and ongoing complacency regarding tobacco arise? How are they created in different cultural contexts?nnThis course aims to provide students conceptual tools to tackle two specific thought projects: (1) to understand how institutional actors compete to define a situation in the world today as a problem of global health, and (2) to understand the sociocultural means by which something highly dangerous to health such as the cigarette is made both politically contentious and inert. On both fronts, special attention will be given to the ways global health activism and complacency unfold in the U.S. and China.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ANTHRO 185: Medical Anthropology of Contemporary Africa (ANTHRO 285)

In this course we will examine the place of Africa in global health discourses while reading in-depth histories and ethnographies of the varied causes and consequences of some of the most difficult problems facing African countries today. We will study the effects of colonialism and conflict on health, explore the military and humanitarian connections in the fight against HIV/AIDS, weigh the risks and benefits of population genetic studies on African populations, examine biomedical interventions on, and erasures of, local health problems, and query the role of violence, memory, insecurity, and power in daily life on the continent.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ANTHRO 248: Health, Politics, and Culture of Modern China (ANTHRO 148)

One of the most generative regions for medical anthropology inquiry in recent years has been Asia. This seminar is designed to introduce upper division undergraduates and graduate students to the methodological hurdles, representational challenges, and intellectual rewards of investigating the intersections of health, politics, and culture in contemporary China.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ANTHRO 276: Cultures, Minds, and Medicine (ANTHRO 176)

This workshop aims to bring together scholars from the social sciences, humanities, medicine and bio-science and technology to explore the ways that health and illness are made through complex social forces. We aim for informal, interactive sessions, full of debate and good will. Dates of meetings will be listed in the notes section in the time schedule.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Luhrmann, T. (PI)

ANTHRO 279A: Health, Illness, and Healing in South Asia (ANTHRO 179A)

This course has three related goals pertinent to medicine and healing in South Asia. The first is to understand the experiences of illness, and therapy in ordinary South Asian communities. How do social and economic inequality, religious commitments, available healing traditions, and community and family contexts shape the experience of illness and healing? The second goal is to think about South Asian medical systems using a broad historical perspective. How had biomedicine been used during the colonial period to manage the health of native populations? What is the legacy of this colonial history on current practices? What happens when South Asian medical traditions (such as Ayurveda) become global? Third, we will explore crucial health problems in South Asia from the perspective of medical anthropology. Possible topics for the third portion of the course include: child birth and maternal health, sex-selection technologies, malnutrition, metabolic diseases, the selling of organs, medical tourism, tuberculosis, HIV, suicide, and schizophrenia.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ANTHRO 282A: Down and Out: Marginal Lives and Institutional Technologies (ANTHRO 182A)

This course examines the neglect and management of socially marginalized persons including the mentally ill, youth runaways, child wards of the state, drug addicts and prisoners. In this course, we will approach the concept of marginality by investigating the spaces and institutions of decay, neglect and rehabilitation to which unwanted and indigent individuals are relegated. Readings are focused on qualitative research conducted within institutions of health, welfare, and reform. There will be two comparative public mental health sections in this course: one focused on South Asia and the second on Africa. This course is relevant for students interested in medical anthropology, applied anthropology, public health policy, or clinical careers in medicine, psychology, or social work.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ANTHRO 285: Medical Anthropology of Contemporary Africa (ANTHRO 185)

In this course we will examine the place of Africa in global health discourses while reading in-depth histories and ethnographies of the varied causes and consequences of some of the most difficult problems facing African countries today. We will study the effects of colonialism and conflict on health, explore the military and humanitarian connections in the fight against HIV/AIDS, weigh the risks and benefits of population genetic studies on African populations, examine biomedical interventions on, and erasures of, local health problems, and query the role of violence, memory, insecurity, and power in daily life on the continent.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

BIOE 70Q: Medical Device Innovation

BIOE 70Q invites students to apply design thinking to the creation of healthcare technologies. Students will learn about the variety of factors that shape healthcare innovation, and through hands-on design projects, invent their own solutions to clinical needs. Guest instructors will include engineers, doctors, entrepreneurs, and others who have helped bring ideas from concept to clinical use.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

BIOE 371: Global Biodesign: Medical Technology in an International Context (MED 271)

This course (BIOE 371, OIT 587, MED 271) examines the challenges and opportunities of developing and implementing innovative medical technologies to help patients around the world. Faculty and guest speakers discuss the status of the global health technology industry, as well as trends and issues affecting health technology innovation in seven primary geographic regions: Africa, China, Europe, India, Japan, Latin America, and the United States. Students explore key differences between the covered geographies, which range from emerging markets with vast bottom-of-the-pyramid and growing middle class populations, to well-established markets with sophisticated demands and shifting demographics. The course utilizes real-world case studies and class projects to promote engagement and provide a hands-on learning experience. Students work in multidisciplinary teams with real-world companies to develop a plan for bringing an existing product to a new global market. Teams will interact with representatives from their chosen company throughout the quarter, as well as with a faculty mentor, and present their recommendations at the conclusion of spring term.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

BIOE 372: Design for Service Innovation (HRP 274, MED 274)

(Same as OIT 343/01) Open to graduate students from all schools and departments. An experiential project course in which students work in multidisciplinary teams to design new services to address the needs of medically patients. Project teams partner with "safety net" hospitals and clinics to find better ways to deliver care to the low income and uninsured patients these institutions serve. Students learn proven innovation processes from experienced GSB, d. school, and SoM faculty, interface with students from across the university, and have the opportunity to see their ideas translated into improvements in the quality and efficiency of healthcare in the real world. Prerequisite: admission to the course is by application only. Applications available at http://DesignForService.stanford.edu. Applications must be submitted by November 16, 2011.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

BIOE 374A: Biodesign Innovation: Needs Finding and Concept Creation (ME 368A, MED 272A)

In this two-quarter course series (BIOE 374A/B, MED 272A/B, ME 368A/B, OIT 384/5), multidisciplinary student teams identify real-world unmet healthcare needs, invent new medtech products to address them, and plan for their development into patient care. During the first quarter (winter 2017), students select and characterize an important unmet healthcare problem, validate it through primary interviews and secondary research, and then brainstorm and screen initial technology-based solutions. In the second quarter (spring 2017), teams select a lead solution and move it toward the market through prototyping, technical re-risking, strategies to address healthcare-specific requirements (regulation, reimbursement), and business planning. Final presentations in winter and spring are made to a panel of prominent medtech experts and investors. Class sessions include faculty-led instruction and case demonstrations, coaching sessions by industry specialists, expert guest lecturers, and interactive team meetings. Enrollment is by application only, and students are expected to participate in both quarters of the course. Visit http://biodesign.stanford.edu/programs/stanford-courses/biodesign-innovation.html to access the application, examples of past projects, and student testimonials. More information about Stanford Biodesign, which has led to the creation of more than 40 venture-backed healthcare companies and has helped hundreds of student launch health technology careers, can be found at http://biodesign.stanford.edu/.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

CEE 70N: Water, Public Health, and Engineering

Preference to frosh. Linkages between water, wastewater and public health, with an emphasis on engineering interventions. Topics include the history of water and wastewater infrastructure development in the U.S. and Europe; evolution of epidemiological approaches for water-related health challenges; biological and chemical contaminants in water and wastewater and their management; and current trends and challenges in access to water and sanitation around the world. Identifying ways in which freshwater contributes to human health; exposure routes for water- and sanitation-illness. Classifying illnesses by pathogen type and their geographic distribution. Identifying the health and economic consequences of water- and sanitation-related illnesses; costs and benefits of curative and preventative interventions. Interpreting data related to epidemiological and environmental concepts. No previous experience in engineering is required.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CEE 177S: Design for a Sustainable World (CEE 277S)

Technology-based problems faced by developing communities worldwide. Student groups partner with organizations abroad to work on concept, feasibility, design, implementation, and evaluation phases of various projects. Past projects include a water and health initiative, a green school design, seismic safety, and medical device. Admission based on written application and interview. See http://esw.stanford.edu for application. (Staff)
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CEE 265D: Water and Sanitation in Developing Countries (CEE 165D)

Economic, social, political, and technical aspects of sustainable water supply and sanitation service provision in developing countries. Service pricing, alternative institutional structures including privatization, and the role of consumer demand and community participation in the planning process. Environmental and public health considerations, and strategies for serving low-income households. Limited enrollment. Prerequisite: consent of instructor, see jennadavis.stanford.edu for application.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Davis, J. (PI)

CEE 277D: Water, Health & Development in Africa

Graduate seminar focused on emerging research in the areas of water supply, sanitation, hygiene and health in developing countries. Limited enrollment; instructor permission required.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

CEE 277S: Design for a Sustainable World (CEE 177S)

Technology-based problems faced by developing communities worldwide. Student groups partner with organizations abroad to work on concept, feasibility, design, implementation, and evaluation phases of various projects. Past projects include a water and health initiative, a green school design, seismic safety, and medical device. Admission based on written application and interview. See http://esw.stanford.edu for application. (Staff)
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CEE 374W: Advanced Topics in Water, Health and Development

Advanced topics in water, health and development. Emphasis on low-and-middle-income countries. Class content varies according to interests of students. Instructor consent required.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-18 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Davis, J. (PI)

COMPLIT 229: Literature and Global Health (AFRICAAM 229, AFRICAST 229, CSRE 129B, FRENCH 229, HUMBIO 175L, MED 234)

This course examines the ways writers in literature and medicine have used the narrative form to explore the ethics of care in what has been called the developing world. We will begin with a call made by the editor-in-chief of The Lancet for a literature of global health, namely fiction modeled on the social reform novels of the nineteenth century, understood to have helped readers develop a conscience for public health as the field emerged as a modern medical specialty. We will then spend the quarter understanding how colonial, postcolonial, and world literatures have answered and complicated this call. Readings will include prose fiction by Albert Camus, Joseph Conrad, Tsitsi Dangaremgba, Amitav Ghosh, Susan Sontag as well as physician memoirs featuring Frantz Fanon, Albert Schweitzer, Abraham Verghese, Paul Farmer. And each literary reading will be paired with medical, philosophical, and policy writings that deeply inform the field of global health.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-A-II, WAY-ER | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

COMPMED 84Q: Globally Emerging Zoonotic Diseases

Preference to sophomores. Infectious diseases impacting veterinary and human health around the world today. Mechanisms of disease, epidemiology, and underlying diagnostic, treatment and control principles associated with these pathogens.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: ; Felt, S. (PI)

CSRE 129B: Literature and Global Health (AFRICAAM 229, AFRICAST 229, COMPLIT 229, FRENCH 229, HUMBIO 175L, MED 234)

This course examines the ways writers in literature and medicine have used the narrative form to explore the ethics of care in what has been called the developing world. We will begin with a call made by the editor-in-chief of The Lancet for a literature of global health, namely fiction modeled on the social reform novels of the nineteenth century, understood to have helped readers develop a conscience for public health as the field emerged as a modern medical specialty. We will then spend the quarter understanding how colonial, postcolonial, and world literatures have answered and complicated this call. Readings will include prose fiction by Albert Camus, Joseph Conrad, Tsitsi Dangaremgba, Amitav Ghosh, Susan Sontag as well as physician memoirs featuring Frantz Fanon, Albert Schweitzer, Abraham Verghese, Paul Farmer. And each literary reading will be paired with medical, philosophical, and policy writings that deeply inform the field of global health.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-A-II, WAY-ER | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EASTASN 117: Health and Healthcare Systems in East Asia (EASTASN 217)

China, Japan, and both Koreas. Healthcare economics as applied to East Asian health policy, including economic development, population aging, infectious disease outbreaks (SARS, avian flu), social health insurance, health service delivery, payment incentives, competition, workforce policy, pharmaceutical industry, and regulation. No prior knowledge of economics or healthcare required.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Eggleston, K. (PI)

EASTASN 217: Health and Healthcare Systems in East Asia (EASTASN 117)

China, Japan, and both Koreas. Healthcare economics as applied to East Asian health policy, including economic development, population aging, infectious disease outbreaks (SARS, avian flu), social health insurance, health service delivery, payment incentives, competition, workforce policy, pharmaceutical industry, and regulation. No prior knowledge of economics or healthcare required.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Eggleston, K. (PI)

ECON 118: Development Economics

The microeconomic problems and policy concerns of less developed countries. Topics include: health and education; risk and insurance; microfinance; agriculture; technology; governance. Emphasis is on economic models and empirical evidence. Prerequisites: 51, 102B.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Dupas, P. (PI)

ECON 127: Economics of Health Improvement in Developing Countries (MED 262)

Application of economic paradigms and empirical methods to health improvement in developing countries. Emphasis is on unifying analytic frameworks and evaluation of empirical evidence. How economic views differ from public health, medicine, and epidemiology; analytic paradigms for health and population change; the demand for health; the role of health in international development. Prerequisites: ECON 50 and ECON 102B.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

ECON 215: Development Economics II

This is a course focusing on macro development research. It will cover dynamic models of growth and development, with a focus on migration; technological change; the functioning of financial markets; and barriers to agricultural productivity in less developed countries. Prerequisites: 202 or 202N, 270.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Morten, M. (PI)

EE 46: Engineering For Good: Save the World and Have Fun Doing It

Projects that provide immediate and positive impact on the world. Focus is on global health by learning from experts in this field. Students work on real-world projects with help from members of NGOs and social entrepreneurial companies as part of the hand-on learning experience. Prerequisite: ENGR 40 or EE 122A or CS 106B or consent of instructor.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

FAMMED 244: Ethnicity and Medicine (HUMBIO 121E)

Weekly lecture series. Examines the linguistic, social class, and cultural factors that impact patient care. Presentations promote culturally sensitive health care services and review contemporary research issues involving minority and underserved populations. Topics include health care inequities and medical practices of African Americans, Asians, Latinos, Native Americans, immigrants, and refugees in both urban and rural settings. 1 unit requires weekly lecture attendance, completion of required readings, completion of response questions; 2 units requires weekly lecture attendance and discussion session, completion of required readings and weekly response questions; additional requirement for 3 units (HUMBIO only) is completion of a significant term paper Only students taking the course for 3 units may request a letter grade. Enrollment limited to students with sophomore academic standing or above.This course must be taken for a minimum of 3 units to be eligible for Ways credit.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-3 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: ; Garcia, R. (PI)

FEMGEN 129: Critical Issues in International Women's Health (HUMBIO 129)

Women's lives, from childhood through adolescence, reproductive years, and aging. Economic, social, and human rights factors, and the importance of women's capacities to have good health and manage their lives in the face of societal pressures and obstacles. Emphasis is on life or death issues of women's health that depend on women's capacity to exercise their human rghts including maternal mortality, violence, HIV/AIDS, reproductive health, and sex trafficking. Organizations addressing these issues. A requirement of this class is participation in public blogs. Prerequisites: Human Biology core or equivalent or consent of instructor.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

FEMGEN 206: Global Medical Issues Affecting Women (SOMGEN 206)

This course probes the principal issues affecting women and girls medically around the world. Through interactive discussions, guest lectures, case studies, and academic readings, students become acquainted with the most critical challenges to women¿s health globally, and use selected analytical tools to assess how these may be addressed efficiently, cost-effectively, and sustainably. Topics include women¿s cancer, birth control, infertility, female genital mutilation, midwifery, obstetric fistula, breastfeeding, violence against women, and women's representation in biomedical research. The aim is to cultivate in students a nuanced appreciation of women¿s unique needs, roles, and challenges in the contemporary global health landscape.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 1 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

FRENCH 229: Literature and Global Health (AFRICAAM 229, AFRICAST 229, COMPLIT 229, CSRE 129B, HUMBIO 175L, MED 234)

This course examines the ways writers in literature and medicine have used the narrative form to explore the ethics of care in what has been called the developing world. We will begin with a call made by the editor-in-chief of The Lancet for a literature of global health, namely fiction modeled on the social reform novels of the nineteenth century, understood to have helped readers develop a conscience for public health as the field emerged as a modern medical specialty. We will then spend the quarter understanding how colonial, postcolonial, and world literatures have answered and complicated this call. Readings will include prose fiction by Albert Camus, Joseph Conrad, Tsitsi Dangaremgba, Amitav Ghosh, Susan Sontag as well as physician memoirs featuring Frantz Fanon, Albert Schweitzer, Abraham Verghese, Paul Farmer. And each literary reading will be paired with medical, philosophical, and policy writings that deeply inform the field of global health.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-A-II, WAY-ER | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HRP 89Q: Introduction to Cross Cultural Issues in Medicine

Preference to sophomores. Introduction to social factors that impact health care delivery, such as ethnicity, immigration, language barriers, and patient service expectations. Focus is on developing a framework to understand culturally unique and non-English speaking populations in the health care system.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-AmerCul | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Corso, I. (PI)

HRP 207: Introduction to Concepts and Methods in Health Services and Policy Research I

Primarily for medical students in the Health Services and Policy Research scholarly concentration. Topics include health economics, statistics, decision analysis, study design, quality measurement, cost benefit and effectiveness analysis, and evidence based guidelines.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Haberland, C. (PI)

HRP 208: Introduction to Concepts and Methods in Health Services and Policy Research II

Primarily for medical students in the Health Services and Policy Research scholarly concentration; continuation of 207. Topics include health economics, statistics, decision analysis, study design, quality measurement, cost benefit and effectiveness analysis, and evidence based guidelines. Recommended: 207.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: ; Haberland, C. (PI)

HRP 212: Cross Cultural Medicine

Developing interviewing and behavioral skills needed to facilitate culturally relevant health care across all population groups. Discussions focus on explicit and implicit cultural influences operating in formal and informal medical contexts.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: ; Corso, I. (PI)

HRP 231: Epidemiology of Infectious Diseases

Principles of the transmission of the infectious agents (viruses, bacteria, rickettsiae, mycoplasma, fungi, and protozoan and helminth parasites). The role of vectors, reservoirs, and environmental factors. Pathogen and host characteristics that determine the spectrum of infection and disease. Endemicity, outbreaks, and epidemics of selected infectious diseases. Principles of control and surveillance.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

HRP 237: Practical Approaches to Global Health Research (IPS 290, MED 226)

How do you come up with an idea for health research overseas? How do you develop a research question, concept note, and get your project funded? How do you manage personnel in the field, difficult cultural situations, or unexpected problems? How do you create a sampling strategy, select a study design, and ensure ethical conduct with human subjects? This course takes students through the process of health research in under-resourced countries from the development of the initial research question and literature review to securing support and detailed planning for field work. Students progressively develop and receive weekly feedback on a concept note to support a funding proposal addressing a research question of their choosing. Aims at graduate students; undergraduates in their junior or senior year may enroll with instructor consent. This course is restricted to undergraduates unless they have completed 85 units or more.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: ; Luby, S. (PI); Arthur, R. (TA)

HUMBIO 26: Designing Research-Based Interventions to Solve Global Health Problems (AFRICAST 135, AFRICAST 235, EDUC 135, EDUC 335, HRP 235, MED 235)

The excitement around social innovation and entrepreneurship has spawned numerous startups focused on tackling world problems, particularly in the fields of education and health. The best social ventures are launched with careful consideration paid to research, design, and efficacy. This course offers students insights into understanding how to effectively develop, evaluate, and scale social ventures. Using TeachAIDS (an award-winning nonprofit educational technology social venture used in 78 countries) as a primary case study, students will be given an in-depth look into how the entity was founded and scaled globally. Guest speakers will include world-class experts and entrepreneurs in Philanthropy, Medicine, Communications, Education, and Technology. Open to both undergraduate and graduate students.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

HUMBIO 114: Environmental Change and Emerging Infectious Diseases (ANTHRO 177, ANTHRO 277)

The changing epidemiological environment. How human-induced environmental changes, such as global warming, deforestation and land-use conversion, urbanization, international commerce, and human migration, are altering the ecology of infectious disease transmission, and promoting their re-emergence as a global public health threat. Case studies of malaria, cholera, hantavirus, plague, and HIV.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HUMBIO 121: Critical Issues in Child Health

Integrated picture of the physical and psychosocial health factors that result in a healthy child building on principles taught in the Human Biology core. Students apply basic human physiology to the physiology of the child to develop perspective on global pediatric health challenges and how the cultural context influences and defines the child living within it. Prerequisite: Human Biology Core or equivalent or consent of instructor. Enrollment will be limited and preference given to Seniors.
Terms: Spr, not given next year | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Adam, M. (PI)

HUMBIO 121E: Ethnicity and Medicine (FAMMED 244)

Weekly lecture series. Examines the linguistic, social class, and cultural factors that impact patient care. Presentations promote culturally sensitive health care services and review contemporary research issues involving minority and underserved populations. Topics include health care inequities and medical practices of African Americans, Asians, Latinos, Native Americans, immigrants, and refugees in both urban and rural settings. 1 unit requires weekly lecture attendance, completion of required readings, completion of response questions; 2 units requires weekly lecture attendance and discussion session, completion of required readings and weekly response questions; additional requirement for 3 units (HUMBIO only) is completion of a significant term paper Only students taking the course for 3 units may request a letter grade. Enrollment limited to students with sophomore academic standing or above.This course must be taken for a minimum of 3 units to be eligible for Ways credit.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: ; Garcia, R. (PI)

HUMBIO 122M: Challenges of Human Migration: Health and Health Care of Migrants and Autochthonous Populations (PEDS 212)

(Undergraduate students must enroll in HUMBIO 122M. MD and Graduate students enroll in PEDS 212) An emerging area of inquiry. Topics include: global migration trends, health Issues/aspects of migration, healthcare and the needs of immigrants in the US, and migrants as healthcare providers: a new area of inquiry in the US. Class is structured to include: lectures lead by the instructor and possible guest speakers; seminar, discussion and case study sessions led by students. Upper division course with preference given to upperclassmen.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: ; Rodriguez, E. (PI)

HUMBIO 122S: Social Class, Race, Ethnicity, and Health (AFRICAAM 132)

Examines health disparities in the U.S., looking at the patterns of those disparities and their root causes. Explores the intersection of lower social class and ethnic minority status in affecting health status and access to health care. Compares social and biological conceptualizations of race and ethnicity. Upper division course with preference given to upperclassmen.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Barr, D. (PI)

HUMBIO 124C: Global Child Health

This course will introduce key challenges to the health and wellbeing of children worldwide, with a particular focus on children in low- and middle-income countries. It will review the leading causes of morbidity and mortality, identify interventions to address some of the biggest child health problems, and provide an overview of the roles of culture, gender, and civil society on child health and health policy. Upper division course with preference given to upperclassmen.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

HUMBIO 124E: Economics of Infectious Disease and Global Health (MED 236)

Introduction to global health topics such as childhood health, hygiene, drug resistance, and pharmaceutical industries from an economic development perspective. Introduces economic concepts including decision-making over time, externalities, and incentives as they relate to health. Prerequisite: Human Biology Core or equivalent or consent of the instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Alsan, M. (PI)

HUMBIO 129: Critical Issues in International Women's Health (FEMGEN 129)

Women's lives, from childhood through adolescence, reproductive years, and aging. Economic, social, and human rights factors, and the importance of women's capacities to have good health and manage their lives in the face of societal pressures and obstacles. Emphasis is on life or death issues of women's health that depend on women's capacity to exercise their human rghts including maternal mortality, violence, HIV/AIDS, reproductive health, and sex trafficking. Organizations addressing these issues. A requirement of this class is participation in public blogs. Prerequisites: Human Biology core or equivalent or consent of instructor.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

HUMBIO 129S: Global Public Health

The class is an introduction to the fields of international public health and global medicine. It focuses on resource poor areas of the world and explores major global health problems and their relation to policy, economic development and human rights. The course is intended for students interested in global health, development studies, or international relations, and provides opportunities for in-depth discussion and interaction with experts in the field. Upper division course with preference given to upperclassmen.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

HUMBIO 129W: Health Care Systems Around the World (MED 129)

This course will explore the role of health care systems in societies around the world, identifying the common challenges facing health care systems and how different institutional structures in different countries perform in response to these challenges. We will structure the course around general conceptual frameworks related to key health system institutions (including financing, insurance, provider payment, patient cost-sharing, and the regulation of medical technology). From this foundation, we will draw on the experience of individual countries (high and low income, with heavy chronic disease and infectious disease burdens) to illustrate the function of these institutions under real-world circumstances observed around the globe. Prerequisite: Human Biology Core or equivalent or consent of instructor.
Terms: alternate years, given next year | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HUMBIO 153: Parasites and Pestilence: Infectious Public Health Challenges

Parasitic and other pestilence of public health importance. Pathogenesis, clinical syndromes, complex life cycles, and the interplay among environment, vectors, hosts, and reservoirs in historical context. Public health policy initiatives aimed at halting disease transmission. World Health Organization tropical disease targets including river blindness, sleeping sickness, leishmaniasis, schistosomiasis, mycobacterial disease (tuberculosis and leprosy), malaria, toxoplasmosis, dracunculiais, and intestinal helminthes. Guest lecturers with expertise in disease control. Prerequisite: Human Biology core or equivalent, or consent of instructor.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HUMBIO 154A: Engineering Better Health Systems: modeling for public health (CHPR 254, HRP 234)

This course teaches engineering, operations research and modeling techniques to improve public health programs and systems. Students will engage in in-depth study of disease detection and control strategies from a "systems science" perspective, which involves the use of common engineering, operations research, and mathematical modeling techniques such as optimization, queuing theory, Markov and Kermack-McKendrick models, and microsimulation. Lectures and problem sets will focus on applying these techniques to classical public health dilemmas such as how to optimize screening programs, reduce waiting times for healthcare services, solve resource allocation problems, and compare macro-scale disease control strategies that cannot be easily evaluated through randomized trials. Readings will complement the lectures and problem sets by offering critical perspectives from the public health history, sociology, and epidemiology. In-depth case studies from non-governmental organizations, departments of public health, and international agencies will drive the course. Prerequisites: A course in introductory statistics, and a course in multivariable calculus including ordinarily differential equations. Open to upper-division undergraduate students and graduate students. Human Biology majors enroll in HUMBIO 154A.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Basu, S. (PI)

HUMBIO 175L: Literature and Global Health (AFRICAAM 229, AFRICAST 229, COMPLIT 229, CSRE 129B, FRENCH 229, MED 234)

This course examines the ways writers in literature and medicine have used the narrative form to explore the ethics of care in what has been called the developing world. We will begin with a call made by the editor-in-chief of The Lancet for a literature of global health, namely fiction modeled on the social reform novels of the nineteenth century, understood to have helped readers develop a conscience for public health as the field emerged as a modern medical specialty. We will then spend the quarter understanding how colonial, postcolonial, and world literatures have answered and complicated this call. Readings will include prose fiction by Albert Camus, Joseph Conrad, Tsitsi Dangaremgba, Amitav Ghosh, Susan Sontag as well as physician memoirs featuring Frantz Fanon, Albert Schweitzer, Abraham Verghese, Paul Farmer. And each literary reading will be paired with medical, philosophical, and policy writings that deeply inform the field of global health.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-A-II, WAY-ER | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HUMBIO 177C: Culture, Narrative, and Medicine (ANTHRO 178A)

This course examines the ways in which medicine is practiced in diverse cultural contexts with narrative skills of recognizing, interpreting and being moved by the stories of illness. It is an examination of the human experience of illness and healing through narratives as presented in literature, film, and storytelling. We explore how cultural resources enable and empower healing and how narrative medicine can guide the practice of culturally competent medical care.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-CE, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

IPS 290: Practical Approaches to Global Health Research (HRP 237, MED 226)

How do you come up with an idea for health research overseas? How do you develop a research question, concept note, and get your project funded? How do you manage personnel in the field, difficult cultural situations, or unexpected problems? How do you create a sampling strategy, select a study design, and ensure ethical conduct with human subjects? This course takes students through the process of health research in under-resourced countries from the development of the initial research question and literature review to securing support and detailed planning for field work. Students progressively develop and receive weekly feedback on a concept note to support a funding proposal addressing a research question of their choosing. Aims at graduate students; undergraduates in their junior or senior year may enroll with instructor consent. This course is restricted to undergraduates unless they have completed 85 units or more.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: ; Luby, S. (PI); Arthur, R. (TA)

MED 108Q: Human Rights and Health

Preference to sophomores. History of human-rights law. International conventions and treaties on human rights as background for social and political changes that could improve the health of groups and individuals. Topics such as: regional conflict and health, the health status of refugees and internally displaced persons; child labor; trafficking in women and children; HIV/AIDS; torture; poverty, the environment and health; access to clean water; domestic violence and sexual assault; and international availability of drugs. Possible optional opportunities to observe at community sites where human rights and health are issues. Guest speakers from national and international NGOs including Doctors Without Borders; McMaster University Institute for Peace Studies; UC Berkeley Human Rights Center; Kiva. PowerPoint presentation on topic of choice required.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Laws, A. (PI)

MED 157: Foundations for Community Health Engagement

Open to undergraduate, graduate, and MD students. Examination and exploration of community health principles and their application at the local level. Designed to prepare students to make substantive contributions in a variety of community health settings (e.g. clinics, government agencies, non-profit organization, advocacy groups). Topics include community health assessment; health disparities; health promotion and disease prevention; strategies for working with diverse, low-income, and underserved populations; and principles of ethical and effective community engagement.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

MED 226: Practical Approaches to Global Health Research (HRP 237, IPS 290)

How do you come up with an idea for health research overseas? How do you develop a research question, concept note, and get your project funded? How do you manage personnel in the field, difficult cultural situations, or unexpected problems? How do you create a sampling strategy, select a study design, and ensure ethical conduct with human subjects? This course takes students through the process of health research in under-resourced countries from the development of the initial research question and literature review to securing support and detailed planning for field work. Students progressively develop and receive weekly feedback on a concept note to support a funding proposal addressing a research question of their choosing. Aims at graduate students; undergraduates in their junior or senior year may enroll with instructor consent. This course is restricted to undergraduates unless they have completed 85 units or more.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: ; Luby, S. (PI); Arthur, R. (TA)

MED 228: Physicians and Social Responsibility

Social and political context of the roles of physicians and health professionals in social change; policy, advocacy, and shaping public attitudes. How physicians have influenced governmental policy on nuclear arms proliferation; environmental health concerns; physicians in government; activism through research; the effects of poverty on health; homelessness; and gun violence. Guest speakers from national and international NGOs.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Laws, A. (PI)

MED 232: Discussions in Global Health

The goal of this interactive series is to encourage students to think broadly about the variety of activities encompassed within global health and the roles of various entities, including NGOs, governments, and healthcare providers, in responding to large-scale health crises, building health systems, and caring for patients in developing countries. Examines challenges in global health such as organizing medical responses to natural disasters, providing healthcare to societies in conflict, and integrating traditional and modern approaches to healing. Case studies are used to critique strategies employed by organizations that work to improve medical care in poor settings.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Barry, M. (PI); Hyde, E. (TA)

MED 233: Global Health: Beyond Diseases and International Organizations

Provides multidisciplinary trainees insight into over-arching themes of global health. Topics include systemic issues affecting healthcare progress globally, ethical and thoughtful approaches to solving these issues, as well as economics, water sanitation, public health, organizations in global health, human rights, involvement in NGOs, ethics of overseas work, and other non-medical aspects of this subject. This course will cover some of the essentials of patient care while working in the field as well including child health care, malaria, TB, and HIV.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

MED 234: Literature and Global Health (AFRICAAM 229, AFRICAST 229, COMPLIT 229, CSRE 129B, FRENCH 229, HUMBIO 175L)

This course examines the ways writers in literature and medicine have used the narrative form to explore the ethics of care in what has been called the developing world. We will begin with a call made by the editor-in-chief of The Lancet for a literature of global health, namely fiction modeled on the social reform novels of the nineteenth century, understood to have helped readers develop a conscience for public health as the field emerged as a modern medical specialty. We will then spend the quarter understanding how colonial, postcolonial, and world literatures have answered and complicated this call. Readings will include prose fiction by Albert Camus, Joseph Conrad, Tsitsi Dangaremgba, Amitav Ghosh, Susan Sontag as well as physician memoirs featuring Frantz Fanon, Albert Schweitzer, Abraham Verghese, Paul Farmer. And each literary reading will be paired with medical, philosophical, and policy writings that deeply inform the field of global health.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

MED 235: Designing Research-Based Interventions to Solve Global Health Problems (AFRICAST 135, AFRICAST 235, EDUC 135, EDUC 335, HRP 235, HUMBIO 26)

The excitement around social innovation and entrepreneurship has spawned numerous startups focused on tackling world problems, particularly in the fields of education and health. The best social ventures are launched with careful consideration paid to research, design, and efficacy. This course offers students insights into understanding how to effectively develop, evaluate, and scale social ventures. Using TeachAIDS (an award-winning nonprofit educational technology social venture used in 78 countries) as a primary case study, students will be given an in-depth look into how the entity was founded and scaled globally. Guest speakers will include world-class experts and entrepreneurs in Philanthropy, Medicine, Communications, Education, and Technology. Open to both undergraduate and graduate students.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

MED 236: Economics of Infectious Disease and Global Health (HUMBIO 124E)

Introduction to global health topics such as childhood health, hygiene, drug resistance, and pharmaceutical industries from an economic development perspective. Introduces economic concepts including decision-making over time, externalities, and incentives as they relate to health. Prerequisite: Human Biology Core or equivalent or consent of the instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Alsan, M. (PI)

MED 242: Physicians and Human Rights

Weekly lectures on how human rights violations affect health. Topics include: regional conflict and health, the health status of refugees and internally displaced persons; child labor; trafficking in women and children; HIV/AIDS; torture; poverty, the environment and health; access to clean water; domestic violence and sexual assault; and international availability of drugs. Guest speakers from national and international NGOs including Doctors Without Borders; McMaster University Institute for Peace Studies; UC Berkeley Human Rights Center; Kiva.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Laws, A. (PI)

MED 262: Economics of Health Improvement in Developing Countries (ECON 127)

Application of economic paradigms and empirical methods to health improvement in developing countries. Emphasis is on unifying analytic frameworks and evaluation of empirical evidence. How economic views differ from public health, medicine, and epidemiology; analytic paradigms for health and population change; the demand for health; the role of health in international development. Prerequisites: ECON 50 and ECON 102B.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

OIT 333: Design for Extreme Affordability

This course is a Bass Seminar. Project course jointly offered by School of Engineering and Graduate School of Business. Students apply engineering and business skills to design product or service prototypes, distribution systems, and business plans for entrepreneurial ventures that meet that challenges faced by the world's poor. Topics include user empathy, appropriate technology design, rapid prototype engineering and testing, social technology entrepreneurship, business modeling, and project management. Weekly design reviews; final course presentation. Industry and adviser interaction. Limited enrollment via application; see http://extreme.stanford.edu/index.html for details.
Units: 4 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded

OSPCPTWN 24A: Targeted Research Project in Community Health and Development

Two-quarter sequence for students engaging in Cape Town-sponsored community based research. Introduction to approaches, methods and critical issues of partnership-based, community-engaged research and to the community-based research partners. Qualitative data gathering and analysis methods in community-based research; effective collaboration with community partners and data sources; race and privilege in community-based research. Preparation of research proposals and plans for research carried out during the second quarter through OSPCPTWN 24B.
Terms: Win, Sum | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

OSPCPTWN 24B: Targeted Research Project in Community Health and Development

Two-quarter sequence for students engaging in Cape Town-sponsored community-based research. Substantive community health or development investigations in collaboration with the Stanford Centre's community partners: Western Cape NGOs or government agencies, or community-based organizations or groups. Students' research supported through methods workshops, sharing of progress and problems, and data and findings presentations. Prerequisite: OSPCPTWN 24A.
Terms: Sum | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Meehan, T. (PI)

OSPCPTWN 43: Public and Community Health in Sub-Saharan Africa

Introduction to concept of public health as compared with clinical medicine. Within a public health context, the broad distribution of health problems in sub-Saharan Africa as compared with U.S. and Europe. In light of South Africa's status as a new democracy, changes that have occurred in health legislation, policy, and service arenas in past 16 years. Topics include: sector health care delivery, current distribution of infectious and chronic diseases, and issues related to sexual and reproductive health in South Africa. Site visits to public sector health services and health related NGOs.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-GlobalCom | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

OSPCPTWN 57: Directed Study in Health Systems and Policy

Directed study projects focusing on some aspect of health systems and policy in the Southern African context. Example topics include analysis of: local HIV control policies; the South African health care system; health care delivery patterns; investments in health infrastructure as an enabler of health care delivery; health systems strengthening and concomitant improvements in population health; and social networks and influences in disease risk. Students will be expected to write an in-depth term paper that carefully analyzes the problem under consideration. Analyses that include the development of mathematical or analytical models are encouraged.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 1-3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

OSPGEN 259: Community Health in Oaxaca

Continuation of MED 259. Close observation of clinicians at work in community health settings in Oaxaca and service with local community health organizations. Combination of classroom study and discussion with cultural immersion, language training, clinical shadowing, and community service. Topics include: Mexican healthcare system; cultural, socioeconomic and educational factors impacting health of Mexicans and Mexican immigrants to U.S.; Mexican cultural and health beliefs; Mexican migration as a multi-ethnic process. Prerequisite: Acceptance into program and successful completion of MED 259 (Spring quarter 2015)
Terms: Sum | Units: 2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Garcia, G. (PI)

PEDS 212: Challenges of Human Migration: Health and Health Care of Migrants and Autochthonous Populations (HUMBIO 122M)

(Undergraduate students must enroll in HUMBIO 122M. MD and Graduate students enroll in PEDS 212) An emerging area of inquiry. Topics include: global migration trends, health Issues/aspects of migration, healthcare and the needs of immigrants in the US, and migrants as healthcare providers: a new area of inquiry in the US. Class is structured to include: lectures lead by the instructor and possible guest speakers; seminar, discussion and case study sessions led by students. Upper division course with preference given to upperclassmen.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: ; Rodriguez, E. (PI)

PEDS 223: Human Rights and Global Health

Open to medical students, graduate students, and advanced undergraduates. Examines the newly emerging field of human rights and global health, beginning with the essential background into the field of human rights, and the recent emergence of health as a human right. Emphasis is on the pioneering work of Dr. Paul Farmer and Partners in Health and the challenge he and his organization have posed to the conventional wisdom about approaches to combating poor health and disease worldwide. Topics include the "big three" infectious diseases -- tuberculosis, malaria, and HIV/AIDS -- as well as emerging infectious diseases, clean water and sanitation, and malnutrition and famine.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: ; Patenaude, B. (PI)

PSYC 51Q: Culture, Psychology, and Mental Health Treatment

Focuses on a critical analysis of Western approach to psychology and psychiatric terms of understanding mental illness, psychiatric phenomena, and treatment of mental health disorders. Includes an orientation to and critique of western clinical psychology/psychiatry and an inquity as to its relevance outside Western settings. Includes guest speakers representing cross-cultural providers of mental health services as well as medical anthropologists and critics of the Western generalizations in psychiatry. Special attention place on cross-cultural psychiatry and international mental health efforts.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Reicherter, D. (PI)

PSYC 70N: Mind-Body Medicine: A Global Perspective

Explores ways in which the powerful connection between the brain and the body can be harnessed to maintain health or fight disease.Intended for students who have a general interest in matters of mind and health, and students who are specifically interested in the psychological/biological/medical sciences. Course begins with a historical perspective on how diverse cultures and medical systems from around the world grapple with the concept of the mind-body connection, then goes through a clear and accessible overview of the nervous, endocrine, and immune systems, and then explores mind-body techniques used in modern societies. Investigates the mind-body connection in the context of: western medicine, traditional medical systems of different cultures, health effects of "good" versus "bad" stress, meditation and other stress reduction techniques, positive and negative emotions, medical applications of hypnosis, the placebo and nocebo effects, and disorders such as anxiety and depression.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PUBLPOL 184: Poverty and Policies in Developing Economies

Economic models of growth and poverty, differences in growth rates among countries, and the persistence of poverty. Models of physical and human capital accumulation, and recent theories of the importance of institutions, social capital, and political factors. The effectiveness of social policies in developing countries, emphasizing India, in the light of theories of growth and poverty, and in terms of immediate goals and long-term consequences. Policies include schooling and health, anti-poverty, banking, and political decentralization. Limited Enrollment. Prerequisites: ECON 1 and ECON 50.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

REES 23: Issues in Global Health: Russia and Eastern Europe

Activity course features Stanford faculty and researchers who lecture weekly on their experiences working international health issues. Focus this year will be on the global region including Russia, and East Europe.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

SIW 113: Critical Health Issues in the U.S. and Abroad

Terms: Win | Units: 5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

SOMGEN 204: Mobile Health Without Borders

Overview of innovations in mobile health, global health, and entrepreneurship. Each class features lectures from multiple world leaders on themes, challenges, opportunities in m-health. Content delivered in hybrid in-person seminar and webinar format connecting participants from around the world in class discussions and assignments.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 1 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

SOMGEN 206: Global Medical Issues Affecting Women (FEMGEN 206)

This course probes the principal issues affecting women and girls medically around the world. Through interactive discussions, guest lectures, case studies, and academic readings, students become acquainted with the most critical challenges to women¿s health globally, and use selected analytical tools to assess how these may be addressed efficiently, cost-effectively, and sustainably. Topics include women¿s cancer, birth control, infertility, female genital mutilation, midwifery, obstetric fistula, breastfeeding, violence against women, and women's representation in biomedical research. The aim is to cultivate in students a nuanced appreciation of women¿s unique needs, roles, and challenges in the contemporary global health landscape.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 1 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

STRAMGT 545: Taking Social Innovation to Scale

How do you get the best new social innovations to reach the hundreds of millions of people who need it the most? And how do ensure that they are developed, deployed and scaled in a way that is relevant, appropriate and sustainable?nnnInnovators tackling the world’s most difficult problems often ignore, misunderstand, and under-invest in the critical business challenges involved in crossing “the middle of the value chain.” This is innovation’s valley of death: product and system adaption and evaluation; evidence generation and design validation; business and partnership planning; formal or informal regulatory approval and registration. How do you design, introduce, and optimize the intervention’s uptake before it can be taken to scale by markets, governments or other systems? nnnThe class is taught be Steve Davis, President & CEO of PATH (www.path.org), a leader in global health innovation, and former global Director of Social Innovation at McKinsey & Company.nnnWe take an inter-disciplinary approach to look at the factors that pull innovation forward, push it from behind, and (often to the world’s detriment) block its successful implementation and scaling. First grounding the discussion in research on innovation and social change, we then apply business principles, real world experiences and several important case studies in global health to examine the way good ideas get stuck, and how good ideas can turn into innovation that matters. We focus on root causes for failure, success factors, and business practices and tools to enable millions of lives to be impacted by social innovation. The seminar combines lectures, case studies, visiting practitioners and team projects focused on the business case for scaling specific social innovations. The goal is to help the next generation of social innovation leaders think more about some of the mistakes of the past, lessons for the future, and new ways of approaching old problems, all from a practitioner’s point of view.
Units: 2 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded

SURG 150: Principles and Practice of International Humanitarian Surgery (SURG 250)

Open to undergraduate students. Focus is on understanding the theory behind medical humanitarianism, the growing role of surgery in international health, and the clinical skills necessary for students to partake in global medical service. Guest speakers include world-renowned physicians and public health workers. Students work in groups to complete a substantial final project on surgical program development.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

SURG 231: Healthcare in Haiti and other Resource Poor Countries

Originally developed to highlight healthcare in exreme poverty in Haiti, related lectures have been added covering healthcare in resource poor environments with the objective to introduce students to the complexity and unique problems of working in the Third World's healthcare morass.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

SURG 250: Principles and Practice of International Humanitarian Surgery (SURG 150)

Open to undergraduate students. Focus is on understanding the theory behind medical humanitarianism, the growing role of surgery in international health, and the clinical skills necessary for students to partake in global medical service. Guest speakers include world-renowned physicians and public health workers. Students work in groups to complete a substantial final project on surgical program development.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
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