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DESINST 311: Design Abilities Studio

In this Design Abilities Studio students will learn and practice several applied skills with hands-on activities that vary in length, duration, deliverables, and concept. This course focuses on developing core design abilities that make individuals better design thinkers and creative problem solvers. This class is for students of any discipline. Admission by application. See dschool.stanford.edu/classes for more information.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Grading: Credit/No Credit

DESINST 366: Creative Gym: A Design Thinking Skills Studio

Build your creative confidence and sharpen your design thinking skills. Train your intuition and expand the design context from which you operate every day. This experimental studio will introduce d.school students to fast- paced experiential exercises that lay the mental and physical foundation for a potent bias toward action, and a wider knowledge of the personal skills that expert design thinkers utilize in all phases of their process. Recent research based on this course curriculum show that performing these class activities will expand your creative capacity in statistically significant ways.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

ENGR 280: From Play to Innovation

Focus is on enhancing the innovation process with playfulness. The class will be project-based and team-centered. We will investigate the human "state of play" to reach an understanding of its principal attributes and how important it is to creative thinking. We will explore play behavior, its development, and its biological basis. We will then apply those principles through design thinking to promote innovation in the corporate world. Students will work with real-world partners on design projects with widespread application. This course requires an application. You can find the application here: dschool.stanford.edu/classes
Terms: Spr | Units: 2-4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ENGR 311A: Women's Perspectives

Master's and Ph.D. seminar series driven by student interests. Possible topics: time management, career choices, health and family, diversity, professional development, and personal values. Guest speakers from academia and industry, student presentations with an emphasis on group discussion. Graduate students share experiences and examine scientific research in these areas. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Sheppard, S. (PI)

ENGR 311B: Designing the Professional

Once I get my degree, how do I get a life? What do you want out of life after Stanford? Wondering how to weave together what fits, is doable, and will be truly meaningful? Join us for Designing the Professional. This course applies the innovation principles of design thinking to the "wicked problem" of designing your life and vocation in and beyond Stanford. We'll approach these lifelong questions with a structured framework set in a seminar where you can work out your ideas in conversation with your peers. Seminar open to all graduate students (PhD, Masters) and Postdocs in all 7 schools.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

ENGR 311D: Portfolio to Professional: Supporting the Development of Digital Presence Through ePortfolios

This course guides graduate students in creating a professional ePortfolio and establishing an online presence. The course includes seminar-style presentations and discussions, opportunities for feedback with career mentors, classmates, alumni, employers, and other community members using think-aloud protocols and peer review approaches. Curriculum modules focus on strategies for telling your story in the digital environment, platform considerations, evidence and architecture, visual design and user experience. Open to all graduate students and majors.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Chen, H. (PI); Patel, S. (PI)

ETHICSOC 278M: Introduction to Environmental Ethics (ETHICSOC 178M, PHIL 178M, PHIL 278M, POLISCI 134L)

How should human beings relate to the natural world? Do we have moral obligations toward non-human animals and other parts of nature? And what do we owe to other human beings, including future generations, with respect to the environment? The first part of this course will examine such questions in light of some of our current ethical theories: considering what those theories suggest regarding the extent and nature of our environmental obligations; and also whether reflection on such obligations can prove informative about the adequacy of our ethical theories. In the second part of the course, we will use the tools that we have acquired to tackle various ethical questions that confront us in our dealings with the natural world, looking at subjects such as: animal rights; conservation; economic approaches to the environment; access to and control over natural resources; environmental justice and pollution; climate change; technology and the environment; and environmental activism.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

LAWGEN 115N: Human Rights Advocacy

What are the origins of the human rights movement and where is it headed? What does it mean to be a human rights activist? What are the main challenges and dilemmas facing those engaged in human rights advocacy? In the space of seven decades, human rights advocates have transformed a marginal utopian ideal into a central element of global discussion, if not practice. In this seminar we will examine the actors and organizations behind this remarkable development as well as the vast challenges faced by advocates in the recent past and today. Together, we will learn to be critical of, as well as to think, and act, like human rights advocates. This seminar will introduce you to some the main debates and dilemmas within the human rights movement. We will consider and understand the differing agendas of western international nongovernmental organizations (INGOs) and their counterparts in the frequently non-western) developing world, as well as tensions between and among rights advocates along other important dimensions (civil and political vs. economic, social and cultural rights; rights promotion through engagement of powerful actors vs. challenging structures of power, etc.). The seminar seeks to develop your ability: 1) to understand human rights and social justice issues as contested political, legal and cultural phenomena; 2) to review advocacy texts, videos and other interventions critically; 3) to appreciate the political dimensions of efforts to promote human rights; 4) to understand how recent history constrains and structures options and possibilities for social intervention to promote rights and justice. During the course of the quarter you will be required to submit several short reflection papers and develop a human rights advocacy campaign.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Cavallaro, J. (PI)

ME 315: The Designer in Society

This class focuses on individuals and their psychological well being. The class delves into how students perceive themselves and their work, and how they might use design thinking to lead a more creative and committed life. As a participant you read parts of a different book each week and then engage in exercises designed to unlock learnings. In addition, there are two self-selected term project dealing with either eliminating a problem from your life or doing something you have never done before. Apply the first day during class. Attendance at first session is mandatory; otherwise, at most one absence is acceptable.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Klebahn, P. (PI)

MS&E 254: The Ethical Analyst

The ethical responsibility for consequences of professional analysts who use technical knowledge in support of any individual, organization, or government. The means to form ethical judgments; questioning the desirability of physical coercion and deception as a means to reach any end. Human action and relations in society in the light of previous thought, and research on the desired form of social interactions. Attitudes toward ethical dilemmas through an explicit personal code.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Nesbitt, D. (PI)

MS&E 277: Creativity and Innovation

This ambitious course focuses on factors for unlocking innovation and entrepreneurship in prison. In partnership with The Last Mile at San Quentin State Prison, students will learn the knowledge, skills, and attitudes needed to frame and reframe problems, challenge assumptions, generate innovative ideas, and tell compelling stories to communicate their ideas. Students will work collaboratively with the men at San Quentin on a project related to incarceration. Tuesday sessions are experiential workshops and Thursdays are a required lab for team work. Enrollment is limited, and requires an application and interview.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Seelig, T. (PI)

PEDS 206: Exploring Happiness and Health (PEDS 106)

Evidence-based research findings, theoretical concepts and applied experiences related to emotional well-being, and physical and mental health. Topics include basic cognitive neuroscience and psychological research in pro-social emotions, such as gratitude, compassion, forgiveness and mindfulness practice. Course offers lecture, readings, and applied practices that enhance mental health, resiliency and well-being. Emphasis on issues relevant to high-achieving young adults.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

POLECON 342: Finding Spiritual Meaning at Work: Business Exemplars

This course explores the experience of respected business leaders who have been able to integrate their spiritual and business lives successfully. It also provides an explicit opportunity for students to discuss their own intentions to find deep meaning in and through their business careers. Difficulties, struggles and barriers will be examined as well. Readings will include both biographies of specific business people and background materials on the major religious and philosophical traditions represented. A number of the exemplars whose biographical information will be examined, like Jeff Weiner of LinkedIn, will be invited to class -- initially to listen to the class discussion, and then to provide feedback to students, expand on their own biographies and the background resources read in preparation for each class, and respond to questions and answers. This course will help students elucidate how their business careers fit into what ultimately matters most to them and how to build moral courage and long-term commitment to their ideals.
Units: 3 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded

WELLNESS 114: Emotional Social Intelligence: Increasing Life Effectiveness

Examine, understand, and develop emotional and social intelligence (ESI). Presents leading models of and skills for enhancing emotional and social intelligence in order to measurably increase life effectiveness. Blends course lecture, discussion, peer coaching, and guided practice to develop theoretical and practical knowledge of ESI. Assess, understand, and utilize ESI strengths and mitigate weaknesses in order to enhance stress management and resilience, increase self-other awareness, and increase balanced productivity and impact.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

WELLNESS 117: Behavior Change: Building A Better You

Change behaviors using evidence-based techniques. Addresses the roles of habit cycles, procrastination mitigation, productivity enhancement, motivational factors, self-compassion, and addiction and addictive processes (both substances and non-substance related) in changing behaviors from maladaptive to adaptive patterns. Drawing from current findings in the neuroscience and psychology of behavior change and habit formation, utilize motivational interviewing, cognitive reframing, peer coaching, and mindfulness meditation models and intervention strategies.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Chima, A. (PI)

WELLNESS 130: Meditation

Introduces diverse forms of meditation practice in both theory (contemplative neuroscience, phenomenological traditions) and practice. Practices in guided imagery, compassion, loving kindness, positive emotion, mindfulness and mantra meditation will be offered to enhance stress management and well-being. While meditation practices emerge from religious traditions, all practice and instruction will be secular.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
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